Search results

1 – 9 of 9
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Tony Newbold

At a time when technology enables more information than ever before to be disseminated faster then ever before, and markets and organisational goalposts rapidly change…

Abstract

At a time when technology enables more information than ever before to be disseminated faster then ever before, and markets and organisational goalposts rapidly change, there is increasing dependence on networks to meet both strategic and personal needs. This paper explores how to overcome common individual and organisational barriers to networking. It examines the personal and strategic drivers for networking, before studying the practical steps organisations can take to: — prepare their culture for networking — promote the skills needed — give employees practical tools to identify and develop networks.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Tony Manning, Graham Pogson and Zoe Morrison

The paper aims to present and discuss research into the relationship between influencing behaviour and impact, including gender and seniority differences.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to present and discuss research into the relationship between influencing behaviour and impact, including gender and seniority differences.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds on previous articles considering influencing behaviour in the workplace. These articles present a model of interpersonal influence and describe how individual influencing behaviour varies in different contexts. They identified the need for further investigation into the effectiveness of such behaviours in those contexts. This research utilises 360‐degree performance assessments as an indicator of the “effectiveness” or impact of workplace influencing behaviours.

Findings

The findings extend previous work supporting the idea that there are few, if any, influencing behaviours that apply to all situations and highlight the role of expectancies in work place assessments of influencing behaviours.

Research limitations/implications

The research highlights ways in which the relationship between influencing behaviour and impact differ according to both the gender and seniority of those seeking to influence. This indicates that the “expectancies” of the influence or target affect perceptions of influencing behaviour and assessments of impact. This is consistent with the model of interpersonal influence previously developed, which includes explicit reference to feedback loops between behaviour, responses and expectancies. This raises further questions as to the impact of expectancies on 360‐degree assessment, and the nature and fairness of assessment within organisational performance management systems.

Originality/value

This paper challenges the idea that there are influencing strategies and styles that are effective, irrespective of context. It also highlights the role of expectancies within behavioural assessments in the workplace.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Ron Hyams and Tony Page

Organisations have become looser as expectations of working life, markets and organisations themselves have changed. In order to restore the “glue” necessary for success…

Abstract

Organisations have become looser as expectations of working life, markets and organisations themselves have changed. In order to restore the “glue” necessary for success, teambuilding must be implemented. The means of achieving this are discussed, involving a positive approach to the Five Rs, Reason, Results, Roles, Routine and Review, absence of which will lead to underperforming and lack of co‐ordination.

Details

Employee Councelling Today, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 29 February 2008

Michael P. Clements and David F. Hendry

In recent work, we have developed a theory of economic forecasting for empirical econometric models when there are structural breaks. This research shows that…

Abstract

In recent work, we have developed a theory of economic forecasting for empirical econometric models when there are structural breaks. This research shows that well-specified models may forecast poorly, whereas it is possible to design forecasting devices more immune to the effects of breaks. In this chapter, we summarise key aspects of that theory, describe the models and data, then provide an empirical illustration of some of these developments when the goal is to generate sequences of inflation forecasts over a long historical period, starting with the model of annual inflation in the UK over 1875–1991 in Hendry (2001a).

Details

Forecasting in the Presence of Structural Breaks and Model Uncertainty
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-540-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III…

Abstract

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III, contains features to help the reader to retrieve relevant literature from MCB University Press' considerable output. Each entry within has been indexed according to author(s) and the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus. The latter thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid retrieval. Each article or book is assigned its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. This Volume indexes 29 journals indicating the depth, coverage and expansion of MCB's portfolio.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 October 2009

Carlos Maria F‐Jardón and Maria Susana Martos

There are different models to measure the effect of intellectual capital on firm performance. These models depend on different dimensions of intellectual capital, the…

Abstract

Purpose

There are different models to measure the effect of intellectual capital on firm performance. These models depend on different dimensions of intellectual capital, the interrelations between them and the effects on performance. It is important to analyze several specificities in small and medium sized enterprises (SME) in developing countries. This paper aims to test diverse models to verify the previously mentioned relations applied to wood manufacturer SMEs of Oberá (Argentina).

Design/methodology/approach

A global model including the variables used in the previous literature is used. The paper establishes hypotheses for testing this model and us PLS technique to estimate the parameters of the model in a sample of 113 wood manufacturer SMEs in Oberá (Argentina).

Findings

The only dimension of intellectual capital directly affecting performance is structural capital. The other dimensions exert an indirect effect through structural capital.

Research limitations/implications

The model does not use all the possible variables to characterize intellectual capital. The causality elements cannot be verified in a temporary horizon because the data are cross‐sectional. In addition, when making reference to data of a particular period of time, there may be causes that imply relations of accidental type. Moreover, the measures used were subjective. This paper only studies the SMEs of the Argentine wood industry.

Practical implications

The paper offers several suggestions to implement strategies for local SMEs and to support aid to projects for developing countries.

Originality/value

The paper tests different models to analyze the impact of dimensions of intellectual capital on performance in SMEs of developing countries and provides information on the wood manufacturer SMEs in Argentina.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the…

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

James Temitope Dada

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of asymmetric structure inherent in exchange rate volatility on trade in sub-Saharan African countries from 2005 to 2017.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of asymmetric structure inherent in exchange rate volatility on trade in sub-Saharan African countries from 2005 to 2017.

Design/methodology/approach

17 countries in sub-Saharan African Countries are used for the study. Exchange rate volatility is generated using generalised autoregressive conditional heteroscedacity (1,1), while the asymmetric components of exchange rate volatility are generated using a refined approach of cumulative partial sum developed by Granger and Yoon (2002). Two-step generalised method of moments is used as the estimation technique in order to address the problem of endogeneity, commonly found in panel data.

Findings

The result from the study shows the evidence of exchange rate volatility clustering which is strictly persistent in sub-Saharan African countries. The asymmetric components (positive and negative shocks) of exchange rate volatility have negative and significant effect on trade in the region. Meanwhile, the effect of negative exchange rate volatility is higher on trade when compared with the positive exchange rate volatility. Furthermore, real exchange rate has negative and significant effect on trade in sub-Saharan African countries.

Research limitations/implications

The outcomes of this study are important for participants in foreign exchange market. As investors in foreign exchange market react more to the negative news than positive news, investors need to diversify their risk. Also, regulators in the market need to formulate appropriate macroeconomic policies that will stabilize exchange rate in the region.

Originality/value

This study deviates from extant studies in the literature by incorporating asymmetric structure into the exchange rate trade nexus using a refined approach.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

1 – 9 of 9