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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Kurt Matzler, Todd A. Mooradian, Johann Füller and Markus Anschober

In every market there are non-consumers – potential customers that withstand an innovation. A common reason is that products targeted to early adopters or the mass market

Abstract

Purpose

In every market there are non-consumers – potential customers that withstand an innovation. A common reason is that products targeted to early adopters or the mass market are over-engineered. Established companies usually neglect the laggards in a market. This offers growth opportunities for new entrants. These market niches can be unlocked when products are simplified and adapted to the special needs of the laggards.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a short case study from an Austrian producer of cell-phones targeted to seniors, and some other examples, we show how innovative solutions can be developed by targeting to the special needs of laggards in a market.

Findings

Technologies usually evolve faster than market needs and established companies, in their efforts to grow and improve profitability, try to innovate faster than their competitors. This often leads to over-engineered products. In many markets there are consumers that withstand these innovative and over-engineered products. A vacuum for low-priced, simple, and easy-to-use solutions emerges. We describe a five-step approach for unlocking these market segments and developing solutions for laggards.

Originality/value

While most companies try to innovate faster than their competitors to defend their market leadership, laggard innovation targets non-consumers in the market. By simplifying over-engineered products and adapting them to the special needs of laggards, new market opportunities emerge. This paper shows how these market niches can be unlocked.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Kurt Matzler, Florian Andreas Bauer and Todd A. Mooradian

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether transformational leadership behavior is a function of the leader’s own self-respect and his/her evaluation of being…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether transformational leadership behavior is a function of the leader’s own self-respect and his/her evaluation of being capable, significant, and worthy (self-esteem). It is also tested whether transformational leadership is related to innovation success.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 411 entrepreneurs and managing directors of small- and medium-sized Austrian companies. The proposed hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling (PLS).

Findings

A strong and significant relationship between self-esteem and transformational leadership was found. Furthermore, data analyses revealed that transformational leadership has a positive impact on innovation success.

Originality/value

This study reveals the important but heretofore neglected role of self-esteem, defined as a manager’s overall self-evaluation of his/her competences, as an important predictor of transformational leadership.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2021

Mohammad S. Najjar, Laila Dahabiyeh and Raed Salah Algharabat

Mobile device users are frequently faced with a decision to allow access to their personal information that resides on their devices in order to install mobile…

Abstract

Purpose

Mobile device users are frequently faced with a decision to allow access to their personal information that resides on their devices in order to install mobile applications (apps) and use their features. This paper examines the impact of satisfaction on the intention to allow access to personal information. The paper achieves this by acknowledging the affective and cognitive components of satisfaction derived from affect heuristic and privacy calculus theories, respectively.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data was collected from mobile device users who download and install mobile apps on their devices. Overall, 489 responses were collected and analyzed using LISREL 8.80.

Findings

The findings suggest that personal information disclosure decision is mainly a matter of being satisfied with the mobile app or not. We show that perceived benefits are more critical than perceived risks in determining satisfaction, and that perceived benefits influence intention to allow access to personal information indirectly through satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study offers a more nuanced analysis of the influence of satisfaction by examining the role of its two components: the cognitive (represented in perceived benefits and perceived risks) and the affective (represented in affect). We show that information disclosure decision is a complicated process that combines both rational and emotional elements.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Russell K.H. Ching, Pingsheng Tong, Ja‐Shen Chen and Hung‐Yen Chen

Drawing on extant literature on narrative persuasion, online advertising, and transportation theory, this research aims to study Internet‐based online narrative…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on extant literature on narrative persuasion, online advertising, and transportation theory, this research aims to study Internet‐based online narrative advertising and investigate the effects of four pertinent advertising design elements, interactivity, entertainment, vividness, and self‐referencing, on consumer products and the moderating effects of advertisement involvement on these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using an online questionnaire that contained measures adapted from prior studies. Participants first selected a product that they would seriously consider purchasing and answered a set of questions prior to viewing a narrative online advertisement, which was followed by a different set of questions. Structural equation modeling was used to empirically test the authors’ proposed model.

Findings

Greater levels of interactivity, vividness, entertainment, and self‐referencing in narrative online advertisements led to more favorable attitudes toward a product. In particular, self‐referencing had a substantial effect on transportation in forming product attitudes. Advertisement Involvement moderates (i.e. enhances) the effect of self‐referencing on attitudes toward a product.

Practical implications

If properly designed, a narrative online advertisement can fully utilize Internet‐enabled features and can maximize their potential to produce a favorable consumer attitude toward a featured product.

Originality/value

This study advances narrative advertising research and provides empirical evidence to highlight the effects of the pertinent characteristics of Internet‐based advertising, interactivity and entertainment in the conversion process of transportation and consumer attitudes. Moreover, this study identifies and sheds light on important contingencies (i.e. advertisement involvement) of the focal relationships.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2013

Jee Teck Weng and Ernest Cyril de Run

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of Malaysian consumers' personal values and sales promotion preferences on their overall behavioural intention and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of Malaysian consumers' personal values and sales promotion preferences on their overall behavioural intention and purchase satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 1,300 questionnaires were distributed and collected by hand through hired enumerators in 13 different states in Malaysia (Johor, Kedah, Kelantan, Melaka, Negeri Sembilan, Pahang, Perak, Perlis, Pulau Pinang, Sabah, Sarawak, Selangor and Terengganu). This research was carried out for four different type of consumer product (convenience, shopping, specialty/luxury and unsought product). Data were analysed using General Linear Model-Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) and General Linear Model-Univariate Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) to test for difference between independent and dependent variables.

Findings

The findings suggest that sales promotion technique preferences will have an impact on consumers' behavioural intention and purchase satisfaction for all the product types studied. On the other hand, there is no significant impact in consumers' purchases satisfaction and behavioural intention by personal value for all the product type studied.

Practical implications

The findings from this research have expanded current knowledge and academic studies done on similar areas of research where this research detail the association of personal value and sales promotion techniques preferences on consumers' purchase satisfaction (attitude) and behavioural intention (behaviour) for different types of consumer products. The research suggests to managers in Malaysia that it is crucial to understand the characteristics of their products when selecting appropriate strategies and sales promotion techniques for better market segmentation and targeting.

Originality/value

This research is the first of its type where only a minimal number of studies have looked into these issues (personal values and sales promotion techniques preferences) from a business perspective.

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Narasimha Rao Vajjhala and Kenneth David Strang

The researchers in this study reviewed the literature to locate the most relevant multicultural theories, factors, and instruments in order to measure Albania's national…

Abstract

Purpose

The researchers in this study reviewed the literature to locate the most relevant multicultural theories, factors, and instruments in order to measure Albania's national culture. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

An innovative combination of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis was used to fit the multicultural construct to the sample data and then estimate the national culture (n=73). The multicultural indexes were calculated for five generally accepted national culture factors to compare with the benchmarks published in the literature.

Findings

The multicultural indexes were calculated for five generally accepted national culture factors to compare with the benchmarks published in the literature. An asymmetric plot was created for critical comparison of Albania with five other theoretically selected countries, using the indexes for PDi, ICi, MFi, UAi, and LTi. Albania was found to be most similar to its Balkan and Turkish neighbors, as compared with Asian or Western cultures such as that of the USA.

Research limitations/implications

The researchers discussed the implications of knowing Albania's national culture profile with reference to how other countries might collaborate and transact with this emerging transition economy.

Practical implications

From a business standpoint, the multicultural indexes for Albania provide general indicators of the national beliefs, norms and values, which foreign organizations may compare to their own cultural profile when interacting with professionals in this country. The best use for such indexes is for benchmarking and comparison. Foreign government, private corporations, or nonprofit organizations may compare their own culture profile with that of Albania to be aware of the similarities and differences.

Originality/value

Albanian national culture was estimated for the first time in the literature, using a five-factor model adapted from the work of Hofstede.

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2021

Xuan Quach and Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee

The aim of this study is to profile types of gifters via a set of psychographic consumption traits (frugality, gratitude, market mavenism and novelty seeking) and identify…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to profile types of gifters via a set of psychographic consumption traits (frugality, gratitude, market mavenism and novelty seeking) and identify differences among the groups regarding their gift-purchasing behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the data from 193 participants, the authors seek to identify and profile unique consumer segments (gifters) generated from the four psychographic consumption traits. Second, once the segments are established, the authors analyze how the segments differ across 16 unique gift-purchasing behaviors.

Findings

The data generated four distinct consumer segments: experiential gifters, considerate gifters, convenience gifters and astute gifters. Across the segments, there were differences in their gift consumption behavior (e.g. time/effort spent, desire for customization, gift presentation, derived joy, purchasing frequency, eco-friendliness, seeking assistance, regifting and more).

Research limitations/implications

US-based sample was collected via an online panel in January; this may restrict the generalizability of the research, given that gift consumption customs may vary across different countries. Thus, future research should include participants from other geographic regions to increase the external validity of the research.

Practical implications

Retail managers can use this knowledge to devise marketing strategies focused on the gift-purchasing behaviors of each group.

Originality/value

Segmenting clusters based on differences in consumption traits provides insights to retailers looking to build a competitive advantage, particularly in a gift purchasing context.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Peyman Akhavan, S. Mahdi Hosseini, Morteza Abbasi and Manuchehr Manteghi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of socio-psychological factors from different theoretical perspectives, as well as the roles of technological and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of socio-psychological factors from different theoretical perspectives, as well as the roles of technological and cultural facilitators on knowledge sharing (KS) behaviors and whether it leads to superior employees’ innovative work behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Partial least squares analysis was used to investigate the research model based on a survey of 257 employees from 22 high-tech companies (including companies in pharmaceutical, nano technological, biotechnological, aviation, and aerospace industries) in Iran.

Findings

The results supported the effects of three motivational factors, i.e. perceived loss of knowledge power, perceived reputation enhancement, and perceived enjoyment in helping others, and two social capital factors, i.e. social interaction ties and trust, on employees’ attitude toward KS. Findings also indicated that employees’ KS behaviors enhance their innovative work behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

Since the survey used cross-sectional data and samples here were limited to some Iranian companies, the results of this study may prove not to be generalizable and should be confirmed using larger samples and/or longitudinal studies.

Practical implications

The findings provide useful insights into how managers should encourage employees’ KS attitudes, intentions, and behaviors to foster innovative work behaviors of employees.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first attempts to fill the void in integrative research for examining relationships among KS determinants, behaviors, and outcomes.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 67 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2017

Yun-Chia Tang, Yi-Ching Hsieh and Hung-Chang Chiu

The purpose of this study is to determine how and when choice variety influences consumers’ willingness to purchase, according to a personal emotion perspective. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine how and when choice variety influences consumers’ willingness to purchase, according to a personal emotion perspective. The choice paradox indicates that although having many choices can be beneficial, it can also cause customer decision paralysis and unhappiness. This article proposes that the desire and motivation to process information vary from person to person, and emotional factors are relevant.

Design/methodology/approach

With a 2 × 2 experimental design, this study examines the influence of the interaction of choice variety with need for cognition (NFC) on positive and negative emotions, and then tests the mediating effects on purchase intentions. The sample includes 214 college students, assigned randomly to self-assessment questionnaires.

Findings

Both high NFC respondents in the high variety condition and low NFC respondents in the low variety condition exhibit more positive emotions than low NFC respondents in the high variety condition but not more than high NFC respondents in the low variety condition. Positive (negative) emotions increase (decrease) consumers’ purchase intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The experiment was conducted in a virtual store, which may not match real-life store environments or reflect participants’ actual purchase behaviours, so additional research should consider the influence of involvement further.

Practical implications

The results offer suggestions for developing more effective communication with emotions, increasing involvement to maintain consumers’ positive emotions and relieve their confusion, and managing product variety.

Originality/value

This article meets the identified need to study how choice variety influences consumers’ willingness to purchase from a personal emotion perspective.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Irfan Ullah, Bilal Mirza and Amber Jamil

Recent research studies have increasingly suggested leadership as a major antecedent to encourage innovative work behavior among business employees. Empirical studies…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent research studies have increasingly suggested leadership as a major antecedent to encourage innovative work behavior among business employees. Empirical studies which investigated the influence of various leadership aspects such as style and ethics on employees' innovative performance and unraveled the mechanism through which leadership exerts its impact on employees' innovative work behavior were restricted. Thus, the purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between ethical leadership and employees' innovative performance by focusing on the mediating role of two forms of the intellectual capital (IC), i.e. human capital and social capital.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for present research were collected through in person administered questionnaire-based survey from the managerial level employees of the targeted sample of the manufacturing firms. Furthermore, due consideration was given while selecting the individuals from R&D departments of these organizations, who were typically involved in knowledge-intensive jobs and where application of intellectual assets was needed.

Findings

Ethical leadership was observed as to positively influencing employees' innovative performance. Two forms of IC, i.e. human capital and social capital were observed as playing mediating role in the ethical leadership – employees' innovative performance relationship.

Originality/value

The contemporary research study adds value in the literature of the ethical leadership. The most imperative theoretical contribution of the present research study underlines the psychological process, i.e. IC by which ethical leaders encourage innovative behavior among employees.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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