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Article

Bromley H. Kniveton

The aim of this paper is to investigate whether those involved with recruitment/selection (RS) react differently towards male and female trainee managers.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate whether those involved with recruitment/selection (RS) react differently towards male and female trainee managers.

Design/methodology/approach

Measures of the perceptions towards trainee managers were collected from 440 managers and professionals involved in recruitment/selection (RS).

Findings

It was found that males were seen to have more stereotype male management characteristics than females. Female (RS) perceived female management trainees as possessing more male management characteristics than did male (RS).

Practical implications

The stereotype of the management trainee held by male (RS), with its emphasis on “male characteristics” would suggest females do face an unequal struggle in their careers. It is argued that male management characteristics, whilst possibly appropriate for organisations with a hierarchical structure, may not be as appropriate for the participatory organisational structure, which is becoming more common. Suggestions are made to help develop management skills for both male and female trainees.

Originality/value

This article gives the perceptions of people who recruit male and female trainee managers and will be of interest to employers and employees alike.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article

Richard D. Johnson, Hal Gueutal and Cecilia M. Falbe

The purpose of this paper is to integrate previous research findings on the factors which affect e‐learning effectiveness. To do this, a model is developed which proposes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to integrate previous research findings on the factors which affect e‐learning effectiveness. To do this, a model is developed which proposes that the effects of individual learner characteristics and technology characteristics on e‐learning outcomes are partially mediated by the metacognitive learning processes in which the learner engages.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 914 individuals in an online introductory information systems course examines the relations between general computer self‐efficacy (GCSE), locus of control, age, peer interaction, technology reliability, social presence, media synchronicity, and metacognitive activity and the e‐learning outcomes of course, performance, course utility, and course satisfaction.

Findings

The results indicate that GCSE, age, social presence, reliability, media synchronicity, and metacognitive activity are related to course satisfaction and utility judgments. In addition, age, metacognitive activity, and reliability are related to course performance and interaction is related to satisfaction. Finally, metacognitive activity partially mediates the relationship between social presence, media synchronicity and satisfaction, and utility judgments.

Originality/value

This paper represents one of the first to investigate a model of e‐learning effectiveness which integrates research on metacognitive activity as well as the role of technology and trainee characteristics.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article

Malabika Sahoo and Sumita Mishra

Trainees’ motivation to transfer the training imparted is an important constituent in determining required training outcomes in organizations. The purpose of this study is…

Abstract

Purpose

Trainees’ motivation to transfer the training imparted is an important constituent in determining required training outcomes in organizations. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of trainee characteristics, training attitudes and training need analysis on motivation to transfer training.

Design/methodology/approach

Research hypotheses were tested using a survey. A questionnaire was used to collect data from employees of an Indian governmental power transmission organization, attending any one soft skills training programme in the past year. Out of the 500 questionnaires distributed, 389 were deemed useable for the study, producing an effective response rate of 77.8 per cent.

Findings

The findings establish a direct and positive association between trainee characteristics, training attitudes and need analysis with transfer motivation.

Originality/value

This study contributes to extant literature by examining associations in hitherto underexplored areas such as that of training attitudes and training need analysis with transfer motivation. In addition, the findings provide insights into challenges pertaining to transfer motivation in soft skills training initiatives.

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Article

Irene Nikandrou, Vassiliki Brinia and Elissavet Bereri

The purpose of the paper is to present an empirical study based on a trainee‐oriented systemic model for training transfer. The paper examines trainee characteristics

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to present an empirical study based on a trainee‐oriented systemic model for training transfer. The paper examines trainee characteristics which affect the motivation to learn and transfer and determine the trainees' entry behavior. Then, during the training process, the complex interactions among the trainer, the trainees and the content and method used are taken into account to assess what are here termed direct and indirect training transfer. Finally, organizational factors affecting both the training transfer and the trainee him/herself are examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used 44 in‐depth interviews with trainees from different organizations who participated in a training program that was based on an innovative experiential training method (project method).

Findings

The results reveal the importance of trainee characteristics in the training transfer process and provide useful insights regarding the design and management of the training program.

Originality/value

The qualitative methodology used is a strong element of this study as it provides rich information regarding the training transfer process. The research design framework, i.e. interviewing trainees one year after the training took place, revealed important factors affecting the training transfer process.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article

Derk‐Jan J.M. Nijman, Wim J. Nijhof, A.A.M. (Ida) Wognum and Bernard P. Veldkamp

The purpose of this article is to provide further insight into the relationship between supervisor support and transfer of training, by taking into account the effects of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide further insight into the relationship between supervisor support and transfer of training, by taking into account the effects of other transfer‐influencing factors in a systemic approach of the transfer process.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of studies on factors affecting transfer of training was conducted, with a specific focus on the effects of supervisor support, resulting in the development of a research model of the transfer process. All components of the model were measured by means of questionnaires for former trainees and their supervisors, and stepwise regression analyses were carried out to examine the relationships in the model.

Findings

Results indicate indirect relationships between supervisor support and transfer of training, by means of both trainees' motivation to transfer and the transfer climate. The indirect effect of supervisor support on transfer of training is only slight, however. Learning results are shown to be the strongest predictor of transfer of training.

Research limitations/implications

Owing to the small sample size structural equation modelling techniques could not be used, thus limiting the possibility to test the model as a single entity. The use of perceptional measures implies the risk of response tendencies from trainees and supervisors. Further research using different measures and different timing of measurement during the training and transfer process is recommended.

Practical implications

Results of this study indicate that supervisor support that is intended to enhance transfer of training can best be directed at improvement of the transfer climate at the workplace.

Originality/value

The paper provides both researchers and practitioners with a further insight into the complex effects of supervisor support on transfer of training, indicating the importance of taking into account the effects of other transfer‐influencing factors.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article

Ragini and Piyali Ghosh

Purpose of this study is to investigate the role of learner readiness in enhancing transfer of training by empirically testing a moderated mediation mechanism in which…

Abstract

Purpose

Purpose of this study is to investigate the role of learner readiness in enhancing transfer of training by empirically testing a moderated mediation mechanism in which learner readiness influences transfer through motivation to transfer, and this indirect impact is moderated by supervisor support.

Design/methodology/approach

The perception of trainees about the constructs considered has been captured through a survey of 250 employees of a unit of a manufacturing organization in India. For hypotheses testing, PROCESS macro developed by Hayes (2013) has been used.

Findings

Results have confirmed the significant role played by learner readiness in predicting transfer. This apart, supervisor support has been proved to moderate the indirect impact of learner readiness on transfer.

Practical implications

Trainees need to have pre-requisite knowledge to learn the content of a training programme, which would enable them to grasp such content and transfer the same subsequently to work. It is also essential that trainees are willing to attend any training voluntarily. Specific interventions may be designed for supervisors to bolster their catalytic role in training transfer.

Originality/value

An interactionist approach has been adopted by focussing on learner readiness as a less-studied trainee characteristic and supervisor support as a situational factor of transfer. This is construed as a significant contribution of this study to training literature. The potential overlap between learner readiness and motivation to transfer as trainee characteristics is seen to be neutralized by the presence of supervisor support as a moderator. Findings help in understanding how a trainee’s readiness and motivation, together with supervisor’s positive attitude, can enhance transfer.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article

Fredrick Muyia Nafukho, Mary Alfred, Misha Chakraborty, Michelle Johnson and Catherine A. Cherrstrom

The primary purpose of this study was to predict transfer of learning to workplace among adult learners enrolled in a continuing professional education (CPE) training…

Abstract

Purpose

The primary purpose of this study was to predict transfer of learning to workplace among adult learners enrolled in a continuing professional education (CPE) training program, specifically training courses offered through face-to-face, blended and online instruction formats. The study examined the predictive capacity of trainee characteristics, training design and work environment on transfer of learning among the study respondents.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional online survey design was used to collect data from the study respondents, three months after CPE training. Two hundred ninety-seven trainees participated in this study. Data from 46 participants were incomplete and therefore excluded in the preliminary analysis, resulting in 251 valid responses and participants for the data analysis, 43 males (17.1 per cent), 201 females (80.1 per cent) and 7 (2.8 per cent) who did not indicate their gender. To answer the study’s research questions, factor analysis and multiple hierarchical regressions were performed.

Findings

The results of the study revealed training efficiency and relevance were critical in the transfer of learning among the study participants. The findings of the study showed combined training efficiency and training relevance enabled training participants to acquire knowledge and skills for application in the workplace and had significantly positive influence in transfer of learning. The work environment, measured by work variability (or flexibility) and work complexity, and the trainee motivation to participate, measured by learning-conducive workplace features, had a positive influence in transfer of learning.

Research limitations/implications

Because the majority of participants were females (80.1 per cent), this could be one of the limitations to this study. Research has identified that, because of the broad expectations based on sex and different family and occupational roles, men and women differ in their social network communication, participation in CPE, personality traits, gender-related occupational preferences, learning preference and methods of handling workplace conflict. The second limitation is related to the study design. The researchers did not have a control group because of practicality issues. This being a cross-sectional online survey study, all extraneous variables were not controlled such as in the case of a true randomized control study. This study is relying on the information obtained from a self-report training transfer instrument completed by the study participants. The accuracy of the obtained data is dependent on the honesty of the participants and their commitment in providing correct responses.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical evidence pertaining to the transfer of learning among adult learners engaged in a continuing professional development training program. The study examines factors related to training design, training delivery, trainee motivation and the workplace environment and how these factors determine transfer of learning among trainee respondents who participated in the study. The findings of the study have practical implications for the design and successful delivery of continuing professional training among adult learners. The study could be replicated at a national level and in international settings.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article

Brian Showler, Barrie O. Pettman and Malcolm J. Maguire

This article seeks to examine the role and effectiveness of retraining in British Government Skillcentres (formerly Government Training Centres) using case study material

Abstract

This article seeks to examine the role and effectiveness of retraining in British Government Skillcentres (formerly Government Training Centres) using case study material from a project based on the North Humberside local labour market. In the first section the background to the project and the methodology utilised are outlined. Secondly, we examine the characteristics of the Skillcentre trainees and their evaluations of the courses followed. Thirdly, we discuss the job search process and post‐training employment experience of these trainees. The fourth section concentrates on the demand side consideration of the responses and views of employers vis‐à‐vis Skillcentre trainees. Finally, we conclude that while such retraining programmes have met with some limited success there are certain important aspects which warrant further discussion.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article

Clifton P. Campbell

Instructional materials enhance the teaching/learning process by exhibiting information necessary to acquire knowledge and skills. Focuses on printed forms of…

Abstract

Instructional materials enhance the teaching/learning process by exhibiting information necessary to acquire knowledge and skills. Focuses on printed forms of instructional materials and provides detailed information, including examples, on five types of job performance aids, three types of instruction sheets, and two types of modules. Checklists of considerations that affect the quality of finished products are also provided. Job performance aids (JPAs)provide procedural or factual guidance in the performance of tasks. They store essential details in a variety of functional forms for use just before or during task performance. Research shows that JPAs are a cost‐effective supplement or alternative to training. They reduce the time needed to master task performance and facilitate the transfer of learning from the training setting to the job. Instruction sheets assure that all trainees have the same complete and accurate information for performing practical work and for completing assignments. These sheets also help manage large groups of trainees with diverse abilities who are working simultaneously at several different tasks. Modules are carefully structured documents which facilitate self‐directed and self‐paced learning. While their components may vary, modules typically include learning objectives, an introduction, instructional content, directions, learning activities, and test questions with feedback answers. With modules, trainees assume personal responsibility for their progress. Regardless of the care used in their preparation, all types of instructional materials must be evaluated prior to general use. Presents a comprehensive quality control procedure for confirming effectiveness and value. This was prepared to enhance both formal classroom instruction and individual study. Figures, tables, checklists, appendices, and a glossary of keywords and terms, supplement the text in explaining the content.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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