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Article

Ibrahim Cifci, Ozan Atsız and Vikas Gupta

This study aims to understand the components of the street food experiences of the local-guided tour in the meal-sharing economy based on the online reviews of tourists…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand the components of the street food experiences of the local-guided tour in the meal-sharing economy based on the online reviews of tourists who experienced a meal-sharing activity with a local guide in Bangkok.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the qualitative approach, this study involved a content analysis of 384 narratives on Withlocals.

Findings

The study identified seven components that embrace the street food experience: a local guide's attributes, perceived food authenticity, local culture, perceived safety and novelty. Results also revealed that the Thai street foods are unique and authentic and can reach this experience level through a local guide.

Originality/value

Although the importance of international travellers' street food experiences and the popularity of the meal-sharing economy platforms are rapidly growing, there is no study which had combined both of these phenomena together to date. It is the first attempt to reveal the components of street food experiences in a meal-sharing platform.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Jos Bartels and Isabelle van den Berg

This study aims to focus on how to capitalise on the natural and logical alliance of nutrients in the marketing of fresh fruit and vegetables.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on how to capitalise on the natural and logical alliance of nutrients in the marketing of fresh fruit and vegetables.

Design/methodology/approach

A Dutch survey study was carried out among a representative sample of the Dutch population (n=492). Respondents filled out a questionnaire on: perceptions of fresh fruit and vegetables; interest in, knowledge of, and trust in, antioxidants and fresh fruit and vegetables; domain‐specific innovativeness and social identification; means of communication; and information‐seeking and buying behaviour.

Findings

Based on consumption patterns, respondents were divided into non‐, light and heavy organic food users. Results show that there are significant differences between the three consumer groups on domain specific innovativeness, social identification and attitudes towards antioxidants in fresh fruit and vegetables.

Practical implications

Non‐users of organic food are difficult to reach with communication regarding nutrients and organic produce, in contrast to light and heavy users. Light users could be triggered by more peripheral message cues, while heavy users are more sensitive to the content of the message. Differentiated strategies for light and heavy users of organic food should be developed in order to effectively communicate the added value of nutrients in fresh fruit and vegetables.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine the role of domain specific innovativeness and social identification in attitudes towards antioxidants in fresh fruit and vegetables. The empirical findings from this study are expected to benefit the continued development on health communication messages.

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Article

Elisabetta Savelli, Laura Bravi, Federica Murmura and Tonino Pencarelli

The purpose of this paper is to understand whether an experiential perspective can be usefully adopted in the context of traditional-local foods (TLFs) by assuming a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand whether an experiential perspective can be usefully adopted in the context of traditional-local foods (TLFs) by assuming a consumer perspective that analyses attitudes and behaviours of young people towards truffles. In particular, it examines which values drive the consumption of truffles and whether they are perceived as an experiential-based food or simply a nutritional-based one.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was carried out through a survey conducted on a sample of 720 Italian university students from January to May 2016. The data were processed using analysis of variance, principal component analysis and a two-step cluster analysis.

Findings

The results show that the search for pleasure and gratification can be very important for young consumers and that gratification plays a critical role in the consumption of fresh truffles along with convenience. This confirms that TLFs, like truffles, can be highly appreciated by young consumers for their emotional content, which allows them to have a personal experience when buying and consuming them.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the literature by enriching the overall understanding of young people’s food behaviour and by deepening the adoption of the experiential perspective within the TLF business. Moreover, it has practical and useful implications for promoting the consumption of TLFs among the young and for managing TLFs as well as the rural areas from where they originate.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Katerina Giazitzi, George Palisidis, George Boskou and Vassiliki Costarelli

This study aims to assemble and nutritionally analyze three traditional Greek hotel breakfast meals (Chalkidiki, Cyclades and Crete) and compare them with the American…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assemble and nutritionally analyze three traditional Greek hotel breakfast meals (Chalkidiki, Cyclades and Crete) and compare them with the American, English and continental breakfast.

Design/methodology/approach

The traditional local breakfast foods and beverages for the breakfast compositions were selectively chosen predominantly from the website of the “Greek breakfast” initiative by Greek Chamber of Hotels and from other sources, following a thorough review of the literature. The breakfast meals were designed to be consumed by two people. The nutritional analysis of the meals was performed with the use of specially designed spreadsheets, the US Department of Agriculture Research Service and Greek food composition database.

Findings

The nutritional analysis of the English (45.9 g), American (41.6 g) and Cretan (38.8 g) breakfast meals revealed that these breakfast meals had the highest amount of total fat (per estimated portion) with the Cretan breakfast containing the largest amount of monounsaturated fatty acids (2.9 g/100 kcal). Moreover, the Cretan breakfast had also the lowest levels of sugars (2 g/100 kcal). The highest quantity of simple sugars was contained in the continental breakfast (7.2 g/100 kcal). The English breakfast had the highest sodium content (186.3 mg/100 kcal). Finally, the Cyclades breakfast had very high levels of potassium (184.4 mg/100 kcal) and Chalkidiki’s breakfast had the highest amount of calcium (65.2 mg/100 kcal). The three traditional Greek breakfasts and the three conventional breakfasts were grouped in two categories and compared nutritionally. The results show that the content of monounsaturated fats is significantly higher in Greek breakfast meals (p-value < 0.05) compared to the conventional ones.

Originality/value

This nutritional comparison could facilitate the promotion of traditional Greek breakfast meals in tourist destinations.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Book part

Ana Jovičić Vuković and Aleksandra Terzić

Being the basic need of humans, but also an attractive element of the tourist offer, gastronomy is related to the attractiveness of a destination, and Balkan gastronomy is…

Abstract

Being the basic need of humans, but also an attractive element of the tourist offer, gastronomy is related to the attractiveness of a destination, and Balkan gastronomy is considered to be one of the most positive aspects of the tourist image of the region. This study aims to investigate the locals' perception of gastronomic specificity of ‘Balkan food’ and national (local) food as well. Furthermore, the study investigated how ‘Balkan food’ is perceived in terms of its tourist potential, uniqueness, quality, nutrition and its general role in the creation of a joint ‘Balkan’ tourist brand. The methodology included a historical approach and a survey which involved110 respondents. Out of 21 traditional dishes identified in the official tourist promotional activities of selected countries and a review of the relevant literature, the following are identified as regional ‘Balkan’ dishes: ‘pečenje’, ‘musaka’, ‘ćevapi’ and ‘sarma’. The following are identified as national dishes: ‘pastrmajlija’, ‘sogan dolma’, ‘raštan’, ‘pašticada’, ‘burek’ and ‘svadbarski kupus’. The results indicated that some nations have specific knowledge of certain dishes being considered national and regionally present, while other nations show a lack of knowledge of food origin and regional presence in identified countries. Furthermore, the results showed that different dimensions of Balkan cuisine significantly contribute to the tourist potential of the region, while the contribution of its nutritive characteristics is perceived as less important. Results showed that ‘Balkan food’ is considered to be important for the improvement of the ‘Balkans'’ image and promotion, as well as important for the creation of the regional tourism brand.

Details

Gastronomy for Tourism Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-755-4

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Article

Peter Jones, Peter Shears, David Hillier, Daphne Comfort and Jonathan Lowell

The increasingly vociferous criticism of the fast food industry is being paralleled by a growing interest in Slow Food. This case study outlines the origins of the Slow…

Abstract

The increasingly vociferous criticism of the fast food industry is being paralleled by a growing interest in Slow Food. This case study outlines the origins of the Slow Food movement in Italy in the mid 1980s and describes its spread and growth since then. A simple examination of the movement’s characteristics and activities reveals that, while many of its members seek to celebrate the simple pleasures of eating and drinking local produce and share a series of homespun philosophies, the movement itself has ambitious and potentially far reaching goals. The case study then goes on to explore some of the issues raised by the movement and concludes that while Slow Food provides a valuable contrast to the seemingly all powerful fast food industry it seems unlikely to be able to challenge the power of that industry or to promote widespread changes in the modern world’s eating habits.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 105 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Sandeep Munjal, Sanjay Sharma and Pallavi Menon

The paper aims to research the current understanding of Slow Food in the Indian hospitality sector and to identify how the industry can embrace the concept and its…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to research the current understanding of Slow Food in the Indian hospitality sector and to identify how the industry can embrace the concept and its sustainability. To begin, underpinnings are considered in relation to traditional, locally produced food for patrons that is actually “farm to fork” in terms of its delivery model as evidenced by backward integration in the supply of key ingredients. The economics of the backward integration is analysed to measure its impact on businesses’ bottom-line in the context of an inflationary economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Existing published literature is reviewed with reference to the “Slow Food movement” from both an international and Indian perspective. Vedatya’s approach to sustainable culinary value chain creation and its applicability for industry adoption with an intent to offer Slow Food on commercial menus is documented and discussed. A round table discussion with key food and beverage leaders is also documented and analysed to establish the current state of awareness and readiness of the sector to offer “Slow Food” through an integrated supply chain in India.

Findings

Slow Food as a concept is new to India; there is a huge shift in many parts of the world towards food that is fresh, traditional and drawn from locally available ingredients. This research shares Vedatya’s experience in developing an integrated value chain that can provide a sustainable Slow Food model for the Indian hospitality and restaurant sector to deploy with a positive impact on profitability too.

Research limitations/implications

There is need for more research to better understand the feasibility of hospitality businesses working on supply chain with backward integration, to offer “Slow Food” to consumers. While there seems to be a demand for traditional food, this paper does not research that aspect; further research is required to ascertain the potential demand for Slow Food in India.

Practical implications

The popularity of Slow Food is global; however, the Indian hospitality sector is yet to warm up to this potential. The customer focus on healthy, traditional, fresh food opens an opportunity to innovate, and businesses that build capacity to offer real farm-to-fork menus can become market leaders and will reap bottom-line benefits through lower input costs because of supply chain integration.

Originality/value

This paper is unique in terms of offering a discussion on the potential of Slow Food as the next realm of culinary innovation in India. It also adds value by sharing the Vedatya experience in terms of developing an integrated supply chain that facilitates the Slow Food offering in a farm-to-fork format. The model can be emulated by commercial hospitality businesses resulting in cost advantages and higher satisfaction levels of customers.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article

Vikas Gupta and Manohar Sajnani

The purpose of this paper is to find out how the overall destination experiences of the foreign tourists in India are influenced by the perceived authenticity of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find out how the overall destination experiences of the foreign tourists in India are influenced by the perceived authenticity of the street foods and the degree of their variation/modification. It will also discuss how these characteristics further influence the tourists’ behavioural intentions (intention to revisit and word-of-mouth).

Design/methodology/approach

Data have been collected from 263 foreign tourists visiting Delhi at various street food vending sites using location intercept technique through structured questionnaire. Different ad hoc scales were adapted based on previous studies for measuring the perception of authenticity, ability to adapt, cultural disparity and overall perceived experience. The partial least squares method was applied to achieve the dual estimation of the measurement and the structural model.

Findings

Result indicates that perceived authenticity and cultural disparity have a positive influence on the overall perceived experiences of the foreign tourists. It is also found that the degree of variation/modification in the street foods condenses the authenticity perception of the tourists. Findings reveal that the tourists are less influenced by the cultural disparity when they are able to adapt to diverse cultures and simultaneously authenticity have a larger effect on their overall destination experiences.

Originality/value

Although various studies have been conducted in the past related to the food experiences of tourists at various destinations, this will be the first attempt to find out how the overall destination experiences of the foreign tourists in India are influenced by the perceived authenticity of the street foods and the degree of their variation/adaptation. It will help the stakeholders to appropriately align the gastronomic product and enhance the tourists’ overall destination experiences.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Book part

Nikola Vuksanović and Dunja Demirović Bajrami

The aim of the research was to analyse the image of Vojvodina's cuisine and tourist satisfaction with food experience as part of a rural tourism offer in Vojvodina…

Abstract

The aim of the research was to analyse the image of Vojvodina's cuisine and tourist satisfaction with food experience as part of a rural tourism offer in Vojvodina province (Serbia). This chapter is based on research carried out among 891 foreign tourists who visited villages in Vojvodina. The obtained results were examined via exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, multiple regression analysis (stepwise method) and T-test. The obtained results indicated that factors like food uniqueness and cultural heritage, food quality and price, nutrition and health benefits of food and affective image of food influence the image of local cuisine. The results showed that local cuisine (food) can serve as a tool for building destination's brand identity. The study pointed out the role and significance of the image of local cuisine on rural tourist attractions but also on tourist satisfaction with food experience. Also, the contribution of the research is reflected in three aspects: theoretical implication, methodological and practical contribution.

Details

Gastronomy for Tourism Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-755-4

Keywords

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Article

Mohamed E.A. Mohamed, Mahamoud M. Hewedi, Xinran Lehto and Magdy Maayouf

Using destination brand experience as a conceptual lens and data evidence from international visitors to Egypt, the purpose of this study is to examine the relative impact…

Abstract

Purpose

Using destination brand experience as a conceptual lens and data evidence from international visitors to Egypt, the purpose of this study is to examine the relative impact of the various dimensions of local food experience on tourist overall food satisfaction and destination revisit intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from a convenience sample of international visitors to Cairo, Egypt, (N = 302) was quantitatively analyzed using the structural equation modeling approach to test the relationships among constructs.

Findings

Empirical results reveal that three components of destination food experiences – sensory, affective and behavioral – effectively explain tourists’ food satisfaction and destination revisit intention, while intellectual food experience was reported to only influence destination revisit intention. Interestingly, the effect of food experience satisfaction on destination revisit intention was not significant.

Research limitations/implications

This study identifies local food experience aspects that require to be managed at a strategic level and provides guidelines on how these aspects can be effectively managed.

Originality/value

This study is the first empirical application of a multidimensional experience model to the context of tourists’ local food experience; it identifies the multifaceted characteristics of local food experience that deserve scholars’ and marketers’ attention.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

1 – 10 of 175