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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Azizul Hassan and Mizan Rahman

The purpose of this paper is to argue that the World Heritage Site (WHS) status as a label plays an important role in branding, creating awareness among the tourists and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that the World Heritage Site (WHS) status as a label plays an important role in branding, creating awareness among the tourists and promoting a specific place – be it natural or cultural.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on qualitative research and utilised interviews and explanatory case study method, taking Maritime Greenwich WHS as a case.

Findings

It is found that the status of WHS motivates the tourists in general and heritage tourists in particular to visit the case study site. Also, the status helps in boosting the level of confidence of the tourists while selecting the site. Overall, it helps to reinforce the identity of a place. However, sustainability and conservation should not take a back seat when the very purpose of branding a site as WHS is this.

Originality/value

It is ideal to have a balance in managing the demand and supply side of place management and marketing making sure that the heritage value and trust is kept intact.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

András Bozány

Although heritage sites are numerous, facility management (FM) is maybe the most important process in heritage site management systems. The similarities and differences of…

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Abstract

Purpose

Although heritage sites are numerous, facility management (FM) is maybe the most important process in heritage site management systems. The similarities and differences of the sites should be considered before implementing common FM information systems that support more heritage sites with various area types. The presented classifications are collected and made primarily to support this process. Specialties of heritage sites were also observed from FM point of view. The paper attempts to identify a few groups that can be used well for FM system installations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper observes the sites from several points of view. The sites are classified by heritage types, by facility planning point of view, by fragmentation and the rate of built‐in area, by human influence, by application. It offers three methods for area classification, later the computerized supporting systems are observed.

Findings

On most heritage sites FM is probably the most important management process. These cultural and natural sites are handled usually by governmental authorities and/or such organizations that can serve more sites permanently.

Research limitations/implications

Since, the heritage sites are various, there might be several exceptional cases that are not collected in this paper.

Practical implications

The paper offers guidelines and ideas to enhance the FM system implementation on different types of heritage sites. Using these groupings, several problems can be identified early in the planning phase of such information systems.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to present the diversity of the objects on the heritage sites, trying to categorize them for FM purposes from more viewpoints. Most of these sites are currently not applied with efficient FM support.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 December 2018

Zuraini Md Ali, Rodiah Zawawi, Nik Elyna Myeda and Nabila Mohamad

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the impacts that the adaptive reuse of historical building has on museum service quality by analysing the visitors’ expectations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the impacts that the adaptive reuse of historical building has on museum service quality by analysing the visitors’ expectations and perceptions through the HISTOQUAL model. It looks deeper into investigating the enhancement of adaptive reuse approach to historical buildings not only to the surrounding environment, but also to the building’s cultural significance.

Design/methodology/approach

A field survey implementing quantitative approach was conducted by using questionnaires to collect the visitors’ expectations and perceptions on their visits to the selected case study sites. The selected two case study sites are both newly adaptive reuse museums located in the heart of Kuala Lumpur. Through these case studies, the visitors’ expectations and perceptions were analysed and the differences were identified.

Findings

Positive feedback on the level of service quality provided at both museums indirectly shows the success of adaptive reuse initiative on the historical buildings towards adapting their new functions as a museum. It was also noted that foreign language leaflets and facilities for less able visitors were among the two service criteria that do not exceed the expectations of users. In general, these findings are crucial in identifying the gap within the services provided and appropriate measures that can be undertaken for further improvement.

Research limitations/implications

Further study can be employed to a larger population of study to cater for a variety of perspectives from both users and managers of the buildings.

Practical implications

This paper highlights the implications of users’ feedback towards building usability and functions. It provided imperative findings from the users’ point of view pertaining to the services provided.

Social implications

The paper illustrates the significance of social perceptions on the implications of service delivery. It also reports empirical evidence in highlighting the importance of users’ attributes towards excellent service delivery.

Originality/value

Up to present, there exists a small number of studies that look into reviewing the new functions of adaptive reuse buildings. This study now contributes to create a larger number of studies in this scope, especially within the context of Malaysia.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Abstract

Subject area

Hospitality and Tourism.

Study level/applicability

Senior undergraduate level and graduate level.

Case overview

This case study charts out the development of a business plan for Ch’ulel Mendoza, a hypothetical all-villa resort nestled against the Andes Mountains, where guests enjoy luxurious wine-infused spa treatments. The business plan has to be comprehensive because it should become the basis of a turnkey project for potential investors. Ch’ulel Mendoza is surrounded by the lush vineyards of some of the most famous wine estates in Argentina. The spa, facilities and services pay homage to the wine-growing heritage of the region, promoting wine to its guests as both pleasurable for consumption and conducive to healthy living. The architectural design speaks directly to the vines themselves: the earth-covered spa is where guests soak up the healing nutrients in the vinotherapy and water treatments, much like the roots are nourished by the elements and water in the soil; the resort area embraces the outdoors with decks, open patios and pools where guests can bask in the sun and enjoy other natural elements, just like the grape plants themselves. Once it becomes operational, Ch’ulel Mendoza will symbolize a blend of wellness, recreation and the charm of the Latin American culture.

Expected learning outcomes

Develop a comprehensive business plan for a new business, understand the business environment, prepare a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and weaknesses analysis, develop functional (marketing, finance, human resources, operations, etc.) plans and understand the opportunities and challenges in the new product development process.

Subject code

CSS: 12: Tourism and Hospitality.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2022

Yuliani Dwi Lestari, Faridatus Saidah and Aghnia Nadhira Aliya Putri

This paper aims to explore the effect of three destination competitiveness attributes: core resources and attractors, supporting factors and destination management on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the effect of three destination competitiveness attributes: core resources and attractors, supporting factors and destination management on the tourist perceived behavioral control, perceived value, trust and tourists’ intention to visit halal tourism destination in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative data is collected by conducting an online survey. Using data from 244 Muslim respondents in Indonesia, this study applies a partial least square-structural equation modeling to test and estimate relationships among variables.

Findings

The results show that perceived behavioral control, perceived value and trust directly influences the intention to visit halal tourism. Subsequently, supporting factors also directly affect the intention to visit halal tourism, whereas the other attributes of destination competitiveness that is core resources and attractors and destination management have an indirect relationship or act as mediating variable to the intention. Destination management performs as a driving force of intention to visit halal tourism through the three variables, namely, perceived behavioral control, perceived value and trust. Meanwhile, core resources and attractors only have an indirect relationship through trust.

Research limitations/implications

There are limitations of the data collection, the respondent of the survey in this study is Muslim tourist, for wider range of region the study should also be conduct not only for Muslim respondent but also non-Muslim respondent to get comprehensive data of halal tourism market in Indonesia.

Practical implications

This study provides insights to the government and stakeholders about domestic tourist intentions toward halal tourism destinations. This study also makes some recommendations for elements that can be used to increase tourist acknowledgement of halal tourism, acquire the domestic tourist market and increase state revenue through halal tourism.

Social implications

This study has substantial implications; halal tourism in Indonesia has a promising economic future. The tourism industry is not only intended to increase government revenue but has also contributed to environmental sustainability. The study reveals the significance of destination management in halal tourism. Hence, to make Indonesia a leading country in halal tourism, Indonesia needs to fulfill the tourism destination competitiveness among others to implement sustainable tourism and enhance the infrastructure, promotion, services and environmental aspects.

Originality/value

This study offers a framework model related to halal tourism focus on destination competitiveness as part of the knowledge contributions. Besides, the findings of the study can be the references for the stakeholders to take any strategic decision with regards to attract tourists’ intention to visit halal tourism destinations.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2020

Dileep Kumar M., Normala S. Govindarajo and Mae Ho Seok Khen

Tourism researchers proposed that service quality dimensions of tourist destinations can contribute in developing a favorable or unfavorable image among travelers which…

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Abstract

Purpose

Tourism researchers proposed that service quality dimensions of tourist destinations can contribute in developing a favorable or unfavorable image among travelers which affect visitors’ loyalty or disloyalty as well as destination image. However, such claims are seldom evaluated into in avitourism locations, which are a niche tourism, but fast growing. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between service quality, visitor satisfaction and destination image and destination loyalty among avian tourists.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a positivist research philosophy with a quantitative, cross-sectional descriptive study design, the study addressed five direct and two indirect relationships in the model. The research followed expectation dis-confirmation theory of Gartner to test the theoretical model. Following purposive sampling, a sample of 384 international avitourists was collected from five avitourism locations of Malaysia. The study applied SmartPLS SEM to analyze the data.

Findings

The results show that the service quality provided by the park management has a positive impact on visitor satisfaction, destination image and destination loyalty. The study also shows partial mediation effect of visitor satisfaction on destination image and destination loyalty among avitourists. The study extends practical, policy and theoretical implications to the stakeholders of avitourism.

Research limitations/implications

The study limits the possibility for generalization of the findings into five avitourism sites located in three states of Malaysia. Hence, the scope of the study needs to be augmented with samples from more regions to meet the expected generalization. Add to the point, this study lacks qualitative data observations to get an in-depth understanding of the issues pertaining to visitor’s expectations on serviced quality, satisfaction, destination image and loyalty. Hence, it is suggested that more qualitative research interventions need to be made with the tools of in-depth interviews, content analysis and with the method of focus group discussions and Delphi applications.

Practical implications

This study provides the park management a clearer understanding on service quality critical factors in enhancing the satisfaction of avian tourists and building a better avitourism destination image and destination loyalty. The avitourism park management may look into the services for these niche tourists, as these resources are directly linked to nature-based tourism with its diverse requirements to keep visitors satisfied. Park authorities require a sound understanding and skills in managing the biodiversity of the natural resources, birds and animals, to match their services with tourists’ expectations.

Social implications

Biodiversity is important in supporting vital ecosystem services (ES) for human as well as animals. The study has its social implications in generating a greater number of employment opportunity for people surrounding the area of avian destinations preserving the biodiverse area. The people in the surroundings area of avitourism locations will get better employment opportunity as guides and nature trail experts, if the avian tourism develops in its real principle.

Originality/value

Avitourism is a niche tourism. The expectations of the visitors of avitourism locations are entirely varied in comparison with general tourism. Very less studies focused into expectations of the visitors linking human factor of service quality, emotional intelligence, visitor satisfaction, etc. like dimensions that will contribute into dynamic destination image and destination loyalty among avitourists. With the support of quantitative research tools, representative sampling and theoretical selection, the study findings are original in their form, ensuring external validity further to generalize into other birdwatching locations across the countries. The study observations are highly valuable to all stakeholders of avitourism.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Mark Anthony Camilleri

This chapter introduces its readers to the concept of tourism. It sheds light on the rationale for tourism, as it explains the tourists’ inherent motivations to travel. It…

Abstract

This chapter introduces its readers to the concept of tourism. It sheds light on the rationale for tourism, as it explains the tourists’ inherent motivations to travel. It also describes different aspects that together make up the tourism industry. Tourists travel to destinations that are accessible to them. They require accommodation if they are visiting a place for more than 24 hours. Leisure and business travellers may also visit attractions, and engage in recreational activities. Hence, the tourist destinations should have the right amenities and facilities. In this light, this chapter clarifies how destinations may offer different products to satisfy a wide array of tourists. Tourism products can include urban (or city) tourism, seaside tourism, rural tourism, ecotourism, wine tourism, culinary tourism, health tourism, medical tourism, religious tourism, cultural (or heritage) tourism, sports tourism, educational tourism, business tourism (including meetings, incentives, conferences and events), among others.

Article
Publication date: 7 February 2022

Sunita Guru, Anamika Sinha and Pradeep Kautish

The study aims to facilitate the medical tourists visiting emerging countries for various kinds of ailments by ranking the possible destinations to avail medical treatments.

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to facilitate the medical tourists visiting emerging countries for various kinds of ailments by ranking the possible destinations to avail medical treatments.

Design/methodology/approach

A Fuzzy Analytical Hierarchical Process (FAHP) with a mixed-method approach is applied to analyze data collected from patients and substantiate it with medical tour operators in India to gain managerial insights on the choice-making patterns of the patients.

Findings

India is a preferred emerging market location due to the low cost and high medical staff quality. India offers value for money, whereas Singapore and Thailand are preferred destinations for quality and technology.

Research limitations/implications

The study will facilitate the emerging markets' governments, hospitals and medical tourists to understand the importance of various determinants responsible for availing medical treatment outside their country.

Practical implications

The study recommends that cost and quality care are the patients' prime focus; government policies must provide clear guidelines on what the hospitals and country environment can offer and accordingly align the marketing strategies.

Originality/value

This study is the first attempt to rank various factors affecting medical tourism using the FAHP approach.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 July 2018

Fabio Cassia, Vania Vigolo, Marta Maria Ugolini and Rossella Baratta

City image has been defined as the sum of beliefs, ideas and impressions people hold regarding a city. While abundant literature has explored city image from tourists

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Abstract

Purpose

City image has been defined as the sum of beliefs, ideas and impressions people hold regarding a city. While abundant literature has explored city image from tourists’ perspectives, few studies have explored residents’ perceptions, and even fewer have compared city image as perceived by tourists and residents. In addition, very few studies have compared tourists’ and residents’ perceptions of city image in small- to medium-sized destinations. Considering these research gaps, the purpose of this paper is to address city image in a medium-sized destination, Verona, in northern Italy with three specific objectives: to examine residents’ perceptions of the city of Verona’s image; to examine tourists’ perceptions of the city of Verona’s image and to compare the perceptions of the two groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted through questionnaires collected among residents and tourists in Verona. Questionnaires were based on a multi-item scale addressing four dimensions of the city image.

Findings

The findings show that residents and tourists hold similar perceptions of city image regarding services and leisure, security and entertainment. The only significant difference in city image concerns the municipal facilities. Specifically, residents are more critical than tourists about this dimension of city image.

Practical implications

The research provides useful implications for policy makers and destination management organisations, and shows some strengths and weaknesses of Verona.

Originality/value

The study addresses the image of a medium-sized city that is typical in the Italian context, thus enhancing knowledge about city image. In addition, by testing and enhancing a scale previously used only to measure residents’ perceptions, the study provides a common measurement instrument to compare tourists’ and residents’ perceptions.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

M. Manente, V. Minghetti and E. Celotto

Tourism and transport represent two sides of the same management process, especially in tourism destinations characterised by a consistent or a rising volume of visitor flows.

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Abstract

Tourism and transport represent two sides of the same management process, especially in tourism destinations characterised by a consistent or a rising volume of visitor flows.

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