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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Tony Hernández and David Bennison

Although formal techniques of locational analysis have been available for over 50 years, most retailers traditionally made no use of them, relying instead on intuition…

Abstract

Although formal techniques of locational analysis have been available for over 50 years, most retailers traditionally made no use of them, relying instead on intuition guided by experience and “common sense”. However, the simultaneous advent in the last 15 years of low cost computing and the increasing availability of retail related data of all types has given retailers the opportunity to take a much more rational approach to decision making. This paper examines the extent to which retailers have taken advantage of the potential released by these developments, and adopted more “scientific” rules based methodologies. The analysis is based on an extensive questionnaire survey of UK retailers conducted in 1998 which encompassed organisations operating altogether more than 50,000 outlets across eight sectors. The survey sought to identify the use made both of particular types of techniques, and of Geographical Information Systems, which act as a platform for them. It was complemented by a series of in‐depth interviews with location specialists in a number of major retail organisations.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 31 October 2019

Hernandez allegations.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB247446

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Expert briefing
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Outlook for the government of President Juan Orlando Hernandez.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB214795

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Lorena R. Romero-Domínguez

Purpose: This chapter explores the current hybridization between true crime and nonfiction investigative documentaries on Video on Demand (VOD) platforms. It would seem…

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter explores the current hybridization between true crime and nonfiction investigative documentaries on Video on Demand (VOD) platforms. It would seem necessary to distinguish true crime productions from long-form journalistic documentaries in order to avoid confusion between different products that do not pursue the same ends, such as audiovisual products with highly emotive and engaging components versus a journalistic approach to the truth about what happened. Methodology/approach: The analysis is based on the specific theory of true crime developed by Punnett, who provides genuine narrative codes (Justice, Subversive, Geographic, Forensic, Vocative, and Folkloric) for true crime to distinguish it from the formal conventions and social objectives of journalistic documentaries. The case study (El crimen de Alcàsser) was selected because of its potential to drive a detailed and in-depth study on one of the most traumatic crimes in the country’s recent history: the kidnapping, rape, torture, and killing of three teenagers in 1992. Findings: Several scholars have identified journalistic elements in true crime productions in the digital context, adopted in an attempt to distance them from the true crime tradition of appealing to primitive instincts. Although it has been perceived also as a renewed formula for journalism to reach a wide audience and mainstream success, it banishes journalism from its origin and goals: to guarantee the citizenship’s right to be truly informed about crime. In this way, journalistic documentaries inspired by real crimes may play a crucial role in a democratic society, while true crime only exploits the empathy of viewers and places them in the active participation of determining the suspect-protagonist’s guilt as a mode of “clickable” entertainment in the digital culture. Research limitations: This is the first in a series of studies within a broader research project on true crime documentaries released on the VOD platforms in Spain. The findings are, in this case, preliminary. The analysis needs additional testing before its utility can be reasonably determined and a theory about true crime made in Spain could be developed. Originality: First, there is no specific research in the field of true crime in Spain, although crime stories already enjoyed a prominent place in Spain’s conventional TV programming. Second, the Punnett analysis model introduces an interesting way to complement existing theoretical references about the connections between true crime and journalism.

Details

Mass Mediated Representations of Crime and Criminality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-759-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2005

Tony Hernandez and Ken Jones

To detail the changing nature of retail and service activity in Canada's downtowns and examine the role of business improvement areas (BIAs) in promoting downtown vitality.

Abstract

Purpose

To detail the changing nature of retail and service activity in Canada's downtowns and examine the role of business improvement areas (BIAs) in promoting downtown vitality.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a combination of retail structural analysis and case study research. The structural analysis provides data on transitioning urban demographics and tracks retail and service activity sales change in Canada's major metropolitan downtowns. The case study reports an overview of findings from in‐depth research with the Downtown Yonge BIA. A small number of retail metrics are presented.

Findings

The paper highlights the significant suburb shift in retail activity across Canada's metropolitan areas and the associated challenges that this has resulted in for the downtown. The role of BIAs are outlined, and examined with reference to operation of the BIA concept within the downtown core of Canada's largest metropolitan market, Toronto.

Research limitations/implications

The research has been selective in focusing on the Downtown Yonge BIA, the experiences of BIAs across Toronto (and other Canada metropolitan areas) are likely to vary widely. Highlights the need to develop metrics to measure performance and compare BIAs.

Practical implications

The paper provides an interesting perspective on BIA strategies, with the selected metrics providing BIA managers and urban planners with a set of additional measures to assess BIA performance

Originality/value

The paper relates BIA planning to the development of performance metrics.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Executive summary
Publication date: 31 March 2021

HONDURAS: Drug case to hit ruling party election hopes

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES260579

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

John Byrom, Tony Hernández, David Bennison and Paul Hooper

Considers the potential that retail loyalty card schemes offer for a more informed understanding of consumer behaviour. With the widespread introduction of loyalty card…

Abstract

Considers the potential that retail loyalty card schemes offer for a more informed understanding of consumer behaviour. With the widespread introduction of loyalty card schemes across the UK, Europe and North America, retailers now have the opportunity to link detailed shopping pattern information to the individual consumer. Data gathered from loyalty card transactions can be referenced to the address of the individual, and as such, can be considered to be a particular type of potential geographic information. Based on detailed semi‐structured interviews within five UK retail organisations that have implemented loyalty card schemes, the article shows the nature of data analysis and applications at present, with data being mostly utilised in direct marketing. It is argued that recognition of the geographic nature of loyalty card data is currently lacking amongst scheme operators, yet is vital if higher order functions are to be realised. To that end, the paper presents visual frameworks that position loyalty card data within the organisational hierarchy and highlight potential techniques and applications that can be achieved via loyalty card data analysis.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

Emily Anderson, Chuck Chakrapani and Tony Hernandez

The purpose of this paper is to identify, using a case study, whether consumers in a metropolitan area can be meaningfully segmented geographically such that it can…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify, using a case study, whether consumers in a metropolitan area can be meaningfully segmented geographically such that it can understand the way they perceive and interact with the downtown district and to delineate the implications of the findings for business improvement area marketing initiatives from a management perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 650 visitors to downtown Toronto are interviewed using a pretested questionnaire. Their responses are related to their location within the metropolitan area. Correspondence analysis (CA) is applied to the data to visually identify possible market segments.

Findings

The analysis identified four distinct place‐based visitor segments. Each of these segments exhibited behaviour patterns that are distinct and intrinsically meaningful. The analysis further shows that perceptions and current interactions with the district are likely to change depending on where in the metropolis its consumers live.

Practical implications

Since visitor perceptions are place dependent, it is difficult to implement a single place marketing campaign that is relevant to each segment. The results suggest that it needs to develop communication strategies that are specific to each segment, incorporating an understanding of why they visit downtown, what they think of the area, what media they consume, how they get around and what their needs are in terms of lifestage.

Originality/value

By going beyond the traditional analysis of geographic variables and incorporating consumer response variables in the analysis, this paper provides a stronger basis for market segmentation and management action with regard to place marketing. The application of CA provides a visual way to understand the segments.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Norm O'Reilly, Ida E. Berger, Tony Hernandez, Milena M. Parent and Benoit Seguin

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the potential role and use of online social media to influence sport participation in youth aged 12 to 17 years by responding to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the potential role and use of online social media to influence sport participation in youth aged 12 to 17 years by responding to two specific research questions: what is the nature of the online “marketplace” among youth?; and what is the nature of adolescent sport behavior as revealed through activities on online social media?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines and then implements the research methodology of netnography to achieve its purpose. Netnography involves a researcher joining an online forum, e‐tribe or other open‐source social media to observe and record the discussions for analysis.

Findings

The overarching finding is that online discourse related to sport participation among youth is very limited. When discussion does take place, five themes emerge: benefits, advice‐seeking, finding common interests, learning new sports, and challenges.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides impetus for future work in the content area and in the use of the netnography method. It is limited by the lack of online content on the topic area by the target group.

Practical implications

The paper's results provide important understanding, direction and guidance to sport administrators working for government, sport organizations and organizations who market their products and services to youth through sport.

Originality/value

This paper is original in two respects: the use of netnography as the research method in this context, and the focus on social media and sport participation in youth.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

John Byrom

Abstract

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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