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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2021

Elizabeth Oddone Paolucci, Michele Jacobsen, Lorelli Nowell, Georgina Freeman, Liza Lorenzetti, Tracey Clancy, Alessandra Paolucci, Helen Pethrick and Diane L. Lorenzetti

Student mental well-being is a matter of increasing concern on university campuses around the world. Social, psychological, academic and career aspects of graduate…

Abstract

Purpose

Student mental well-being is a matter of increasing concern on university campuses around the world. Social, psychological, academic and career aspects of graduate learning are enriched through peer mentorship. Peer-mentoring experiences and the impacts of these relationships on the mental well-being of graduate students remain underexplored in the scholarship of teaching and learning. The purpose of this study was to explore how engagement in formal and informal peer mentorship, as described by students across four academic disciplines, impacts the social connectedness and well-being of graduate students.

Design/methodology/approach

A convergent mixed methods research design was used, with quantitative and qualitative data gathered in parallel to gain a comprehensive, corroborated and integrated understanding of graduate students’ perspectives and experiences with peer mentorship. Online survey and interview data were collected from graduate thesis-based master’s EdD and PhD students in education, medicine, nursing and social work. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis.

Findings

The authors found a commonality of graduate student experiences across disciplines with respect to the diverse psychosocial impacts of graduate peer mentorship. Peer-mentoring relationships offered mentees emotional support, motivation and a sense of community and offered mentors opportunities for self-development and gratification.

Originality/value

This research is unique in its in-depth exploration of the interdisciplinary perspectives and experiences of graduate students from Education, Nursing, Medicine and Social Work. While further research is needed to explore the implementation of structural approaches to support the development of peer-mentoring relationships in graduate education, the multidisciplinary focus and depth and breadth of this inquiry suggest the potential transferability of the study findings to other disciplines and academic settings. The findings from this study further highlight the need for strategic activation of existing program resources to foster greater connectedness and well-being among graduate students.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 December 2021

Phillip M. Jolly, Susan E. Gordon and Timothy T. Self

The restaurant industry is characterized by long hours, intense job demands and a lack of work-life balance. While a growing body of research has investigated methods for…

Abstract

Purpose

The restaurant industry is characterized by long hours, intense job demands and a lack of work-life balance. While a growing body of research has investigated methods for decreasing role conflict-related stress and strain in foodservice and hospitality employees, there is still little understanding of what supervisors can do to decrease work-life-related employee strain. This study aims to investigate how family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB) influence employee emotional exhaustion (EE) and subsequent turnover intentions, as well as the role of gender in moderating these effects.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey-based design using a national panel of 226 foodservice employees was used to investigate the hypotheses developed in this paper.

Findings

Results indicated that FSSB decreased employee EE and subsequent turnover intentions. The authors also found that this relationship was stronger for female employees.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides insight into the role that employee gender may play in response to the perception of and reactions to FSSB. Women still shoulder a majority of home and non-work caring duties, and therefore, they may be more positively affected when supervisors engage in behaviors that allow for balancing work and non-work demands.

Originality/value

There is little hospitality or foodservice-focused research into the effects of FSSB, and little overall research that investigates the role that gender may play in shaping the beneficial effects of FSSB. Given that women make up a majority of foodservice employees in the USA, yet there is a lack of female representation at higher levels of organizations, the study provides insights into ways in which organizations and supervisors can improve female employees’ working experiences and potentially increase their retention.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 July 2006

Stephanie Al Otaiba, Jeanine Clancy-Menchetti and Christopher Schatschneider

More than ever before, researchers and policymakers expect general education classroom to be the first line of defense in efforts to prevent reading difficulties…

Abstract

More than ever before, researchers and policymakers expect general education classroom to be the first line of defense in efforts to prevent reading difficulties. Preventing reading difficulties through evidence-based beginning reading instruction research features prominently in the 2002 No Child Left Behind legislation (NCLB; P. L. 107-110) and in the 2004 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA). The purpose of this chapter is to describe the experimental and quasi-experimental methodological approaches that have been used to examine the effects of professional development in reading on teachers’ instructional practices and students’ reading outcomes and to evaluate the chain of causal linkage in the more recent studies. The first section of the chapter provides a brief history of relevant research. The second section summarizes findings of the National Reading Panel (NRP, 2000) Report and those of a recent review of the literature (Clancy-Menchetti & Al Otaiba, 2006). The final section synthesizes what we have learned from the research.

Details

Applications of Research Methodology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-295-5

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Kimberly Judson, Denise D. Schoenbachler, Geoffrey L. Gordon, Rick E. Ridnour and Dan C. Weilbaker

The purpose of this research is to provide an empirical examination of the role of the salesperson in the new product/service development process.

4262

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to provide an empirical examination of the role of the salesperson in the new product/service development process.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was mailed to 2,650 sales managers representing US firms across the nation, and the resulting sample size consisted of 246 respondents with a response rate of 9.3 percent. The survey sample included firms with a business‐to‐business emphasis, and those with a minimum of 50 employees.

Findings

The majority of the respondents reported that salespeople are indirectly or directly involved in the new product/service development process. In spite of this contribution, many firms do not directly reward salespeople for their involvement. Offering appropriate incentives could greatly increase their efforts to collect information for new product/service idea generation.

Research limitations/implications

Suggested future research includes the perspectives of salespeople, new product development directors, etc. In addition, the study was strictly domestic and could benefit from an international focus, as well as a comparison of products versus services sectors.

Practical implications

The findings from this study can be used by managers as a benchmark for assessing sales force participation in the new product/service development, and to identify ways to encourage increased participation by the sales force with incentives.

Originality/value

Little formalized research has been conducted on the specific role that salespeople play in the new product/service development process. The findings from this study may provide strategic guidance to organizations with respect to the role of salespeople in the critical new product/service development process.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Richard Griffin

This article seeks to review the current state of workplace learning evaluation, to set out the rationale for evaluation along with the barriers that practitioners face…

2812

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to review the current state of workplace learning evaluation, to set out the rationale for evaluation along with the barriers that practitioners face when seeking to assess the effectiveness of training and development. Finally, it aims to propose a scientifically robust and practitioner friendly approach to evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is based on a multi disciplinary literature review.

Findings

Despite the substantial investment in workplace learning there is a paucity of evaluation activity. There are a wide range of reasons for this including capacity and capability issues, lack of supportive organisational environment and a lack of effective measurement instruments. There is also a large research to practice gap. The starting point for evaluation approaches should be the needs of practitioners. Latest research on training suggests that effective evaluation approaches should adopt a stakeholder and systems approach and collect corroborative data.

Research limitations/implications

This article presents research findings, based on a multidisciplinary literature review, on the factors that inhibit effective workplace learning evaluation, sets out a novel evaluation framework and approach, grounded in a conceptual model of workplace learning.

Practical implications

The findings seek to assist practitioners such as learning and development professionals undertake more robust and efficient evaluations. The article also addresses the research to practice gap.

Originality/value

This article presents a novel approach to workplace learning evaluation.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Rageshree Sinha and Akinyo Ola

The purpose of the current literature reviews to contribute to the study of organisational resilience. The study intends to understand the role of dynamic capability flow…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the current literature reviews to contribute to the study of organisational resilience. The study intends to understand the role of dynamic capability flow in creating more resilient business communities. The study tries to relate to how continuous learning enables business communities to plan for, respond to and bounce back from disasters.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured literature review of 38 empirical studies indicates organisational resilience and highlights the dynamic attributes of organisational resilience and the importance of knowledge interactions and information sharing.

Findings

Continuous learning results in complex dynamic capability manifested through research and innovations, technological implementations, social learnings and community knowledge sharing. This clearly emphasises the role of dynamic capabilities in fostering disaster resilience in organisations and business communities.

Research limitations/implications

Research limitations on continuous learning can be cited as to incorporate case study methods related to organisational experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic while also reviewing digital knowledge transfer strategies and influencing factors.

Practical implications

The study for fostering resilience in the business ecosystem needs to be embedded in the continuous learning process, and it also includes knowledge sharing and collaboration, both externally and internally, for the business community.

Social implications

Social implications for this study relate to the seamless flow of the knowledge transfer and knowledge sharing process. The dynamic process of organisational and the business community resilience is a key outcome of this knowledge sharing and knowledge transfer process.

Originality/value

A conceptual framework was developed from the review, emphasising how dynamic capabilities through continuous learning enhance business community resilience.

Details

Continuity & Resilience Review, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7502

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Jonas Karlsen Åstrøm

This study aims to investigate the factors that drive the tourist customer experience around theming. Theming is considered vital to creating a memorable customer impression.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the factors that drive the tourist customer experience around theming. Theming is considered vital to creating a memorable customer impression.

Design/methodology/approach

The cruise industry was chosen as the empirical setting. A total of 328 cruise travelers returned valid questionnaires during a cruise in March 2010. The questionnaire was developed based on a conceptual model of components (name, employee interaction, lighting, design and music) hypothesized to contribute to a themed cruise environment.

Findings

Name, employee interaction and lighting were found to be the most important drivers for the customer experience. Theming was less reliant on design and music.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to one narrow context. Further research on other ships, itineraries and cruise lines should clarify whether factors affecting theme perception are the same across the cruise industry.

Practical implications

Cruise industry decision makers should consider the naming of spaces, lighting and employee interaction when designing themed experiences.

Originality/value

Theming has received little attention in the research literature. This study is a unique contribution to our understanding of this particular field.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Bruno Papaleo, Giovanna Cangiano and Sara Calicchia

The purpose of this paper is to describe the evaluation of a training course on chemicals for occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals. The study aims were to…

1090

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the evaluation of a training course on chemicals for occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals. The study aims were to assess the effectiveness of the course; to find out what type of training met these workers' needs best, as their role is vital in the management of safety at work; and to test a qualitative assessment method using T‐LAB software for content analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

Together with traditional methods for assessing reactions and learning, a qualitative method based on interviews was used, whose content was then analyzed with software for content and text analysis (T‐LAB). The interviews were designed to bring to light critical points, training needs and the participants' expectations of this course.

Findings

The questionnaires on appreciation and learning indicated that on the whole the course was appreciated and the information provided had been learned and remembered adequately. However, qualitative evaluation brought to light some specific problems: participants' main difficulty was the practical application of what they had learned. They therefore asked primarily for technical and regulatory information, particularly guidelines and procedures, but also for training in the more complex managerial and organizational skills.

Originality/value

Qualitative methods and tools can show up better and in more detail training needs, critical points and problems that can easily be overlooked if not specifically sought. The method proposed for qualitative assessment using content analysis software gives effective, methodologically valid feedback even on small samples; it serves for assessing aspects such as the transferability and applicability of what has been learned, and its impact on work and behavior and on organization.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 November 2002

Gerald R. Ferris, Wayne A. Hochwarter, Ceasar Douglas, Fred R. Blass, Robert W. Kolodinsky and Darren C. Treadway

Social influence processes in organizations involve the demonstration of particular behavioral tactics and strategies by individuals to influence behavioral outcomes…

Abstract

Social influence processes in organizations involve the demonstration of particular behavioral tactics and strategies by individuals to influence behavioral outcomes controlled by others in ways that maximize influencer positive outcomes and minimize negative outcomes. Such processes necessarily draw from research in topic areas labeled impression management, self-presentation, interpersonal influence, and organizational politics. However, few efforts have been made to integrate this work for purposes of assessing our current knowledge base, and identifying gaps and thus areas in need of further investigation. The present paper provides a critical analysis and review of theory and research on social influence processes in the workplace, with particular emphasis on human resources systems, organized according to the What, the Where, the Who, and the How of influence. In the process, we identify neglected areas, including theory-building challenges, as well as key issues in need of empirical investigation.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-973-3

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