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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Andrew Forrester, Chiara Samele, Karen Slade, Tom Craig and Lucia Valmaggia

The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of suicide ideation amongst a group of people who had been arrested and taken into police custody, and were then…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of suicide ideation amongst a group of people who had been arrested and taken into police custody, and were then referred to a mental health service operating in the police stations.

Design/methodology/approach

A referred sample of 888 cases were collected over an 18-month period during 2012/2013. Clinical assessments were conducted using a template in which background information was collected (including information about their previous clinical history, substance misuse, alleged offence, any pre-identified diagnoses, and the response of the service) as part of the standard operating procedure of the service. Data were analysed using a statistical software package.

Findings

In total, 16.2 per cent (n=144) reported suicide ideation, with women being more likely to report than men. In total, 82.6 per cent of the suicide ideation sample reported a history of self-harm or a suicide attempt. Suicide ideation was also associated with certain diagnostic categories (depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and personality disorder), a history of contact with mental health services, and recent (within 24 hours) consumption of alcohol or drugs.

Originality/value

This evaluation adds to the limited literature in this area by describing a large sample from a real clinical service. It provides information that can assist with future service designs and it offers support for calls for a standardised health screening process, better safety arrangements for those who have recently used alcohol or drugs (within 24 hours) and integrated service delivery across healthcare domains (i.e. physical healthcare, substance use, and mental health).

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Rebecca Chester, Eddie Chaplin, Elias Tsakanikos, Jane McCarthy, Nick Bouras and Tom Craig

This study aimed to examine for differences on how symptoms relating to depression and anxiety were reported by males and females with intellectual disability as part of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to examine for differences on how symptoms relating to depression and anxiety were reported by males and females with intellectual disability as part of the development of the Self‐Assessment Intervention Package (SAINT), a guided self‐help tool.

Design/methodology/approach

Three self‐report questionnaires were administered (The Glasgow Depression Scale – Learning Disabilities (GDS‐LD)), Glasgow Anxiety Scale – Intellectual Disabilities (GAS‐ID) and Self‐Assessment Intervention Package (SAINT) to a group of people with mild intellectual disabilities (n=36), to allow comparison of symptom reporting between genders, in particular examining the SAINT across the two groups.

Findings

Statistically significant differences in self‐reported symptoms as assessed with SAINT were found between males and females. The symptoms where related mainly to mood and self‐esteem. Overall, endorsement of self‐reported depressive symptoms was between 2.7‐3.2 times higher in female than male patients.

Originality/value

There was evidence to suggest differences in self‐report and symptom profiles of depression and anxiety of males and females with mild intellectual disabilities with females reporting higher in terms of symptoms using the SAINT. The SAINT is a valid tool for screening and self‐reporting symptoms of anxiety and depression in people with intellectual disabilities.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Colin Hemmings, Shaymaa Obousy and Tom Craig

The use of accessible, portable, mental health crisis information in people with intellectual disabilities has not been previously reported. The purpose of this paper is…

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Abstract

Purpose

The use of accessible, portable, mental health crisis information in people with intellectual disabilities has not been previously reported. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether crisis information could be modified to be made accessible and meaningful for people with intellectual disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Personalized information to help in a mental health crisis was recorded on folded A4 sized sheets that could be carried in a conveniently sized wallet.

Findings

Three quarters of the participants carried their crisis information wallets on a daily basis for six months before evaluation. They and their carers expressed positive feedback about them carrying the crisis information. No one carrying the information actually experienced a mental health crisis in the six months follow up period so their usefulness in such crises could not be evaluated. However, they were unexpectedly used in other non‐mental health settings and reported to have been helpful.

Originality/value

The sample size in this was small but the findings suggested that the carrying of crisis information might be a helpful measure for some people with intellectual disabilities. A further, larger scale trial is warranted.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2012

Eddie Chaplin, Tom Craig and Nick Bouras

In spite of the greater prevalence of mental ill‐health in people with intellectual disabilities, there has been little work specifically aimed at how this group recognise…

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277

Abstract

Purpose

In spite of the greater prevalence of mental ill‐health in people with intellectual disabilities, there has been little work specifically aimed at how this group recognise threats to their mental health and the strategies used to minimise them. This study aims to look at the first stage of development of a guided self‐help (GSH) pack called the Self Assessment and INTervention pack (SAINT).

Design/methodology/approach

Delphi methods and focus groups were employed to gather opinions from two expert groups: professionals or clinical experts (ranged N=15‐33); and service users (n=9), to inform the contents of the SAINT. The Delphi was conducted by e‐mail. Results from each round were shared between the two groups to develop a consensus.

Findings

Retention rates for clinical experts were 45.45 per cent, during the Delphi and 100 per cent for the service user experts in the focus groups. Both groups were able to reach a consensus of the items that would make up the SAINT. Delphi methods combined with focus groups were able generate the contents of the SAINT and demonstrated versatility in this dual approach by being able to gain a consensus from both groups.

Research limitations/implications

There is no consensus as to how many people are ideal for a Delphi. Although the final number in round 3 was low, it can be argued that those remaining had most interest in the subject.

Practical implications

The aim is to produce and pilot the SAINT, a GSH package for people with intellectual disabilities, following reliability and validity testing.

Social implications

Currently GSH is widely used for mild depression in Primary Care and other disorders such as mild anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, and other related conditions. However, there are no specific GSH packages for people with intellectual disabilities. Currently the GSH tools that are available are not designed for people with cognitive impairments and do not reflect the lifestyles of many people with intellectual disabilities.

Originality/value

This paper should be of value to anyone with an interest in supporting people with intellectual disabilities to recognise and manage specific symptoms or feelings that threaten the person's mental well being.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2009

Dolly Sen, Sarah Morgan and Jerome Carson

The development of the recovery approach must mean a fundamental change in how mental health services see service users, for as the Social Perspectives Network paper…

Abstract

The development of the recovery approach must mean a fundamental change in how mental health services see service users, for as the Social Perspectives Network paper rhetorically asks, ‘Whose Recovery is it?’, it is, of course, the service users' (Social Perspectives Network, 2007). The recent influential Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health report, suggests that professionals need to move from a position of ‘being on top, to being on tap’ (Shepherd et al, 2008). Service users need to take a more central role in the whole recovery debate. One of the ways that this aim can be realised is by looking at ‘recovery heroes’. These are individuals whose journey of recovery can inspire both other service users and professionals alike.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

K. Minten and J. Messer

Over the past 20 years there has been a recurrent problem of a purple‐bluish stain appearing on the laminate materials of finished printed circuit boards between the…

Abstract

Over the past 20 years there has been a recurrent problem of a purple‐bluish stain appearing on the laminate materials of finished printed circuit boards between the gold‐plated fingers. The origin of this staining has been traced back to the PWB fabrication plant and it is generally accepted to be related to either the gold plating bath and/or the solder stripper chemistry. In this paper the authors report their investigation of this phenomenon and show that, far from being a benign, cosmetic defect, this purple stain poses a potentially serious metallic contamination to the laminate surface of the PWB. The purple colour arises from generation of a colloidal gold chromophore known as the ‘Purple of Cassius,’ which has been known since ancient times and has been in commercial use in the glass and ceramics industry for at least 300 years.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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Book part
Publication date: 26 March 2020

Llewella Chapman

On 2 September 2015, it was announced that Tom Ford would again be ‘dressing James Bond’, Daniel Craig, in Spectre (Mendes, 2015) after tailoring his suits for Quantum of

Abstract

On 2 September 2015, it was announced that Tom Ford would again be ‘dressing James Bond’, Daniel Craig, in Spectre (Mendes, 2015) after tailoring his suits for Quantum of Solace (Forster, 2008) and Skyfall (Mendes, 2012). Ford noted that ‘James Bond epitomises the Tom Ford man in his elegance, style and love of luxury. It is an honour to move forward with this iconic character’.

  With the press launch of ‘Bond 25’(and now titled No Time to Die) on 25 April 2019, it is reasonable to speculate that Ford will once again be employed as James Bond’s tailor of choice, given that it is likely to be Craig’s last outing as 007. Previous actors playing the role of James Bond have all had different tailors. Sean Connery was tailored by Anthony Sinclair and George Lazenby by Dimitro ‘Dimi’ Major. Roger Moore recommended his own personal tailors Cyril Castle, Angelo Vitucci and Douglas Hayward. For Timothy Dalton, Stefano Ricci provided the suits, and Pierce Brosnan was dressed by Brioni. Therefore, this chapter will analyse the role of tailoring within the James Bond films, and how this in turn contributes to the look and character of this film franchise more generally. It aims to understand how different tailors have contributed to the masculinity of Bond: an agent dressed to thrill as well as to kill.

Details

From Blofeld to Moneypenny: Gender in James Bond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-163-1

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Book part
Publication date: 24 June 2013

Maria Assunção Flores

This chapter draws on a larger study on beginning teachers and on their experiences of becoming a teacher in unprecedented challenging circumstances in Portugal. The aim…

Abstract

This chapter draws on a larger study on beginning teachers and on their experiences of becoming a teacher in unprecedented challenging circumstances in Portugal. The aim is to look at the ways in which changes in policy and school context, as well as in personal and professional context, impact teachers’ professional identity over time. Two beginning teachers’ accounts are used to illustrate the key influencing factors that have impacted the development of professional identities. Four main themes emerged: (a) the influence of context, both at a policy and social level and at a school level; (b) the importance of relationships in teaching, particularly with students and colleagues; (c) the emergence of inner tensions resulting from the mismatch between strong beliefs and reality; and (d) the role of emotions in (re)defining teachers’ practice of teaching and teachers’ identity development. The chapter concludes with the discussion of the findings and their implications.

Details

From Teacher Thinking to Teachers and Teaching: The Evolution of a Research Community
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-851-8

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Book part
Publication date: 12 April 2021

Jing Li, Cheryl J. Craig, Tenesha Gale, Michele Norton, Gang Zhu, Paige K. Evans, Donna W. Stokes and Rakesh Verma

This chapter narratively examines the value of scholarship grants to seven underrepresented science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students who attended…

Abstract

This chapter narratively examines the value of scholarship grants to seven underrepresented science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students who attended the same research comprehensive university. The scholarships that the students in our convenience sample received were awarded by six National Science Foundation grant programs in the United States. A literature review tracing the effects of scholarships, instrumentalism, and the core purpose of education sets the context for this narrative investigation. The four pillars comprising the theoretical framework are value, experience, story, and identity. The seven stories of impact that emerged from the narrative inquiry reveal multiperspectival insights into the value of scholarships to students' lives, careers, and selves. Moreover, we also explore how scholarship recipients established their sense of value in autonomous and committed ways while promoting their personal welfare and seeking the common good of others. All of these important considerations contribute to the national and international literature relating to diversity, higher education, STEM careers, and the power of scholarship grants to transcend instrumentalism privileging workforce demands.

Details

Preparing Teachers to Teach the STEM Disciplines in America’s Urban Schools
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-457-6

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Book part
Publication date: 12 April 2021

Jing Li, Paige K. Evans, Cheryl J. Craig, Donna W. Stokes, Rakesh Verma and Gang Zhu

Scant attention has been paid to the influence of professors on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students' learning and lives at the tertiary…

Abstract

Scant attention has been paid to the influence of professors on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students' learning and lives at the tertiary level. To fill this void, this chapter examines the influence of professors on students' entering and remaining in the STEM disciplines and pursuing STEM careers within the context of six funded STEM grants in the southern United States. We examine professor–student interactions using the students' storied experiences as the fodder for our narrative inquiry. We present narrative exemplars from which the following themes emerged: (1) agency as a student and agency as a human being, (2) development of students' multilayered identities, and (3) professors' engagement of themselves in their interactions with students. A discussion of learner-centeredness and professors' professional development in higher education concludes this study of professors' influence on students' learning and intended careers.

Details

Preparing Teachers to Teach the STEM Disciplines in America’s Urban Schools
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-457-6

Keywords

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