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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2019

Hiroshi Asaoka, Tomoya Takahashi, Jiafei Chen, Aya Fujiwara, Masataka Watanabe and Fumiyuki Noro

The purpose of this paper is to investigate why children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) tend to respond to tasks from their own perspective. The authors investigated the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate why children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) tend to respond to tasks from their own perspective. The authors investigated the effects of explicitness of viewpoint on performance of spontaneous level 2 perspective-taking skills in six- to eight-year-old children with ASD.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted visual perspective-taking tasks with explicit and implicit instructions about the viewpoint to be used. Participants operated a toy car on a map while listening to the experimenter’s instructions. In the implicit condition, when the experimenter said “Turn right/left” at each intersection, the participants moved the car accordingly. Subsequently, in the explicit condition, the experimenter said “Look from the driver’s viewpoint and turn right/left” at each intersection.

Findings

In the implicit condition, the authors did not observe a clear developmental change in performance between six- and eight-year-old children in the ASD group. In contrast, performance in the ASD group improved under the explicit condition relative to that under the implicit condition.

Originality/value

The results suggest six- to eight-year-old children with ASD tend not to spontaneously use level 2 perspective-taking skills. Therefore, viewpoints should be explicitly instructed to children with ASD. In addition, it is also important to implement training to encourage spontaneous transitions from self-perspective to other-perspective under the implicit condition.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2022

Tomoya Shiraishi, Kazuhiko Saito, Alexander Kuga and Yoshimi Yamahira

This study examined the factors that facilitated and obstructed the dissemination of a physical education lesson study (PELS) project in Peru, conducted in collaboration with…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined the factors that facilitated and obstructed the dissemination of a physical education lesson study (PELS) project in Peru, conducted in collaboration with Japan.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a qualitative approach, five Peruvian stakeholders in the field of physical education (PE) were interviewed. All the interviews were transcribed. The data were analysed using the Steps for Coding and Theorization (SCAT).

Findings

The factors that obstructed the dissemination of PELS were lack of mutual observation of lessons among teachers and the resistance of teachers to the project due to the term “study” in “lesson study”. Conversely, online dissemination of PELS may significantly improve its position in Peru. Disseminating PELS through small group practice and deploying it in the field of education through stakeholder collaboration comprised facilitating factors.

Originality/value

This study could facilitate an understanding of Peruvian educational and PE culture and have ripple effects on the practice and dissemination of LS in other countries and subject areas.

Details

International Journal for Lesson & Learning Studies, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

Keywords

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