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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2019

Therese Hellman, Fredrik Molin, Tomas Eriksson and Magnus Svartengren

The purpose of this paper is to explore and describe the perspective of the management group regarding how they reasoned when deciding to engage in a model focussing on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and describe the perspective of the management group regarding how they reasoned when deciding to engage in a model focussing on systematic work environment management, and what motives that influenced their decision.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study with semi-structured interviews includes 18 representatives from the management groups in 18 Swedish municipalities. Data were analysed with a constant comparative method.

Findings

The participants described two aspects that were of importance when making the decision; establishing commitment before making the decision and establishing strategies to legitimise the decision. Furthermore, they expressed motives that were linked both to their individual expectations and wishes and to policies and facts in their organisations. The participants experienced the model as a valuable tool in their organisations to increase employee participation and to provide structured support to their first-line managers.

Practical implications

The managers’ motives were linked to individual expectations and external directives. These were often intertwined and influenced their decisions. When implementing this type of model, it is important to discuss decisions in a larger group to avoid building an organisational initiative on one person’s expectations. Furthermore, it is important to support the management’s work to establish commitment for the model in the municipal organisation.

Originality/value

This study adds to knowledge of the complexity of deciding and implementing models to support systematic work environment management in organisations.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 March 2021

Thomas Andersson, Nomie Eriksson and Tomas Müllern

The purpose of the paper is to describe and analyze differences in patients' quality perceptions of private and public primary care centers in Sweden.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to describe and analyze differences in patients' quality perceptions of private and public primary care centers in Sweden.

Design/methodology/approach

The article explores the differences in quality perceptions between patients of public and private primary care centers based on data from a large patient survey in Sweden. The survey covers seven dimensions, and in this paper the measure Overall impression was used for the comparison. With more than 80,000 valid responses, the survey covers all primary care centers in Sweden which allowed for a detailed analysis of differences in quality perceptions among patients from the different categories of owners.

Findings

The article contributes with a detailed description of different types of private owners: not-for-profit and for profit, as well as corporate groups and independent care centers. The results show a higher quality perception for independent centers compared to both public and corporate groups.

Research limitations/implications

The small number of not-for-profit centers (21 out of 1,117 centers) does not allow for clear conclusions for this group. The results, however, indicate an even higher patient quality perception for not-for-profit centers. The study focus on describing differences in quality perceptions between the owner categories. Future research can contribute with explanations to why independent care centers receive higher patient satisfaction.

Social implications

The results from the study have policy implications both in a Swedish as well as international perspective. The differentiation between different types of private owners made in this paper opens up for interesting discussions on privatization of healthcare and how it affects patient satisfaction.

Originality/value

The main contribution of the paper is the detailed comparison of different categories of private owners and the public owners.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Anders Vennström and Per Erik Eriksson

The purpose of this paper is to identify client‐perceived barriers to a change towards increased client influence on the end result of the construction process…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify client‐perceived barriers to a change towards increased client influence on the end result of the construction process. Additionally, the variables of size of clients' markets and the extent of external project management are investigated in order to see how they influence the perceptions concerning important barriers to change.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data were collected through a survey responded to by 87 Swedish construction clients.

Findings

Identified barriers are divided into three types: attitudinal, industrial and institutional. Attitudinal barriers (adversarial attitudes, lack of ethics and morality, focus on projects instead of processes and a short‐term focus) and industrial barriers (traditional organization of the construction process, conservative industry culture, industry structure and traditional production processes) are perceived to be important, whereas institutional barriers (standard contracts, laws and traditional procurement procedures) are not perceived to be critical. Each different type of barrier is tested against the use of internal or external project management and the sphere of activity of the client. Attitudinal barriers are perceived as being more critical by clients using external project management. “Nearness” in terms of the sphere of activity (e.g. how large is the client's market?) also has an effect on how clients perceive the barriers. Locally, active clients do not consider attitudinal barriers to be as influential on the end result of the construction process as nationally active clients.

Research limitations/implications

Since the empirical results are based on data collected only from Swedish clients, international generalizations should be made with caution.

Practical implications

Clients wishing to act as change agents need to be aware that their use of internal versus external project management affects their chances to influence the other construction actors and implement change and innovation. Large national and international client organizations, which due to their size have significant opportunities to influence the industry, rely heavily on external project management, which may hamper their change agent role. Hence, such clients should make careful and purposeful selections of project management companies. Another more influential alternative is to strengthen their organisation and rely less on external project management.

Originality/value

This paper presents a unique investigation of the connections between the use of internal/external project management and perceived barriers to change.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2014

Anne-Maria Holma

This study provides a comprehensive framework of adaptation in triadic business relationship settings in the service sector. The framework is based on the industrial…

Abstract

This study provides a comprehensive framework of adaptation in triadic business relationship settings in the service sector. The framework is based on the industrial network approach (see, e.g., Axelsson & Easton, 1992; Håkansson & Snehota, 1995a). The study describes how adaptations initiate, how they progress, and what the outcomes of these adaptations are. Furthermore, the framework takes into account how adaptations spread in triadic relationship settings. The empirical context is corporate travel management, which is a chain of activities where an industrial enterprise, and its preferred travel agency and service supplier partners combine their resources. The scientific philosophy, on which the knowledge creation is based, is realist ontology. Epistemologically, the study relies on constructionist processes and interpretation. Case studies with in-depth interviews are the main source of data.

Details

Deep Knowledge of B2B Relationships within and Across Borders
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-858-7

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2019

Rocio Rodriguez, Göran Svensson, Nils M. Høgevold and David Eriksson

The purpose of this paper is to compare the similarities and differences relating to sustainability initiatives between health-care organizations. The aim is to provide a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the similarities and differences relating to sustainability initiatives between health-care organizations. The aim is to provide a framework of factors and their determinants to enable a profiling of organizational sustainability initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an inductive approach, judgmental sampling was applied to select relevant health-care organizations. Informants were identified according to their knowledge of their organizations’ sustainability initiatives.

Findings

Several factors and their determinants for characterizing differences and similarities were found. The results also reveal that organizational sustainability initiatives are either value-driven or business-driven.

Research limitations/implications

The reported framework of factors and their determinants serves the purpose of profiling organizational sustainability initiatives. Opportunities for further research are provided.

Practical implications

This paper provides managerial guidance for characterizing the differences and similarities with respect to organizational sustainability initiatives in relation to other organizations.

Originality/value

This study establishes a framework for characterizing organizational sustainability initiatives. It also contributes to reveal whether organizational sustainability initiatives are value – or business-driven and considers intrinsic-oriented differences and extrinsic-oriented similarities.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 September 2006

G. Tomas M. Hult, David J. Ketchen, Anna Shaojie Cui, Andrea M. Prud’homme, Steven H. Seggie, Michael A. Stanko, Alex Shichun Xu and S. Tamer Cavusgil

Structural equation modeling (SEM) is a powerful multivariate statistical technique that requires careful application. The use of SEM in international business research…

Abstract

Structural equation modeling (SEM) is a powerful multivariate statistical technique that requires careful application. The use of SEM in international business research has substantially increased recently, necessitating a critical evaluation of its use in the field. Through an analysis of 148 articles in the international business (IB) literature, we detail the state of current use of SEM in IB research and compare its use to the established best practices. In many instances, SEM's use in IB has been faulty, suggesting that authors may have drawn incorrect conclusions. To expand the IB field's knowledge base, methodological accuracy is essential. Based on our review of the technique's use in IB research coupled with the established practices in the social science literature, we provide practical suggestions for better applying SEM in the IB literature.

Details

Research Methodology in Strategy and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-339-6

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Mohammed Arif, Deepthi Bendi, Tahsin Toma‐Sabbagh and Monty Sutrisna

The growth of Indian economy has brought with it significant increase in construction activities. These increased construction activities have further highlighted the…

Abstract

Purpose

The growth of Indian economy has brought with it significant increase in construction activities. These increased construction activities have further highlighted the problem of waste generation on construction sites. The purpose of this paper is to provide important insights and highlight some issues related to the implementation of effective waste management practices on construction sites in India.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents two cases and results from semi‐structured interviews which shed light on some of the major issues, challenges and drivers associated with the implementation of waste management in construction in India.

Findings

One of the key findings was that client preference and enforcement of existing laws could actually facilitate the implementation of waste minimisation effectively. Some of the practices being followed, and which are gaining more popularity, are waste quantification, waste segregation, and the implementation of 3Rs (reduce, recycle, and reuse). Congested construction sites, sites in heavily built‐up areas with no ability to have an alternate storage or staging location for materials, lack of ownership of waste due to the presence of multiple contractors on the construction site and lack of awareness and education among the construction workforce were regarded as major challenges associated with the implementation of waste minimisation practices in India.

Research limitations/implications

The cases and the interviewees chosen were through the authors' links with the Indian Green Building Council (IGBC). The cases were LEED registered projects therefore issues dealing with green construction had been taken into account. These cases might not be representative of the entire country, as there are significantly high proportions of construction projects that are not as green, especially in smaller cities in India. However, the two cases do provide important insights and highlight some issues related to the implementation of effective waste management practices on construction sites in India. The individuals interviewed also had link with IGBC. They had been involved with the green building movement in India for a significant length of time. But the length and breadth of their experience gave them the ability to comment on state of the construction sector and its green as well as non‐green practices associated with waste management.

Originality/value

This paper presents an exploratory study which assesses the implementation of waste management practices in the Indian construction industry. It also highlights activities within different stages of a construction project that can lead to more effective waste management in the construction sector.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Norman Rudhumbu and E.C. (Elize) Du Plessis

The study investigated factors influencing how the curriculum is implemented in accredited private higher education institutions (PHEIs) in Botswana.

Abstract

Purpose

The study investigated factors influencing how the curriculum is implemented in accredited private higher education institutions (PHEIs) in Botswana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigated factors influencing curriculum implementation in accredited private universities (PUs) operating in a highly regulated higher education environment in Botswana. A total of six PUs which have been operating in Botswana for at least five years were purposively selected for the study. The mixed methods approach was used in the study. From the six PUs, a sample of 306 lecturers was selected from a population of 1,500 lecturers using stratified random sampling strategy for the quantitative phase of the study, and 25 academic middle managers (AMMs) were also selected from a population of 273 academic middle managers using purposive sampling strategy for the qualitative phase. A structured questionnaire and a semi-structured interview guide were used for data collection. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to test the reliability and validity of the measurements. Descriptive statistics, chi-square, one-way ANOVA and regression analysis were used for quantitative data analysis, while a meta-aggregative approach was used for analysing qualitative data. Results showed that educational level, characteristics of the curriculum, of the institution and of the external environment had a significant influence on how curriculum is implemented in PUs in Botswana, while gender, age and years of teaching experience did not have a significant influence. These results have implications on educational policy formulation by regulatory authorities as well as practice in universities for the purpose of enhancing curriculum implementation.

Findings

Results showed that educational level, characteristics of the curriculum, of the institution and of the external environment had a significant influence on how the curriculum is implemented in PUs in Botswana, while gender, age and years of teaching experience did not have a significant influence.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from lecturers in accredited private higher education institutions in Botswana only which limited the scope of insight into challenges facing accredited private institutions. Future research needs to expand the scope and consider private both private and public higher education institutions in Botswana and beyond so that more insight on the factors affecting curriculum implementation in higher education institutions can be established and appropriate policies and processes could be put in place for effective curriculum implementation.

Practical implications

The study provides insight into challenges affecting curriculum implementation in higher education institutions and how regulatory authorities, institutional authorities and lecturers can contribute to effective curriculum implementation in these institutions.

Social implications

The study offers an opportunity for higher education institutions to implement the curriculum in a manner that satisfies its primary customers who are the students by taking cognizance of and satisfying factors that contribute to effective curriculum implementation.

Originality/value

There is no study known to the researcher that has been conducted on factors affecting curriculum implementation in accredited private universities in Botswana. This study, therefore, is an eye-opener on such factors and what actions regulatory authorities, institutional management and lecturers should take to promote effective implementation of the curriculum in higher education institutions in Botswana.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2019

Magnus Hansson, Hanna Gottfridsson and Sandra Raanaes

This paper aims to analyse the construction of gender in business media through identification of media discourses in terms of vocabulary and vocabulary structures.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the construction of gender in business media through identification of media discourses in terms of vocabulary and vocabulary structures.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct critical discourse analysis and linguistic text analysis of media articles in two Swedish business magazines, focussing on vocabulary and vocabulary structures used to describe men and women as managers.

Findings

Media texts fall into traditional, gender-stereotyped patterns. The use of metaphors, choice of words and sentence structures construct and maintain stereotyped models of gender. The linguistic practices and use of specific and gender-biased vocabulary shape discursive practices, contributing to the construction and reconstruction of institutionalised gender-stereotyped patterns of behaviour and established social norms.

Research limitations/implications

The focus on vocabulary and vocabulary structures extends the technique and application of critical discourse analysis, enabling fine-grained analyses, in this case of media texts. This research also indicates a need for future studies that adopt a critical discourse analysis to take into account analytical procedures that shed light on micro-mechanisms that support the materialisations of gender inequalities.

Social implications

Texts that portray both men and women show gender bias that is deeply rooted in the vocabulary and vocabulary structures and thus help to reinforce established discursive practices and gender inequalities. Therefore, there is a need for a fundamental change in the media reports on managers.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the analysis of media texts and representations of men and women as managers by providing a detailed analysis of discursive practices that takes into account vocabulary and vocabulary structures. The findings show the deeply rooted structure of gender-stereotyped patterns in media texts.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2017

Abstract

Details

Knowledge Transfer to and within Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-405-7

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