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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Tomas Bonavia and Juan A. Marin‐Garcia

The first goal of this research is to analyse the effects of lean production (LP) on the policy of human resource management (HRM). The second is to determine whether or…

Abstract

Purpose

The first goal of this research is to analyse the effects of lean production (LP) on the policy of human resource management (HRM). The second is to determine whether or not implementation of HRM practices associated with LP explains the differences in organizational performance between manufacturing plants.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper developed a questionnaire for data collection. Findings are presented from 76 establishments (79.17 per cent of the total sample) that specialise in single‐firing ceramic tiles in Spain.

Findings

Companies that make the most of LP practices are also those that take care to train workers in using these practices as well as improving their employment security. However, the same is not true for the pay for performance system. The combination of LP with HRM practices reduces inventory and boosts productivity but does not appear to affect the other performance variables analysed.

Research limitations/implications

For certain variables very little variation was found between the plants in the samples. The data are cross‐sectional, so causality cannot be definitively determined.

Practical implications

This paper indicates the HRM practices associated with the LP and the results obtained. It can thus be used to help human resource and production departments in improving organizational performance.

Originality/value

The paper extends the work of other researchers by focusing on a sector and a country that have been very little studied to date. The sample consists of a set of plants that are fairly homogeneous, which facilitates the analysis of the relationships between the selected variables, while keeping other variables controlled.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Juan A. Marin‐Garcia, Manuela Pardo del Val and Tomás Bonavía Martín

The purpose of this paper is to show a real experience of how a scheme of continuous improvement has been gradually transformed, from a very unsuccessful start, passing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show a real experience of how a scheme of continuous improvement has been gradually transformed, from a very unsuccessful start, passing through different phases and finally delivering results for the firm.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyse the evolution of the formal programs of continuous improvement of a firm in a traditional sector (food). The data for the research were gathered by means of participatory observation over the course of 18 months spent in the firm attending the meetings of the improvement teams.

Findings

Both programs (individual and group) have proved to be very profitable for the company. However, there is no magic formula for the correct operation of the system of continuous improvement. The existing system has to be continually improved, correcting faults and trying always to contribute something new to re‐launch the system regularly.

Practical implications

This study has also permitted the authors to highlight the importance of continuous improvement in the firm from both the economic point of view and that of worker development.

Originality/value

The investigation aims to help to cover the lack of longitudinal case studies of continuous improvement.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Juan A. Marín García, Manuela Pardo del Val and Tomás Bonavia Martin

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effect of training on ad hoc teams in an industrial setting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effect of training on ad hoc teams in an industrial setting.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, data were collected from 11 Spanish automobile manufacturer suppliers and included the assessment of the current situation, the creation and holding of different workshops followed by the collection of the results.

Findings

The paper finds that ad hoc teams are really effective especially in lean companies.

Originality/value

This paper breaks new ground in analysing the effect of training ad hoc teams in an industrial setting.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Tomas Bonavia and Juan Antonio Marin

To determine the degree of use of some of the most representative lean production (LP) practices in the Spanish ceramic tile industry, their relationship with plant size…

Abstract

Purpose

To determine the degree of use of some of the most representative lean production (LP) practices in the Spanish ceramic tile industry, their relationship with plant size and their effect on the operational performance of the companies in the sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was developed for data collection. Findings are presented from 76 companies (79.17 per cent of the total sample) that specialise in single firing ceramics.

Findings

In the sector under study, there is one set of practices that have as yet scarcely been implemented (group technology, kanban, reduction of set‐up time, development of multi‐function employees and visual factory) and another set whose use is fairly widespread (standardisation of operations, total productive maintenance and quality controls). The degree of their respective use depends on a firm's size. Very few correlations appear between the degree of use of any specific LP practice in isolation and the operational indicators.

Research limitations/implications

For certain variables we found very little variation between the firms in our sample. Moreover, many firms did not have available the data needed for calculating capacity utilisation, and hence we have not been able to check its effects in our analysis.

Practical implications

The paper presents data for reflecting on the application of different LP practices in isolation and on the impediments limiting the use of some of them in the sector.

Originality/value

The paper extends the work of other researchers by focusing on a sector and a country that have been very little studied until now. The sample consists of a set of firms that are fairly homogeneous; this facilitates analysing the relationships between the selected variables while keeping other variables controlled.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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