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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2019

Tom Baum, David Solnet, Richard Robinson and Shelagh K. Mooney

This is an invited 75article for Tourism Review addressing tourism employment, past and future.

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Abstract

Purpose

This is an invited 75article for Tourism Review addressing tourism employment, past and future.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual analysis of tourism employment with a focus on paradox.

Findings

Inherent paradox which underpins tourism employment.

Originality/value

A wholly original take on tourism employment.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 75 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Edmund Goh and Tom Baum

The COVID-19 pandemic has seen a growing emergence of “quarantine hotels” that provide accommodation to guests who are mandated to self-isolate for 14 days upon entry to a…

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Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic has seen a growing emergence of “quarantine hotels” that provide accommodation to guests who are mandated to self-isolate for 14 days upon entry to a country to prevent the spread of virus. Why are young hotel workers willing to endure relatively poor working conditions and expose themselves to dangerous COVID-19 workplace environments? Perhaps, the opportunity to participate in meaningful work is the prime motivator for hotel workers who choose to work in quarantine hotels. This study aims to investigate the motivations that young hotel employees hold towards working in a potentially dangerous hotel workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Using personal interviews, this research explored the antecedents behind Generation Z employees’ (n = 42) actual behaviour towards working in quarantine hotels through the lens of the extended theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model (attitudes, subjective norms, perceived difficulties and meaningful work).

Findings

Results revealed that meaningful work such as making the world safer and going beyond the call of duty was a key motivating factor behind a willingness to work in quarantine hotels. Hotel employees also viewed working in quarantine hotels as exciting but dangerous, and the support from their family nuclei was seen as a key underlying motivator.

Practical implications

The key implications are the image of the hospitality industry in terms of professional identity to be an industry that is respected by society given the high-risk work environment with increased exposure to COVID-19. Even though Generation Z still see some long-standing negatives in hotel work such as long hours and emotional challenge, it is positive to know that there are contexts in which they can have more pride and meaningfulness from their jobs.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper to examine Generation Z hotel workers’ motivations to work in quarantine hotels. A key theoretical contribution to the body of knowledge is the extension of the TPB framework with the additional meaningful work variable.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Helen Francis and Tom Baum

This study aims to identify recent trends in the strategic repositioning of the human resources (HR) function within the hotel industry, and to explore challenges facing…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify recent trends in the strategic repositioning of the human resources (HR) function within the hotel industry, and to explore challenges facing HR professionals as they engage in strategies to develop talent and organisational capability, while adjusting to the shifting boundaries of the HR function.

Design/methodology/approach

The study provides a case study investigation based on a qualitative research design. It draws on a series of informal discussions with key informants, in-depth round table discussions with members of the HR function and a rich source of secondary (company specific) data about a recent strategic change initiative.

Findings

The study presents a rich picture of the contradictory nature of the strategic repositioning of the HR function, and the role of electronic HR systems in shaping this. It points to the significance of “higher-order” HR capabilities associated with the functions’ capacity to engage in strategies to develop talent and organisational capability.

Practical implications

This study points to contradictions and tensions in shifting the focus of the HR function from “operational” to “strategic” management of talent. It offers four practice implications in the areas of continuous professional development, and building HR and line manager skills in dialogue, project management and the use of new technology, talent data and analytics.

Originality/value

This study illustrates the deployment of talent management practices within a broader organisational development remit to restructure the business and HR function in pursuit of more efficient and effective people management.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Yue Yuan, Haiyan Kong, Tom Baum, Yining Liu, Chao Liu, Naipeng Bu, Kangping Wang and Zihan Yin

This paper aims to explore the effects of leadership style and trust in leadership on employees’ affective commitment under the epidemic situation.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the effects of leadership style and trust in leadership on employees’ affective commitment under the epidemic situation.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 580 valid questionnaires were collected online targeting the hospitality and tourism employees working from home during the particular period of the COVID-19 Coronavirus crisis. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data with AMOS software.

Findings

The findings indicated that perceived transformational leadership was a positive predictor of trust in leadership and affective commitment. In addition to the positive contribution to commitment, trust in leadership also mediated the relationship between transformational leadership and organizational commitment.

Originality/value

The current study contributes to the literature on leadership and organizational commitment. The results of this study may provide a valuable guide to organizations, leaders and young employees.

变革型领导对员工信任及员工情感承诺的影响研究

研究目标

本文旨在研究在新冠疫情背景下, 变革型领导对员工信任度以及情感承诺的影响。

研究设计

本文研究对象为旅游及酒店行业工作人员, 由于新冠疫情, 调查问卷通过线上的方式向居家办公的酒店工作人员进行发放, 调查结束共收集到580份有效问卷, 利用AMOS软件对收集到的数据进行结构方程分析。

研究发现

本研究发现, 变革型领导对员工组织信任具有正向影响, 员工信任对员工的组织情感承诺具有正向影响, 变革型领导正向影响员工的组织情感承诺, 并且, 变革型领导通过增强员工信任度, 正向影响员工的组织情感承诺, 即员工信任在变革型领导和情感承诺中间起中介作用。

研究意义

本研究为拓展企业管理领域研究做出了贡献, 本文研究结果验证了相关的领导理论及组织管理理论, 丰富了职业承诺领域的研究, 为组织、领导以及青年员工的职业发展提供了参考借鉴。

Investigación sobre la influencia del liderazgo transformacional en la confianza y el compromiso emocional de los empleados

Objetivos de la investigación

Este artículo tiene como objetivo estudiar la influencia del liderazgo transformacional en la confianza y el compromiso emocional de los empleados bajo el impacto del Covid-19.

Diseño de la investigación

El objeto de investigación de este artículo es el personal del sector turístico y hotelero. Se recogieron un total de 580 cuestionarios válidos y se analizaron los datos recopilados mediante ecuación estructural utilizando el software AMOS.

Hallazgos de la investigación

Esta investigación encontró que el liderazgo transformacional tiene una influencia positiva en la confianza de los empleados, la confianza de los empleados tiene una influencia positiva en el compromiso emocional de los empleados, el liderazgo transformacional afecta positivamente el compromiso emocional de los empleados y la confianza de los empleados juega un papel intermediario entre el liderazgo transformacional y el compromiso emocional.

Importancia de la investigación

Esta investigación enriquece la investigación sobre la teoría del liderazgo y el compromiso organizacional, y proporciona una referencia para el desarrollo profesional de organizaciones, líderes y empleados jóvenes.

Article
Publication date: 3 November 2022

Pearl M.C. Lin, Kang-Lin Peng, Wai Ching Wilson Au and Tom Baum

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused the food delivery sector to boom as people continue to rely on services provided by online catering platforms (OCPs). However, because of…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused the food delivery sector to boom as people continue to rely on services provided by online catering platforms (OCPs). However, because of the nature of sharing economy employment, gig workers’ contributions went largely ignored until intervention from institutional governance. This study aims to explore the impacts of labor market transformation after the Chinese Government issued guidance to promote gig workers’ welfare as a focal case.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus groups and the Delphi technique were used to explore associated impacts on OCPs and gig workers based on governance theory.

Findings

Results show that institutional governance negatively affected OCPs’ operating cost structure but sustained gig workers’ welfare. The dual effects of market mechanism and institutional governance in the sharing economy are needed to be balanced for labor market transformation.

Research limitations/implications

Long-term equilibrium can be fulfilled, given the growing food-related demand for the market mechanism. Social reciprocity is expected to be realized through institutional governance for gig workers’ welfare.

Originality/value

This study suggests that moving from market governance to stakeholder governance, as mediated by state governance, could transform gig workers’ labor structure in the gig economy. This study presents an integrated governance theory to enhance the epistemology of institutional governance.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 September 2022

Donagh Horgan and Tom Baum

This paper aims to focus on increasingly entrepreneurial approaches to urban governance in the country’s second city Cork, where neoliberal strategy has driven uneven…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on increasingly entrepreneurial approaches to urban governance in the country’s second city Cork, where neoliberal strategy has driven uneven spatial development.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper combines insights from literature review with new knowledge derived from interviews with key informants in the city.

Findings

Post-colonial themes provoke a consideration of how uneven power dynamics stifle social innovation in the built environment.

Research limitations/implications

Assembled narratives expose opaque aspects of governance, ownership and participation, presenting opportunities for rethinking urban vacancy through placemaking.

Practical implications

These draw on nuanced models for tourism as a platform for a broader discourse on rights to the city.

Social implications

A century after independence, Ireland is recast as a leading small European economy, away from historical framings of a rural economic backwater of the British Empire.

Originality/value

The model of success is based on a basket of targeted investment policies and somewhat dubious indicators for growth.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 July 2019

Tom Baum

This paper aims to confront the most challenging issues that the hospitality industry faces. This relates to the recruitment and retention of talented future leaders. This…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to confront the most challenging issues that the hospitality industry faces. This relates to the recruitment and retention of talented future leaders. This is a long-standing issue but one that is increasing in importance as industry changes, combined with external pressures within the labour market (demographic and competitive), act to restructure the recruitment landscape in many countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a literature-based analysis that addresses two key questions relating to the hospitality industry and talent – does the sector need talent and, controversially, does it deserve talent? The literature has been addressed on the basis of the author’s in-depth knowledge and the use of a wide range of pertinent search terms relating to the core themes of hospitality and talent management.

Findings

The paper assesses evidence with respect to both questions, framed as propositions, and concludes that the current talent pipelines, upon which hospitality substantially depends, may not be fit for purpose, and that the wider workplace culture within hospitality is not compatible with the attraction of the best into the industry.

Research limitations/implications

The paper challenges the established practice, both within the hospitality industry, in terms of its workplace environment, and in the way its educational partners (hospitality management schools) prepare young people for the industry. The outcomes of the analysis do not provide much by way of succour to either.

Practical implications

Implicit in this paper is a call to key stakeholders (industry and education) in the search for future leaders of the hospitality industry to address and review both the industry workplace, to make it more attractive and rewarding for young graduates, and the educational model that still dominates hospitality management programmes in preparing them for careers.

Social implications

Careers in hospitality will remain “Cinderella” options for young graduates until action is taken by stakeholders to reposition the nature of the careers on offer and the focus of the programmes available in preparation for them.

Originality/value

The approach taken is the presentation of widely recognised themes in an original format.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 July 2020

Tom Baum, Shelagh K.K. Mooney, Richard N.S. Robinson and David Solnet

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the immediate impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the hospitality workforce in situ between mid-April and June 2020.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the immediate impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the hospitality workforce in situ between mid-April and June 2020.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a viewpoint paper that brings together a variety of sources and intelligence relating the impacts on hospitality work of the COVID-19 pandemic at three levels: macro (global, policy, government), meso (organisational) and micro (employee). It questions whether the situations faced by hospitality workers as a result of the pandemic are seed-change different from the precarious lives they normally lead or just a (loud) amplification of the “normal”.

Findings

In light of the fluid environment relating to COVID-19, conclusions are tentative and question whether hospitality stakeholders, particularly consumers, governments and the industry itself, will emerge from the pandemic with changed attitudes to hospitality work and hospitality workers.

Practical implications

This raises questions about hospitality work for key stakeholders to address in the future, some of which are systemic in terms of how precarious labour forces, critical to the global economy are to be considered by policy makers, organisations in a re-emerging competitive market for talent and for those who chose (or not) to work in hospitality.

Social implications

This paper contributes to ongoing debates about precarious work and the extent to which such practices are institutionalised and adopts an “amplification model” that may have value in futures-orientated analysis about hospitality and tourism.

Originality/value

This paper is wholly original and a reflection on the COVID-19 crisis. It provides a point of wider reference with regard to responses to crises and their impact on employment in hospitality, highlighting how ongoing change, fluidity and uncertainty serve to magnify and exacerbate the precarious nature of work in the industry.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2022

Irma Booyens, Anastasios Hadjisolomou, Dennis Nickson, Tayler Cunningham and Tom Baum

This study aims to examine customer misbehaviour in the hospitality sector during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine customer misbehaviour in the hospitality sector during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws on a cross-sectional survey of employees in the Scottish hospitality sector highlighting customer misbehaviour as a key concern during the pandemic. Prevalent types of abuse and harassment experienced are outlined along with employee and management responses to incidents of misbehaviour.

Findings

Verbal abuse and sexual harassment from customers are the most prevalent types of misbehaviour either experienced or witnessed by respondents. Customer misbehaviour is commonly thought of as “part of the job” and therefore “not a big deal”. Managers, largely, expect workers to tolerate abusive behaviours from customers and do not take reports of incidents seriously.

Practical implications

Transformational managers need to foster workplace well-being with a focus on physical and psychological safety. Recognition of the issue and greater support for victims are furthermore required at an industry level and on the policy front.

Social implications

The research points to an uncomfortable reality in the service economy that needs to be confronted by society. It has, therefore, important implications for key stakeholders in ensuring fair, dignified and safe hospitality workplaces.

Originality/value

Customer misbehaviour is reportedly worsening in times of COVID-19 as demonstrated by this study. Despite rhetoric that abuse and harassment are not tolerated, dismissive attitudes from managers – who expect workers to tolerate abusive behaviour – and employee silence about incidents lead the authors to argue that the failure to acknowledge and address this issue constitutes a form of “social washing” in hospitality.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 34 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 May 2020

Tom Baum and Nguyen Thi Thanh Hai

The purpose of this paper is to undertake a “real-time” assessment of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the right to participate in hospitality and tourism and to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to undertake a “real-time” assessment of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the right to participate in hospitality and tourism and to illustrate where such rights are under threat.

Design/methodology/approach

This discussion is based on a review of current events, assessed through interpretation of a human rights lens.

Findings

Rights to participate in hospitality and tourism, particularly in parts of Asia, Europe and North America, were affected on a scale unprecedented in peacetime.

Research limitations/implications

The rights to participate in hospitality and tourism have been challenged as never before. The big questions that will need to be answered going forward are the extent to which such rights will be restored, post-COVID-19.

Originality/value

This is a “real-time” assessment and will require re-visiting as events unfold over the coming months and years.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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