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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Bradley S. O′Hara and Paul A. Herbig

Although arguments – both pro and con – can beconstructed regarding trade shows, evidence suggests that enhancementsto these events may be necessary. Reports an…

Abstract

Although arguments – both pro and con – can be constructed regarding trade shows, evidence suggests that enhancements to these events may be necessary. Reports an exploratory study, in which exhibitors at an industrial regional trade show were queried concerning potential improvements to trade shows and the perceived impact of these changes on the elements of the personal selling process. Results demonstrate that attendee quality, attendee quantity and measuring trade show results should be increased. Although the net effect of these changes, in concert with nine others examined, would be to impact positively all aspects of the personal selling process, the exhibitor′s ability to establish goodwill with customers would significantly improve relative to all other personal selling dimensions. Additionally, significant improvements to communicating, intelligence gathering and prospecting would be achieved relative to selling and servicing.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2010

Harriette Bettis‐Outland, Jane S. Cromartie, Wesley J. Johnston and Aberdeen Leila Borders

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the need for developing a return on trade show information (RTSI) index; this index would be used to measure the impact of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the need for developing a return on trade show information (RTSI) index; this index would be used to measure the impact of information gathered at trade shows on long‐term decision making within the organization. Also, the paper aims to suggest differences in how exhibitors and visitors perceive tangible versus intangible benefits that accrue as a result of utilizing new information acquired at trade shows.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilizes a conceptual approach, employing the market orientation framework to develop a model for the return on trade show information (RTSI). It incorporates the acquisition, dissemination and utilization of new trade show information, suggesting that perceived information quality acts as a moderator in this relationship.

Findings

The return on trade show information (RTSI) index describes both tangible and intangible benefits that accrue to the organization as a result of information acquired at trade shows. However, in some cases the same information that is acquired at trade shows is also available from alternative sources, potentially making it difficult to determine true RTSI.

Originality/value

The manuscript offers an innovative perspective for estimating the value of new information acquired at trade shows, suggesting differences in the way in which exhibitors and visitors perceive, as well as utilize, trade show information. This opens the door to future research in the area of trade show information value; in addition, this can benefit practitioners by providing a different method for evaluating the investment value of trade show participation.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Harriette Bettis-Outland, Roberto Mora Cortez and Wesley J. Johnston

This paper aims to evaluate the behavior of micro and macro business networks in a trade show context. The following questions are addressed: How do business networks…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the behavior of micro and macro business networks in a trade show context. The following questions are addressed: How do business networks impact organizational learning at trade shows? Can relational ties between networks influence organizational learning? Does trust play a role between different network types and organizational learning?

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical framework for this research is based on the broad spectrum of social exchange theory (Cropanzano and Mitchell, 2005; Foa and Foa, 1974, 1980; Kelley and Thibault, 1978; Kelley, 1997). Social exchange theory has several different interpretations; one common view of this theory involves a series of interactions that result in obligations for the participating members (Emerson, 1976; Cropanzano and Mitchell, 2005). This model extends the Levin and Cross (2004) model presented in their article, “strength of weak ties you can trust: the mediating role of trust in effective knowledge transfer”.

Findings

This paper is a review and synthesis of trade show, trust, organizational learning and business network literature. This conceptual paper concludes with eight propositions, which delve into connections between micro and macro networks, strong and weak ties in these networks and the effect on organizational learning. Trust is the mediating variable between networks and organizational learning. High levels of trust could change the learning approach (adaptive, generative or transformative) of the different networks.

Research limitations/implications

The propositions integrate extant research on trade shows and will guide future research regarding the relationship between types of business networks, trust and organizational learning.

Practical implications

This conceptual paper looks at trade shows from a network perspective; specifically, how do trade show networks impact organizational learning. Trade show participation results in different approaches to organizational learning, which can be modified based on the level of trust that exists between network members. Trade show participation enables both adaptive and generative learning. However, atypical interactions between business networks occasionally produce transformative learning.

Originality/value

This conceptual paper offers an innovative approach to trade show research by analyzing the relationship between trade shows and organizational learning from a network perspective, using trust as the mediating variable.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Paul Herbig, Brad O’Hara and Fred Palumbo

Trade shows can be crucial components of a firm’s marketing mix. This modern day version of the central market is often poorly understood and overlooked by many corporate…

Abstract

Trade shows can be crucial components of a firm’s marketing mix. This modern day version of the central market is often poorly understood and overlooked by many corporate design makers seeking effective and efficient ways to promote the firm’s products and service. Compares non‐exhibitors and exhibiting firms, examines major differences between the two groups, and provides a profile of non‐exhibiting firms. Finally, offers some tips around when to, and when not to, exhibit and aspects to increase exhibit effectiveness.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2012

Anja Geigenmüller and Harriette Bettis‐Outland

This paper's aim is to provide a conceptual framework explaining drivers of service brand equity. It refers to the trade show industry as an example for an international…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper's aim is to provide a conceptual framework explaining drivers of service brand equity. It refers to the trade show industry as an example for an international, highly competitive environment, where service providers face the challenge to differentiate themselves from competing brands. Based on a comprehensive literature review, the paper develops a conceptual model of service brand equity. The paper concludes with directions for further research and managerial implications.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a conceptual work, which derives research propositions from an extended literature review.

Findings

It is proposed that a service provider's competence relates positively to a service customer's purchasing value which, in turn, leads to customer service satisfaction and service brand equity. The paper further posits that the provider's service concept, service processes, and service system are constituents of service competence, thus representing crucial determinants of service brand equity.

Research limitations/implications

The research has limitations that are due to the exploratory nature of the work. The paper suggests opportunities for further research, particularly an empirical test of the model in various B2B service industries.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that the value attendees derive from using trade show services is strongly related to the support they receive in establishing and nurturing customer relationships or in engaging in market and competitor analysis. Considering service brand equity, trade show organizations should therefore develop innovative concepts for trade shows that accommodate their clients' needs, including an appropriate physical environment, customer‐oriented service processes, and high‐quality interactions between service employees and customers.

Originality/value

The paper sheds light on a phenomenon that, despite its increasing acceptance among practitioners, remains unexplored by marketing research. By providing a better understanding of B2B service brand equity in a trade show context, the paper enriches research on trade fair issues.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Gillian Rice

International trade shows have increased in importance for thepromotion of goods and services overseas. Relatively little is knownabout participation by firms in these…

Abstract

International trade shows have increased in importance for the promotion of goods and services overseas. Relatively little is known about participation by firms in these shows. The International Marketing and Purchasing Group′s interaction model is an appropriate analytical tool for investigating trade shows in international marketing strategy. Explains why the interaction model is useful in this context and provides directions for research about international trade shows. Also suggests managerial implications for developing international trade show strategy.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Timothy M. Smith, Kazuyo Hama and Paul M. Smith

Examines the attendance objectives of Japanese visitors for both a domestic (Japanese) and offshore (US) trade show, and explores the relationship between a successful…

Abstract

Examines the attendance objectives of Japanese visitors for both a domestic (Japanese) and offshore (US) trade show, and explores the relationship between a successful trade show visit and future attendance intentions. Results suggest that attendees maintain very similar goals for international show attendance regardless of the show’s geographical location, but conceptualize successful trade show participation differently. Also demonstrates that successfully achieving different types of attendee objectives significantly increases attendees’ interest levels in future attendance at each of the two shows examined. Success in seeing products and trends at the domestic show was found to affect future show interest significantly. Whereas at the offshore US show, successful supplier interaction only affects interest when combined with seeing products and trends and gathering buying process information. These findings have strong implications for researchers investigating the relatively under‐studied issues of international buyer behavior at trade shows and practitioners involved in the organization of and exhibition at international events.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 18 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2010

Srinath Gopalakrishna, Catherine A. Roster and Shrihari Sridhar

Although trade shows are a significant part of the B2B communications mix, academic research in the area is sparse. To successfully manage this medium, a careful…

Abstract

Purpose

Although trade shows are a significant part of the B2B communications mix, academic research in the area is sparse. To successfully manage this medium, a careful understanding of attendee behavior on the trade show floor is necessary. Drawing from the rich literature on shopper typologies in retailing (which parallels the trade show atmosphere), this paper sets out to develop a set of attendee metrics that show organizers can track regularly.

Design/methodology/approach

Through latent class clustering on unique attendee‐level data from a popular computer trade show, five segments of attendee activity are uncovered that differ along dimensions such as the attendee's involvement and focus and the exhibitor's booth size, booth accessibility, and product display.

Findings

Significant heterogeneity is found in attendee activities on the show floor. There are interesting similarities and differences between the retail and B2B shopper. Implications for trade show organizers and exhibitors are discussed and directions for future research suggested.

Originality/value

Since the data employed are becoming more readily available, the hope is that managers and academic researchers might find the suggested metrics and segmentation approach useful in advancing a deeper understanding of the trade show attendee.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Harriette Bettis‐Outland, Wesley J. Johnston and R. Dale Wilson

This paper seeks to provide an exploratory empirical study of the variables that are part of the return on trade show information (RTSI) concept, which is based on the use…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide an exploratory empirical study of the variables that are part of the return on trade show information (RTSI) concept, which is based on the use and value of information gathered at a trade show.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is designed to explore relationships and identify those variables that are a particularly important part of the RTSI concept. The paper provides an exploratory test of the relationship between a series of variables that are related to the value of information gathered at trade shows. Data were collected from trade show attendees approximately 60 days after the trade show. A multiple regression model was developed that explores the relationship between the dependent variable that focuses on information value and the independent variables on various aspects of information acquisition, information dissemination, and information use.

Findings

The final multiple regression model found a significant relationship for several variables and has an adjusted R2 value of 0.552. Four significant independent variables were identified – one each in the information use and the shared information categories and two in the information acquisition category. These findings present an interesting picture of how information is used within an organization after it is acquired at a trade show.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited by the multiple regression model used to explore the relationships in the data. Also, data from only one trade show were used in the model.

Practical implications

This paper focuses on the intangible, longer‐term benefits as important considerations when determining the value of new trade show information to the firm. The evaluation of trade show information also should include these intangible benefits, such as improved interdepartmental relations or interactions as well as discussions with other trade show participants in finding new uses for information that impacts the company's future success, as well as shorter‐term benefits such as booth activity.

Originality/value

The paper offers a unique approach for determining the value of information acquired at trade shows. Though information gathering has been included as an outcome variable in previous trade show studies, no other research has studied the value of this new trade show information to the company.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2010

Kåre Skallerud

This paper seeks to examine the differences at international trade shows between exhibitors who participate in joint booths and those who participate in individual booths…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the differences at international trade shows between exhibitors who participate in joint booths and those who participate in individual booths. The structure, strategy and trade show performance of exhibitors at joint booths and those at individual booths are analysed.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents an empirical study of 208 exhibitors at an international food and beverage show, focusing on the differences in structure, strategy and performance between individual exhibitors and exhibitors at joint booths. The differences are identified and discussed.

Findings

Individual exhibitors place more personnel and products at their booths and they allocate more resources, top management commitment and planning. However, exhibitors at joint booths have more formalised planning and objective setting. The performances of five groups of trade show activities were assessed. Individual exhibitors perform significantly better on image‐building activities at the show. There are no differences with regard to firm characteristics between the two participation modes.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by the fact that the sampling frame is made up of exhibitors at a single international food and beverage show, and may therefore be more representative of that kind of show. Despite the limitations encountered, the findings have important implications for exhibitors at international trade shows and export marketing programmes as well as other marketing programmes offering services to international trade show exhibitors.

Originality/value

A broad range of joint booths and strategy variables is investigated. Also, a more comprehensive and theoretical grounded performance measure is adopted compared with previous research.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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