Search results

1 – 10 of over 6000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Simone Pettigrew and Michele Roberts

To explore mothers’ attitudes to fast food companies’ use of toy premiums as a marketing technique.

Abstract

Purpose

To explore mothers’ attitudes to fast food companies’ use of toy premiums as a marketing technique.

Design/methodology/approach

Two focus groups and 12 individual interviews were conducted with 21 mothers of young children.

Findings

The mothers considered toy premiums to be a highly effective form of marketing targeted at their children. Such purchase incentives stimulate a constant barrage of requests that parents must manage.

Research limitations/implications

If parents are to successfully perform their role of food providers to address escalating rates of childhood obesity, they need assistance to counter‐balance the highly effective forms of marketing being employed by fast food companies.

Practical implications

The findings have relevance for public policy makers in their efforts to assess the impacts of various promotional activities targeted at children. They are also useful for food marketers as they suggest how product offerings may be differentiated to better meet parents’ preferences.

Originality/value

Very little research has examined parents’ attitudes to specific marketing techniques aimed at children. Understanding the impacts of these techniques on parents’ feeding practices is critical in obtaining an appreciation for how parents can better manage their children’s diets to address rapidly escalating rates of childhood obesity.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Marianne Szymanski

Describes the types of toys needed by children of different developmental stages, their appeal for the parent, and the marketing implications. Outlines the developmental…

Abstract

Describes the types of toys needed by children of different developmental stages, their appeal for the parent, and the marketing implications. Outlines the developmental stages from infants to pre‐teens. Discusses toys for children with special needs, family games, toy collecting, and safety and care issues. Focuses on a research approach to discovering what toys meet these requirements; this is based on observational research and a pen‐and‐paper survey, and establishes a composite “Toy Tips” rating based on fun rating (always the most important toy factor), plus other development scores for thinking skills, character development, social skills and motor skills.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2005

Christopher Byrne

Recalls the hot toys phenomenon of several past Christmases in the USA, such as for Cabbage Patch dolls and Power Rangers. Argues that such toys created headlines in order…

Abstract

Recalls the hot toys phenomenon of several past Christmases in the USA, such as for Cabbage Patch dolls and Power Rangers. Argues that such toys created headlines in order to gain publicity, but also that this trend appears to have died because of eBay: what made toys hot and a cultural event was their inaccessibility, but eBay makes them all accessible for those willing to pay the price. Continues with how toys have changed: the old barriers between adults’ real objects (like trains) and children’s toy objects (toy trains) no longer applies to computers and iPods, and instead of toy versions there are simpler versions of, for instance camcorders, which nevertheless work. Shows how companies now know how to design products which make children feel part of the adult world but are also appropriate to their ages: examples are the “Chat Now” closed‐system walkie talkie with cellphone features, and mobile phones with parental controls. Concludes with how adults too enjoy working toys like iPods: not only are there KGOY (Kids Getting Older Younger) but ANGU (Adults Not Growing Up).

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Duracell

Reports the Duracell survey of favourite toy purchases in nine European countries, and how it is conducted. Lists and comments on the top 10 toys Europe‐wide: Tecnitoys…

Abstract

Reports the Duracell survey of favourite toy purchases in nine European countries, and how it is conducted. Lists and comments on the top 10 toys Europe‐wide: Tecnitoys’ SCX Monza Set, Smoby’s Star Party CD, Smoby’s No.1 football table, Zapf Creation’s My Model, Game Boy Advance SP, Smoby’s Ma Palette Beaute, Konami’s Battle Accel, LEGO Dirt Crusher, Geomag Panels 220pcs, and Giochi Preziosi’s Robosapiens. Moves on to findings from the qualitative research conducted with children and parents: playing with toys remains the favourite leisure activity, pocket money normally starts at six years old, 58 per cent of children save money from gifts, children attend an average of eight birthday parties a year and spend 13 Euros on the host’s present, Toys “R” Us is their favourite toy store, and they receive an average of seven toys at Christmas and four or five on their birthday.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Ruth Clement

Explains recent attitude research by toy manufacturer Mattel into the need states and drivers of mothers with young children, and the impact of this on toy ownership…

Abstract

Explains recent attitude research by toy manufacturer Mattel into the need states and drivers of mothers with young children, and the impact of this on toy ownership. Outlines the changes in family life and how this affects attitudes to, and purchase of, toys: mothers often return to work relatively soon after having children, they welcome advice on parenting from their own mothers, family and friends, and they are concerned with the balance between protecting their children and fear of spoiling them. Looks at mothers’ attitudes to child rearing and development, and the role of toys in aiding this; working mums with less time to spend with their children tended to have and consider essential a wider range of toy types than did non‐working mothers, and books were seen as the most essential toy.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2004

Heidi L. Malloy and Paula McMurray-Schwarz

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on war play and aggression. The paper begins with an introduction to play and the theories of Piaget, Vygotsky, and…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on war play and aggression. The paper begins with an introduction to play and the theories of Piaget, Vygotsky, and Corsaro. This is followed by a definition of pretend aggression and the war play debate. Literature is reviewed on how violent television, war toys, and war play shapes children’s imaginary play and aggressive behaviors. Attention is also given to the teacher’s role in war play and the methods used to investigate war play. Suggestions are made for future approaches to the study of war play within the context of the peer culture. The paper concludes with implications for early childhood educators.

Details

Social Contexts of Early Education, and Reconceptualizing Play (II)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-146-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 June 2020

Sian Jones, Leanne Ali, Mohona Bhuyan, Laura Dalnoki, Alicia Kaliff, William Muir, Kiia Uusitalo and Clare Uytman

This study aimed to look at parents' perceptions of a number of different toy prototypes that represented physical impairments and predictors of these perceptions.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to look at parents' perceptions of a number of different toy prototypes that represented physical impairments and predictors of these perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

A correlational survey design was used. Parents of children aged 4–10 years who identified their child as having a disability (n = 160) and not as having a disability (n = 166) took part. They rated a number of prototypes for likelihood that their child would enjoy playing with them and completed measures of their responses toward children with disabilities and of their own and their child's direct contact with people with disabilities.

Findings

It was found that, among parents of children who did not declare that their child had a disability, the more open the parents were toward disability, the more contact the children had with other children with disabilities and the more likely they were to consider that their child would like to play with a toy prototype representing a physical impairment. This pattern of results was not found among parents who identified their child as having a disability, where instead positive friendship intentions of parents mediated this association.

Research limitations/implications

These findings have implications for theories informing the positive benefits of disability representation.

Practical implications

These findings indicate different paths through which parents might be moved to purchase toys that represent physical impairments for their children.

Social implications

These findings suggest that representative toys might be associated with an open dialogue around the topic of disability.

Originality/value

This is the first study of the responses of parents to toys that represent physical impairments known to the authors.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2020

Claire Lambert and Edmund Goh

This industry viewpoint paper provides a comprehensive overview and critical viewpoint on the use of collectable toy premiums via instant reward programs (IRP) within the…

Abstract

Purpose

This industry viewpoint paper provides a comprehensive overview and critical viewpoint on the use of collectable toy premiums via instant reward programs (IRP) within the retail industry as a marketing tool.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws upon the uses of a “free” collectable toy premium promotion with a fixed purchase spend (via an IRP) in the supermarket industry as a marketing instrument to increase customer basket spend and repeat visits. Reflections on the recent use of toy premiums by Australian supermarket retailers are also utilised to highlight the ingredients for a successful promotion but also the controversies associated with such promotions.

Findings

One of the key findings suggest that the role of toy premiums is a successful marketing tool by retailers to increase customer total basket spending. However, notable points of caution regarding offering IRPs incorporating collectable toy premiums promotions are established, including environmental concerns and the social, ethical dilemma as to whether these promotions are indirectly targeted at children rather than adult consumers.

Practical implications

The findings have important implications for retailers to attract customer attention, increased market spend and repeat purchases through a desired collectable premium promotion (via an IRP).

Originality/value

This is the first paper to critically review the usage of collectable toy premiums within the supermarket retail industry.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Syed Tariq Anwar

The aim of this study is to investigate and analyze product recalls and product-harm crises in the US toy industry, which is a major area in marketing and firms'…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to investigate and analyze product recalls and product-harm crises in the US toy industry, which is a major area in marketing and firms' competitiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

By using longitudinal data from the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the paper uses content analysis to compare and contrast toy recalls, product hazards and country of origin issues of 721 toy recalls in the US market between 1974 and 2008, covering 270 million recalled toys.

Findings

Findings of this work reveal that most of the recalled toys were manufactured in China, although a wide variety of toy brands were designed in the USA. Major hazards of toy recalls included choking, lead poisoning, aspiration, fire/burn and other injuries.

Research limitations/implications

The study relied on the CPSC's data that seemed representative of the toy industry in the US market, but missed other markets of Europe and Asia. Also, there was availability of detailed data in sub-categories of the toy industry.

Practical implications

The paper provides useful academic and managerial implications that can help us understand the issues of product recalls and product-harm crises.

Social implications

Toys are one of the most widely available products in the world; the industry is a $50 billion industry and has transformed itself from a small-scale business sector into a well-established industry.

Originality/value

This investigation is particularly important in the areas of firm-specific competitiveness, business ethics and regulatory and societal issues.

Details

Competitiveness Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Anna Sparrman

The purpose of this paper is to understand, from children's perspectives, the commercial marketing strategy of selling breakfast cereals with “insert toys” targeted at children.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand, from children's perspectives, the commercial marketing strategy of selling breakfast cereals with “insert toys” targeted at children.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on four focus group interviews conducted with 16 children (8‐9 years of age) concerning 18 different breakfast cereal packages. The theoretical framework integrates childhood sociology, critical discourse analysis and talk‐in‐interaction. This theoretical and methodological combination is used to show how children, in local micro settings of talk, make use of the discourses that are available to them to produce and reproduce social and cultural values about marketing with “insert toys”.

Findings

The present findings suggest that, from children's perspectives, “insert toys” are constituted by cultural and social patterns extending far beyond the “insert toy” itself. For example, the analysis shows that it is not biological age that defines what and how consumption is understood.

Research limitations/implications

The focus group material provides understandings of marketing strategies and consumption practices from children's perspectives. When the children talk about children and adults, hybrid agents of the “child‐adult”, the “adult‐child” and the “childish child” are constructed. These hybrids contradict research that dichotomizes children and adults likewise children's understandings of consumption based on age stages. Accordingly, age is rationalized into an empirically investigated category rather than being used as a preset category set out to explain children's behaviours.

Originality/value

Analysis of the focus group interactions shows that the way the market and marketing as well as children and adults are talked about is crucial to understanding children's and parents' actions as consumers.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 6000