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1 – 10 of 246
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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Abstract

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Assembly Automation, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Steffen Nowotny, Robert Muenster, Siegfried Scharek and Eckhard Beyer

Laser materials processing system technology has become indispensible to the tool and die manufacturing industries and for repairing engines and turbines. The laser

Abstract

Purpose

Laser materials processing system technology has become indispensible to the tool and die manufacturing industries and for repairing engines and turbines. The laser build‐up welding process especially is now a standard technology where cost efficient, precisely localized and near net shape repair welds are required. The concept of integrating the modular laser components into standard machine tools makes the technology easily accessible to the user and very efficiently combines build‐up welding and metal‐cutting processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Specially designed laser system technology is available as add‐on kits for different machine tools of the end‐users. They can choose from a large variety of laser sources, manufacturing heads, welding material supply as well as process control devices. User‐friendly software guides through the entire process chain. So, optimized laser systems for different cladding and build‐up applications can be installed easily and inexpensively in common turning and milling machines.

Findings

The laser integration into machine tools connects efficiently laser and mechanical finish operations. This way, repairs, rapid design changes, and direct manufacturing of parts are available with a high level of accuracy and in very short times. Additionally, exactly specified property profiles can be realized.

Originality/value

The laser application shown here represents a new technical solution of laser integration into machine tools, which offers an efficient complete machining. It allows to quickly switch between milling and laser processing, which simplifies the combination of both processes. The computer numerical controlled process control treats the laser head just like a milling tool. This shortens the machining time and expands the capability of the machine with respect to generating multiple shapes.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Thomas Himmer, Anja Techel, Steffen Nowotny and Eckhard Beyer

Time reduction and quick geometrical changes of complex components and tools are currently the most important demands in product development. The manufacturing process…

Abstract

Time reduction and quick geometrical changes of complex components and tools are currently the most important demands in product development. The manufacturing process presented in this paper is based on multiple additive and subtractive technologies such as laser cutting, laser welding, direct laser metal deposition and CNC milling. The process chain is similar to layer‐based Rapid Prototyping Techniques. In the first step, the 3D CAD geometry is sliced into layers by a specially developed software. These slices are cut by high speed laser cutting and then joined together. In this way laminated tools or parts are built. To improve surface quality and to increase wear resistance a CNC machining center is used. The system consists of a CNC milling machine, in which a 3 kW Nd:YAG laser, a coaxial powder nozzle and a digitizing system are integrated.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Jian Gao, Janet Folkes, Oguzhan Yilmaz and Nabil Gindy

The aim of the paper is to provide an economically viable solution for the blade repair process. There is a continual increase in the repair market, which requires an…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to provide an economically viable solution for the blade repair process. There is a continual increase in the repair market, which requires an increased level of specialised technology to reduce the repair cost and to increase productivity of the process.Design/methodology/approach – This paper introduces the aerospace component defects to be repaired. Current repair technologies including building‐up and machining technology are reviewed. Through the analysis of these available technologies, this paper proposes an integrated repair strategy through information integration and processes concentration.Findings – Provides detailed description and discussion for the repair system, including 3D digitising system, repair inspection, reverse engineering‐based polygonal modelling, and adaptive laser cladding and adaptive machining process.Originality/value – This paper describes a 3D non‐contact measurement‐based repair integration system, and provides a solution to create an individual blade‐oriented nominal model to achieve adaptive repair process (laser cladding/machining) and automated inspection.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 77 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Abstract

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 53 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Anna Kochan

Reports from the 2004 Automotive Laser Applications Workshop in Plymouth, MI on the keynote presentation given by Klaus Loeffler, Volkswagen's joining specialist. Outlines…

Abstract

Reports from the 2004 Automotive Laser Applications Workshop in Plymouth, MI on the keynote presentation given by Klaus Loeffler, Volkswagen's joining specialist. Outlines the extent of Volkswagen's use of laser welding to build cars at both assembly plants in Germany and elsewhere.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Abstract

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

K.P. Karunakaran, Alain Bernard, S. Suryakumar, Lucas Dembinski and Georges Taillandier

The purpose of this paper is to review additive and/or subtractive manufacturing methods for metallic objects and their gradual evolution from prototyping tools to rapid…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review additive and/or subtractive manufacturing methods for metallic objects and their gradual evolution from prototyping tools to rapid manufacture of actual parts.

Design/methodology/approach

Various existing rapid manufacturing (RM) methods have been classified into six groups, namely, CNC machining laminated manufacturing, powder‐bed technologies, deposition technologies, hybrid technologies and rapid casting technologies and discussed in detail. The RM methods have been further classified, based on criteria such as material, raw material form, energy source, etc. The process capabilities springing from these classifications are captured in the form of a table, which acts as a database.

Findings

Due to the approximation in RM in exchange for total automation, a variety of multi‐faceted and hybrid approaches has to be adopted. This study helps in choosing the appropriate RM process among these myriad technologies.

Originality/value

This review facilitates identification of appropriate RM process for a given situation and sets the framework for design for RM.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

T. Tobita, K. Niki, K. Inouye and H. Takasago

Advanced laser micromachining techniques for a TFT‐LCD (thin film transistor‐liquid crystal display) module have been developed to repair various kinds of defects such as…

Abstract

Advanced laser micromachining techniques for a TFT‐LCD (thin film transistor‐liquid crystal display) module have been developed to repair various kinds of defects such as shorts, opens, and degraded TFTs. They have also been designed to analyse failures in the TFT‐LCD. The techniques are as follows: (i) The technique of zapping the excess metal: to repair short defects and/or to isolate the TFT being tested from the adjacent TFTs. This uses a pulse Xe or a Q‐switched YAG laser. (ii) Zapping, followed by the metal deposition technique: to repair open defects and/or to form electrical testing electrodes. This uses a Q‐switched YLF and an Ar ion laser. (iii) The technique of micro‐welding two metal lines separated by an insulating layer: to repair open defects. This uses a Q‐switched YAG laser. (iv) A separation technique utilised on a TFT‐LCD panel adhered with epoxy resin. This uses a pulse Excimer laser. (v) A micro‐annealing technique for a degraded TFT: to recover the TFT characteristics. This uses a Q‐switched YAG laser. Through the study described above, the authors have confirmed that these techniques are highly effective for obtaining TFT‐LCD modules without defects. The yield of TFT‐LCD modules may therefore be expected to improve.

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2017

Renwei Liu, Zhiyuan Wang, Todd Sparks, Frank Liou and Cedo Nedic

This paper aims to investigate a stereo vision-based hybrid (additive and subtractive) manufacturing process using direct laser metal deposition, computer numerical…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate a stereo vision-based hybrid (additive and subtractive) manufacturing process using direct laser metal deposition, computer numerical control (CNC) machining and in-process scanning to repair metallic components automatically. The focus of this work was to realize automated alignment and adaptive tool path generation that can repair metallic components after a single setup.

Design/methodology/approach

Stereo vision was used to detect the defect area for automated alignment. After the defect is located, a laser displacement sensor is used to scan the defect area before and after laser metal deposition. The scan is then processed by an adaptive algorithm to generate a tool path for repairing the defect.

Findings

The hybrid manufacturing processes for repairing metallic component combine the advantages of free-form fabrication from additive manufacturing with the high-accuracy offered by CNC machining. A Ti-6Al-4V component with a manufacturing defect was repaired by the proposed process. Compared to previous research on repairing worn components, introducing stereo vision and laser scanning dramatically simplifies the manual labor required to extract and reconstruct the defect area’s geometry.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates an automated metallic component repair process by integrating stereo vision and a laser displacement sensor into a hybrid manufacturing system. Experimental results and microstructure analysis shows that the defect area could be repaired feasibly and efficiently with acceptable heat affected zone using the proposed approach.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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