Search results

1 – 10 of 25
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2012

Amal M.H. Abdel-Haleem, Henar A. Seleem and Wafaa K. Galal

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential quality of Kamut® (triticum turgidum turanicum) as an ancient relative of modern durum wheat for food preparation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential quality of Kamut® (triticum turgidum turanicum) as an ancient relative of modern durum wheat for food preparation and Egyptian consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology included in this paper is based on quality evaluation of Kamut wheat of the Dashure-Fayume geographical origin physically, chemically and technologically compared to Beni Suef 1, Beni Suef 3 and Suhag 3, the most dominant durum varieties in Egypt. After that, producing a specific end product (traditional couscous) regarded the critical quality aspects in Kamut wheat.

Findings

The results obtained showed that Kamut grains had higher physical properties indicating higher milling yield potential. Besides, Kamut flour was remarkable with higher protein and oil content. The use of a farinograph for assessing the rheological properties of Kamut dough has proven a useful quality for its measured characteristics compared to the Egyptian durum varieties. The good physical and rheological properties, coupled with high protein content, validated that Kamut is a valuable addition to the Egyptian diet and suited for the production of pasta and/or couscous. The sensory attributes of traditional couscous were significantly (p < 0.05) highly acceptable to the panelists.

Originality/value

These results lead to valuable addition and improvement of the Egyptian diet which consider The Sustainable Agricultural Development Strategy (SADS) towards 2030 in Egypt based on achieving higher rates of food security in strategic goods in regard to improve food quality and safety, especially Kamut wheat which produces high quality grains without artificial fertilizers and pesticides.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Boutheina Ben Gamra Zinelabidine, Lilia Touzani, Norchène Ben Dahmane and Mourad Touzani

Adopting a customer-dominant logic perspective, the purpose of this paper is to understand how some tourists decide on unusual trips and how they associate meanings to…

Abstract

Purpose

Adopting a customer-dominant logic perspective, the purpose of this paper is to understand how some tourists decide on unusual trips and how they associate meanings to transform their experience into an event.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is exploratory and involves three qualitative data collection techniques. The authors conducted individual interviews complemented by travel narratives with tourists that decided to undertake off-track travel. The third method is ethnographic and focuses on tourists participating in a singular ritualistic festival.

Findings

Several factors explained how off-track travelers associate meanings to turn their real-life experience into a successful event. These factors cover three main concepts: discovery, social link and identity.

Practical implications

The authors propose managerial implications for ordinary service providers in the tourism sector. Managers should attempt to provide tourists with a framework within which they can create their own events and take initiatives. They must be supportive of tourists re-enhancing their experience and making efforts to create their own event.

Originality/value

This research explains how services must be less standardized to satisfy tourists looking for immersion, exoticism and authenticity and to support their initiatives.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Julienne Brabet, Maria-Giuseppina Bruna, Jean-François Chanlat and Florimond Labulle

French Republican Model and ‘laïcité, the French version of secularism’, are supposed to protect the citizens, at work or elsewhere, against any form of discrimination and…

Abstract

French Republican Model and ‘laïcité, the French version of secularism’, are supposed to protect the citizens, at work or elsewhere, against any form of discrimination and France has a long history of immigration. Ethnical and racial discriminations at work are nevertheless observable towards visible minorities today. People from North African ascendance as well as those from French overseas territories 1 ’ origins are heavily penalized in the job market. Neither direct and indirect laws nor the ‘voluntary initiatives’ introduced by companies seem able to solve this problem at a time when massive unemployment and terrorist Islamic attacks on the French soil are creating a situation of crisis.

Details

Race Discrimination and Management of Ethnic Diversity and Migration at Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-594-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2016

Belaïd Abrika, Bernard Paranque and Cécile Perret

In a period of moral and economic crisis all the alternative solutions to finance economic activities are interesting to study, specifically those embedded in solidarity…

Abstract

Purpose

In a period of moral and economic crisis all the alternative solutions to finance economic activities are interesting to study, specifically those embedded in solidarity practices. The nature of the ties (bonding ties, linking ties or bridging ties) and solidarities (institutional solidarity, formal or informal solidarity, intergenerational solidarity) must then be examined.

Methodology/approach

The exchanges between the people are governed by three different modes: the market, the redistribution and the reciprocity which acts to maintain the relation (Lavoué, Jézequel, & Janvier, 2010, p. 34). The exchanges are not only of economic order and also participate in the symbolic world. Our main question is: can the relations of exchange become emancipated from the reification? We illustrate this chapter with the case of the Kabylian traditional society and market (Benet, 1957–1975) where the practices of exchanges are not only of economic order (redistribution …) but also matter with the symbolic world (honour).

Findings

Even today, in Kabylia, the survival of an ancestral social organisation (tajmaat) which has anchored in tradition and rooted values (tirugza) and practices (tiwiza) sometimes allows the local populations to offer the missing public goods or the solidarity towards those who need help (elders, orphans).

Originality/value

In traditional Kabyle society, exchange practices are not only economic in nature (they contribute to mutual assistance, redistribution, etc.), but are also symbolic.

Details

Finance Reconsidered: New Perspectives for a Responsible and Sustainable Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-980-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Saoussen Lakhdar and Fatma Smaoui

This paper aims to explore the socio-cultural meanings of functional foods for Tunisian consumers and to understand how these meanings shape their preferences and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the socio-cultural meanings of functional foods for Tunisian consumers and to understand how these meanings shape their preferences and practices in the particular context of a Middle-East and North African (MENA) region.

Design/methodology/approach

A constructivist perspective based on multi-qualitative methods was designed allowing data collection in a natural setting through focus groups interviews, individual in-depth interviews and projective techniques among Tunisian consumers.

Findings

Findings show the complexity and importance of conscious and unconscious non-health-related socio-cultural factors in the construction and acceptance of functional foods by the Tunisian consumer. Common sense knowledge, social environment and tradition shape the constructions and practices of functional foods. These factors may act as a shortcut to compensate for unhealthy behaviour and as a social marker to reflect trendiness and identity.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are specific to the Tunisian setting and may be not transferable to other settings.

Practical implications

The role of information is central in functional food acceptance. Communication on health effects should consider not only the formal nutritional health benefit but also lay knowledge.

Social implications

The findings of this research contribute in the government’s understanding of Tunisian’s constructions of health and well-being by suggesting that besides health motives, non-health-related factors such as lay knowledge, social influences and conspicuous consumption play an important role in functional foods choice.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to extend functional foods literature by exploring the complex interconnected conscious and unconscious socio-cultural constructions behind functional food choice. It contributes also to the understanding of the food consumer behaviour in the specific cultural context of the Arab-Muslim MENA region, an under investigated setting.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Fiona H. McKay, Megan Bugden, Matthew Dunn and Chantelle Bazerghi

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of asylum seekers who were entitled to use a foodbank but who had ceased attending the service, to understand why…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of asylum seekers who were entitled to use a foodbank but who had ceased attending the service, to understand why they were not using the charity, and to investigate their food-related experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a mixed-method approach utilising telephone interviews. Interviews were conducted with 70 asylum seekers in Melbourne, Australia, between September 2015 and February 2016. Interviews explored food-related settlement experiences, food insecurity and experiences of hunger.

Findings

Two-thirds of participants were identified as experiencing food insecurity. Despite food and financial insecurity, participants were not using the foodbank as frequently as they were entitled as: the food was not culturally or religiously appropriate to them; asylum seekers with income felt uncomfortable taking food from others who were perceived to be in greater need; or because they were experiencing transport barriers. Participants also experienced a range of physical and mental health concerns.

Originality/value

Ensuring asylum seekers have access to culturally appropriate foods and services is essential. However, given the diversity in foodbank membership, it may not be feasible to provide all of the desired foods at no cost; instead, increased access to culturally appropriate foods may be achieved through a subsidy programme. Novel or alternative approaches to community engagement and food distribution may be needed to increase food security and to decrease hunger in this group.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2011

Robin Patric Clair, Isaac Clarke Holyoak, Theon E. Hill, Prashant Rajan, Elizabeth L. Angeli, Melissa L. Carrion, Sydney Dillard, Rati Kumar and Shaunak Sastry

This study uses ethnographic methods to explore the discursive practices that give life to ethnic restaurants, establishing identity, and addressing community engagement…

Abstract

This study uses ethnographic methods to explore the discursive practices that give life to ethnic restaurants, establishing identity, and addressing community engagement. Employing postcolonial and postmodern perspectives that discuss discursive practices of hybridity, authenticity, and commoditization, the research focused on five culture-specific restaurants: Irish, Italian, Korean, Mediterranean, and Middle Eastern. The restaurants' stories are studied through observation, interviews, and the situated approach as discussed by Denzin (1994). The findings suggest that some restaurants openly embraced hybridity, defied and debunked stereotypes, and resisted hegemonic constructions of individuals and of culture by enacting narratives of defiance, while others attempted to maintain traditional images or commodify the culture. Using the situated approach revealed a post-postcolonial tension between certain restaurants within the community.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-156-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2010

Tite Ngoumou

This chapter addresses urban food provisioning through a case study of banana plantain production, distribution, and consumption centering around two Cameroonian villages…

Abstract

This chapter addresses urban food provisioning through a case study of banana plantain production, distribution, and consumption centering around two Cameroonian villages – Koumou and Oban. Recent and rapid urban population growth in Cameroon has brought attention to the issue of urban food supply, which has always been assured by a traditional organization of numerous small operators and which has proven to be more effective overall than initiatives adopted by public authorities. This chapter identifies the actors involved in urban food provisioning systems in Cameroon and highlights the often underlooked role played by cultural and social factors within the economy of food.

Details

Economic Action in Theory and Practice: Anthropological Investigations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-118-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Andy Gatley

The purpose of this paper is to explore the routine, everyday experiences and attitudes people bring to cooking and eating and aims to compare the significance of such…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the routine, everyday experiences and attitudes people bring to cooking and eating and aims to compare the significance of such culinary cultures to diets in France and Britain.

Design/methodology/approach

The initial phase of this qualitative, comparative research involved in-depth interviews with 13 French and 14 British citizens who were each asked to reflect upon foods eaten in the home, preparation methods and issues surrounding dietary practices and culinary cultures. The next phase of the research asked “experts” working within the field to reflect and elaborate upon the initial findings and in total ten French and nine British “experts” were interviewed.

Findings

The results reveal how to a greater extent French respondents relied upon raw ingredients from which they more regularly prepared “traditional”, structured and commensal meal occasions. Such a food model remains a significant part of everyday life and culinary cultures in France support the consumption of a relatively healthy diet unlike in Britain.

Research limitations/implications

This is a small exploratory study based on a limited number of respondents. Further research would benefit from observing what people actually do rather than relying on what people say they do.

Practical implications

Those responsible for promoting healthier diets need to further prioritise the significance of culinary cultures to cooking practices and diet.

Originality/value

While the influence of domestic cooking practices on food intake has received some scholarly attention, this paper presents a more holistic insight into how culinary cultures can play a significant mediating role on diets more generally.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2015

Lisa F. Clark and Jill E. Hobbs

Discusses how changes in institutional objectives for international food assistance have influenced the organization of supply chains for innovative therapeutic foods…

Abstract

Purpose

Discusses how changes in institutional objectives for international food assistance have influenced the organization of supply chains for innovative therapeutic foods designed to address problems of malnutrition and undernutrition.

Methodology/approach

Draws upon insights from donor and international organization reports, policy documents, and academic publications to reveal the structure, goals, and objectives of international organizations involved in food assistance strategies. Explores how innovations in Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Foods and Ready-to-Use Supplementary Foods fit into food assistance strategies and broader humanitarian goals.

Findings

Informed by the United Nations Millennium Development Goals, international food assistance strategies have broadened beyond acute malnutrition to include chronic undernutrition. Food assistance strategies have shifted toward a focus on local and regional procurement (LRP) over transoceanic aid, with Public Private Partnerships (P3s) playing a facilitating role.

Originality/value

This chapter raises important considerations to factor into the design and execution of international food assistance strategies using LRP/P3 modes of organization. It contributes to an understanding of the challenges of organizing international food assistance strategies that include socioeconomic goals of sustainability and nutrition objectives.

1 – 10 of 25