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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Monica Samuel Chipungahelo

The purpose of this paper is to examine knowledge sharing on traditional vegetables for supporting food security among farmers and other communities in Kilosa district…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine knowledge sharing on traditional vegetables for supporting food security among farmers and other communities in Kilosa district, Tanzania.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study design was employed. Semi-structured questionnaires with both open- and closed-ended questions were used to collect quantitative data in three wards of Kilosa District in Tanzania. Interviews were used to collect qualitative data from three heads of farmer groups, and direct observation was used to validate findings obtained from questionnaires.

Findings

The results showed that farmers used a socialisation approach to share indigenous knowledge about traditional vegetables on production, consumption and preservation.

Research limitations/implications

The study necessitates a need to conduct regular studies on sharing knowledge of traditional vegetables among different communities for supporting food security.

Practical implications

The paper provides a framework for agricultural development planners on how to improve the management of indigenous knowledge on traditional vegetables with scientific knowledge in local communities for improving food security in Tanzania.

Social implications

The paper has an implication for improving knowledge-sharing strategies on traditional vegetables in supporting food security in Tanzania, and other parts of Africa and developed countries. There is a need for knowledge intermediaries to develop knowledge database on production, consumption and preservation of traditional vegetable to increase the dissemination of this knowledge and, hence, improve nutrition and food security.

Originality/value

The paper provides appropriate knowledge-sharing strategies which are needed to improve sharing of indigenous knowledge about traditional vegetables in Tanzania and other developed and developing countries.

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Book part
Publication date: 18 June 2020

Anindya Bhukta

Abstract

Details

Legal Protection for Traditional Knowledge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-066-2

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

Andrew M. Cox, Jorge Tiago Martins and Gibrán Rivera González

The study aims to understand the nature of traditional knowledge by examining how it is used and reinvented in the context of Xochimilco in Mexico City.

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to understand the nature of traditional knowledge by examining how it is used and reinvented in the context of Xochimilco in Mexico City.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on field site visits and focus group interviews.

Findings

Traditional knowledge was being reinvented in two contrasting ways. One was based on heritage tourism drawing on syncretism between Aztec and Spanish culture in the formation of Xochimilco. The other was agro-ecological focussed on traditional farming practices on the chinampas, their productivity, their ability to sustain biodiversity and their link to social justice. There were some common elements, such as a passionate concern with retaining a valued past in the face of growing threat.

Research limitations/implications

Traditional knowledge is often seen as a static heritage, under threat. But it also has the potential to be a fertile source of strong identities and sustainable practices.

Originality/value

The paper helps to conceptualise the dynamic character of traditional knowledge.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 76 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2020

Deepjyoti Kalita and Dipen Deka

Systematic organization of domain knowledge has many advantages in archiving, sharing and retrieval of information. Ontologies provide a cushion for such practices in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Systematic organization of domain knowledge has many advantages in archiving, sharing and retrieval of information. Ontologies provide a cushion for such practices in the semantic Web environment. This study aims to develop an ontology that can preserve the knowledge base of traditional dance practices.

Design/methodology/approach

It is hypothesized that an ontology-based approach for the chosen domain might boost collaborative research prospects in the domain. A systematic methodology was developed for modeling the ontology based on the analytico-synthetic rule of library classification. Protégé 5.2 was used as an editor for the ontology using the Web ontology language combined with description logic axioms. Ontology was later implemented in a local GraphDB repository to run queries over it.

Findings

The developed ontology on traditional dances (OTD) was tested using the dances of the Rabha tribes of North East India. Rabha tribes are from an indigenous mongoloid community and have a robust presence in Southeast Asian countries, such as Myanmar, Thailand, Bangladesh, Bhutan and Nepal. The result from HermiT reasoner found the presence of no logical inconsistency in the ontology, while the OOPS! pitfall checker tool reported no major internal inconsistency. The induced knowledge base of traditional dances of the Rabha’s in the developed OTD was further validated based on some competency questions.

Research limitations/implications

In the growing trend of globalization, preservation of the cultural knowledge base of human societies is an important issue. Traditional dances reflect a strong base of the cultural heritage of human societies as they are closely related to the lifestyle, habitat, religious practices and festivals of a specific community.

Originality/value

The current study is exclusively designed, keeping in mind the variables of traditional dance domain based on a survey of the user- and domain-specific needs. The ontology finds probable uses in traditional knowledge information systems, lifestyle-based e-commerce sites and e-learning platforms.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2022

Chandra Lal Pandey and Anoj Basnet

Managing disasters using modern science and traditional knowledge systems in silos has several prospects and limitations. Despite the catalyst role of the traditional

Abstract

Purpose

Managing disasters using modern science and traditional knowledge systems in silos has several prospects and limitations. Despite the catalyst role of the traditional knowledge in reducing the risks of disasters and adapting to climate change, this knowledge has not featured prominently in any of the existing disaster policies and disaster science. The authors demonstrate how traditional knowledge and modern science can be integrated for holistic approach of disaster risk reduction and management.

Design/methodology/approach

Using qualitative research method complemented by thorough literature review, this article captures traditional knowledge and practices of communities in the Narayani Basin for flood disaster risks reduction and management and shows ways to integrate traditional knowledge and modern science for holistic approach of disaster risk reduction and management.

Findings

The authors found that traditional knowledge system and practices have worked as an alternative to modern technoengineering approaches of disaster risk reduction and management and hold immense potential to contribute against disasters; therefore, this knowledge system of the communities not only needs to be recognized, conserved and documented but also is to be incorporated into efforts to formulate effective disaster management strategies and be amalgamated with the technoengineering practices for a holistic approach so that it can ensure disaster safety and security of the communities.

Research limitations/implications

The authors conducted this study collecting primary data from Narayani basin only; however, the authors believe that these practices and findings of the research may still be representative.

Practical implications

The practical implication of this research is that traditional knowledge system needs to be integrated with technobureaucratic knowledge of disaster management, enabling to develop a more robust and holistic approach of disaster risk reduction and management.

Social implications

This research documents being extinct traditional knowledge system and empowers communities by supporting them to integrate and use both traditional knowledge and modern technobureaucratic knowledge for building communities flood resilient.

Originality/value

This research is based on both primary and secondary data and original in case of its findings and conclusion, and no similar research contextualizing the role of traditional knowledge system in flood disaster management has been conducted in Narayani Basin of Nepal in the past.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Damian Laryea, Esther Yeboah Akoto, Ibok Oduro and William Ofori Appaw

The purpose of this study is to identify the various traditional foods available in two towns in Ghana and to assess consumer perception about these traditional foods…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify the various traditional foods available in two towns in Ghana and to assess consumer perception about these traditional foods. Traditional foods provide nutritional and health benefits, but their consumption keeps declining, such that some are becoming extinct.

Design/methodology/approach

The level of knowledge of consumers and their attitude toward the consumption of traditional foods were determined. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Sekondi and four areas in Kumasi, with a sample size of 200 in each of the two towns. The data obtained were analyzed using Pearson correlation and Chi-square test for independence.

Findings

While consumers had very good general knowledge of the traditional foods, most of them had little knowledge on nutrient compositions of the foods. About 95.5 per cent of respondents in Sekondi consumed traditional foods relative to those in Kumasi (62.5 per cent). There was no linear relationship existing between respondents’ knowledge, attitude and consumption of traditional foods (r < 0.50). More so, respondents’ attitude, knowledge and consumption of traditional foods, mostly, did not depend on the demographic factors (age and education). Other factors such as convenience, economic status of respondents and safety of traditional foods may be contributory factors to the low patronage and consumption of traditional foods.

Originality/value

Most researches on traditional foods in Ghana have mostly focused on food ingredients; therefore, there is little or no available information on consumer perception of prepared traditional foods. Because consumer opinions change over time, there is a need to consistently gather data to help food industries and food service operators meet consumer needs and expectations.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Gisele M. Arruda and Sebastian Krutkowski

This paper aims to place a discussion of traditional knowledge and the indigenous voice within the framework of Arctic governance.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to place a discussion of traditional knowledge and the indigenous voice within the framework of Arctic governance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involves literature review spanning different disciplines and highlighting important case studies.

Findings

The advance of low-cost, portable technology has brought about tremendous opportunities for indigenous people. Knowledge and observation are no longer monopolised by scholars, filmmakers or politicians based in the West. Film has proved to be a powerful tool for cultural preservation while the internet (video sharing sites and social media platforms in particular) have empowered local communities and facilitated their involvement in political activism and local governance. New ways to represent themselves have been a crucial step forward, yet the new goal is to work towards greater recognition of the “indigenous voice” and ensure traditional knowledge is not treated as anecdotal and irrelevant in managing Arctic affairs..

Research limitations/implications

The conclusions reached in the discussion need to be further explored by extending the research into Inuit communities to survey how technology can facilitate and impact collaborative forms of governance in the Arctic.

Practical implications

This research provides an increased understanding of how technology transforms power relations. Policymakers can see that the indigenous community in the Arctic is not lodged in the past. Their increased use of new technology can serve as an effective oversight of political decisions and economic initiatives, particularly those relating to oil and gas exploration in the region.

Social implications

Indigenous views and knowledge are literally crossing borders through media. Initially perceived as a cultural threat, film, video and internet are now regarded as powerful technology tools for cultural preservation and empowerment of local communities. In other words, the modern communication patterns are a crucial mean of indigenous population take part of the current global debate, express their concerns, reinforce their values and traditions and have an active voice in the globalised world.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates how technology helps indigenous communities to address different economic, environmental, cultural, educational, research and other issues in the Arctic. Robust evidence is presented to support the call for traditional knowledge to become an integral part of decision-making processes across all institutions of governance in the Arctic.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Rumana Asad, Iftekhar Ahmed, Josephine Vaughan and Jason von Meding

Urban flooding in developing countries of the Global South is growing due to extreme rainfall and sea-level rise induced by climate change, as well as the proliferation of…

Abstract

Purpose

Urban flooding in developing countries of the Global South is growing due to extreme rainfall and sea-level rise induced by climate change, as well as the proliferation of impervious, built-up areas resulting from unplanned urbanisation and development. Continuous loss of traditional knowledge related to local water management practices, and the de-valuing of such knowledge that goes hand-in-hand with globalised aspirations, is inhibiting flood resilience efforts. This paper aims to address the need to include traditional water knowledge (TWK) in urban living and development processes in the Global South.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper commences with a review of existing frameworks that focus on natural resource management, critically assessing two existing frameworks of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK). The assessment of the existing approaches contributes to this paper’s development of a novel framework to promote TWK with regard to resilience and risk reduction, specifically for developing flood adaptive strategies, which is the second stage of this paper. Finally, the paper explains how the framework can contribute to the field of urban design and planning using examples from the literature to demonstrate challenges and opportunities related to the adaptation of such a framework.

Findings

The framework developed in this paper reveals three proposed vertices of TWK, named as place-based landscape knowledge, water use and management and water values. This framework has the potential to produce context-specific knowledge that can contribute to flood-resilient built-environment through urban design and practices.

Research limitations/implications

The framework developed in this paper reveals three proposed vertices of TWK, named place-based landscape knowledge, water use and management and water values. This framework has the potential to produce context-specific knowledge that can contribute to flood-resilient built-environment through urban design and practices.

Originality/value

Within the field of TEK research, very few researchers have explored the field of developing flood resilience in an urban context. The proposed TWK framework presented in this paper will help to fill that gap.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Bright Chisadza, Mike J. Tumbare, Innocent Nhapi and Washington R. Nyabeze

The purpose of this paper is to identify, analyse and document local traditional indicators used in drought forecasting in the Mzingwane Catchment and to assess the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify, analyse and document local traditional indicators used in drought forecasting in the Mzingwane Catchment and to assess the possibility of integrating traditional rainfall forecasting, using the local traditional indicators, with meteorological forecasting methods.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-administered structured questionnaires were conducted on 101 respondents in four districts of the Mzingwane Catchment area, namely, Beitbridge, Mangwe, Esighodini and Mwenezi from February to August 2012. In addition, key informant interviews and focus group discussions were also used in data collection and the collected data were analysed for drought history and demographics; drought adaptation and the use of drought forecasting methods in the catchment using Statistical Package for Social Science.

Findings

The paper reveals the growing importance of precipitation forecasts among Mzingwane communities, particularly the amount, timing, duration and distribution of rainfall. Rainfall was cited as the major cause of drought by 98 per cent of the respondents in the catchment. Whilst meteorological rainfall forecasts are available through various channels, they are not readily accessible to rural communities. Furthermore, they are not very reliable at local level. The paper shows that communities in the Mzingwane Catchment still regard local traditional knowledge forecasting as their primary source of weather forecasts. The paper finds that plant phenology is widely used by the local communities in the four districts for drought forecasting. Early and significant flowering of Mopane trees (Colophospermum mopane) from September to December has been identified to be one of the signals of poor rainfall season in respect to quantity and distribution and subsequent drought. Late and less significant flowering of Umtopi trees (Boscia albitrunca) from September to December also signals a poor rainfall season.

Originality/value

The paper fulfils an identified need to study and document useful traditional drought indicators. Furthermore, the paper provides a platform for possible integration of traditional drought forecasting and meteorological forecasting and ensure sustainable rural livelihood development. The paper is useful to both meteorological researchers and resource-constrained communities in Mzingwane Catchment.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2006

J. Michael Finger

How can we help poor people to earn more from their knowledge – rather than from their sweat and their muscle? This chapter is about promoting the innovation, knowledge

Abstract

How can we help poor people to earn more from their knowledge – rather than from their sweat and their muscle? This chapter is about promoting the innovation, knowledge, and creative skills of poor people in poor countries – and particularly about improving the earnings of poor people from such knowledge and skills. My principal message is that a lot is being done in this regard. On the whole, this useful work is a matter of straightforward application of familiar legal and commercial instruments and skills such as copyrights, trademarks, and patents. This does not mean that it is easy, however.

Details

Developmental Entrepreneurship: Adversity, Risk, and Isolation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-452-2

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