Search results

1 – 10 of 48
Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Ursula Ploll and Tobias Stern

Vegetarian and vegan dietary practices have recently moved from being marginal activities to occupying a more mainstream position. While the reasons for this have been…

Abstract

Purpose

Vegetarian and vegan dietary practices have recently moved from being marginal activities to occupying a more mainstream position. While the reasons for this have been analysed by many researchers, the extent to which the underlying motives may influence other behavioural contexts remains relatively unexplored. The present research thus analyses the degree to which vegetarians and vegans also act in an environmental and animal-conscious manner.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered survey was conducted among omnivores, conscientious omnivores, vegetarians and vegans in Austria. The research design is embedded in an extended version of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). A mixed-mode sampling strategy resulted in 556 completed surveys.

Findings

The TPB correlation analysis shows that there are significant relations between dietary motives, subjective norms, attitudes, behavioural intentions and the behaviour in question. When considering all dietary groups, the results indicate that the differentiation in behaviour is impacted by dietary identity: the stricter the diet, the stronger the behaviour related to animal-wellbeing and environmental protection.

Originality/value

First, this research evaluated motivational drivers through a pairwise comparison, which resulted in strength factors instead of single motivational driver. Second and foremost, this research draws a connection between dietary categories and the wider behavioural implications related to these identities and their underlying motivational drivers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 February 2009

Tobias Stern, Rainer Haas and Oliver Meixner

The aim of this paper is to investigate consumer attitudes to, and acceptance of, affective communication in the context of pre‐knowledge regarding wood‐based food additives.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate consumer attitudes to, and acceptance of, affective communication in the context of pre‐knowledge regarding wood‐based food additives.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 263 Austrian consumers was carried out to investigate pre‐knowledge, attitude and attitude change as a result of affective communication about wood‐based food additives.

Findings

About 14 per cent of the sample had pre‐knowledge concerning wood‐based food additives. In general the attitudes towards wood‐based additives were significantly better than those towards food additives in general. The results indicate a connection between pre‐knowledge and attitude. Respondents who had knowledge about wood‐based food additives evaluated them better, especially in contrast to those who had wrong ideas about them. Furthermore, it proved possible to improve the evaluations of those respondents who did not know about wood‐based additives by providing basic information.

Practical implications

The provision of additional information would improve the marketing potential of wood‐based additives, especially in contrast to additives in general. If the topic is ignored, there is a risk that public discussion could be based on non‐knowledge‐based conceptions by some consumers. The provision of early impact information is suggested in this regard.

Originality/value

Although the use of wood as a raw material in the food industry is common, it has not been a subject of public or scientific discussion to date.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 21 February 2008

Mingliang Li and Justin L. Tobias

We describe a new Bayesian estimation algorithm for fitting a binary treatment, ordered outcome selection model in a potential outcomes framework. We show how recent…

Abstract

We describe a new Bayesian estimation algorithm for fitting a binary treatment, ordered outcome selection model in a potential outcomes framework. We show how recent advances in simulation methods, namely data augmentation, the Gibbs sampler and the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm can be used to fit this model efficiently, and also introduce a reparameterization to help accelerate the convergence of our posterior simulator. Conventional “treatment effects” such as the Average Treatment Effect (ATE), the effect of treatment on the treated (TT) and the Local Average Treatment Effect (LATE) are adapted for this specific model, and Bayesian strategies for calculating these treatment effects are introduced. Finally, we review how one can potentially learn (or at least bound) the non-identified cross-regime correlation parameter and use this learning to calculate (or bound) parameters of interest beyond mean treatment effects.

Details

Modelling and Evaluating Treatment Effects in Econometrics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1380-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 21 July 2016

Abstract

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-360-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1959

D. Spector, H.S. Preiser† and D. Khoushy

During a two‐week voyage of the S.S. Israel from Haifa to New York, experiments were conducted with a platinum‐clad trailing anode system for cathodic protection…

Abstract

During a two‐week voyage of the S.S. Israel from Haifa to New York, experiments were conducted with a platinum‐clad trailing anode system for cathodic protection. Preparation for the voyage and day‐to‐day working of the experiments are described as are the successful efforts made to overcome the mechanical difficulties that arose. Concrete results that emerge indicate a growing and glowing future for such installations on large ships.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2020

Frederik Kunze, Tobias Basse, Miguel Rodriguez Gonzalez and Günter Vornholz

In the current low-interest market environment, more and more asset managers have started to consider to invest in property markets. To implement adequate and…

Abstract

Purpose

In the current low-interest market environment, more and more asset managers have started to consider to invest in property markets. To implement adequate and forward-looking risk management procedures, this market should be analyzed in more detail. Therefore, this study aims to examine the housing market data from the UK. More specifically, sentiment data and house prices are examined, using techniques of time-series econometrics suggested by Toda and Yamamoto (1995). The monthly data used in this study is the RICS Housing Market Survey and the Nationwide House Price Index – covering the period from January 2000 to December 2018. Furthermore, the authors also analyze the stability of the implemented Granger causality tests. In sum, the authors found clear empirical evidence for unidirectional Granger causality from sentiment indicator to the house prices index. Consequently, the sentiment indicator can help to forecast property prices in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

By investigating sentiment data for house prices using techniques of time-series econometrics (more specifically the procedure suggested by Toda and Yamamoto, 1995), the research question whether sentiment indicators can be helpful to predict property prices in the UK is analyzed empirically.

Findings

The empirical results show that the RICS Housing Market Survey can help to predict the house prices in the UK.

Practical implications

Given these findings, the information provided by property market sentiment indicators certainly should be used in a forward-looking early warning system for house prices in the UK.

Originality/value

To authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper that uses the procedure suggested by Toda and Yamaoto to search for suitable early warning indicators for investors in UK real estate assets.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 December 2013

Ivan Jeliazkov

For over three decades, vector autoregressions have played a central role in empirical macroeconomics. These models are general, can capture sophisticated dynamic…

Abstract

For over three decades, vector autoregressions have played a central role in empirical macroeconomics. These models are general, can capture sophisticated dynamic behavior, and can be extended to include features such as structural instability, time-varying parameters, dynamic factors, threshold-crossing behavior, and discrete outcomes. Building upon growing evidence that the assumption of linearity may be undesirable in modeling certain macroeconomic relationships, this article seeks to add to recent advances in VAR modeling by proposing a nonparametric dynamic model for multivariate time series. In this model, the problems of modeling and estimation are approached from a hierarchical Bayesian perspective. The article considers the issues of identification, estimation, and model comparison, enabling nonparametric VAR (or NPVAR) models to be fit efficiently by Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms and compared to parametric and semiparametric alternatives by marginal likelihoods and Bayes factors. Among other benefits, the methodology allows for a more careful study of structural instability while guarding against the possibility of unaccounted nonlinearity in otherwise stable economic relationships. Extensions of the proposed nonparametric model to settings with heteroskedasticity and other important modeling features are also considered. The techniques are employed to study the postwar U.S. economy, confirming the presence of distinct volatility regimes and supporting the contention that certain nonlinear relationships in the data can remain undetected by standard models.

Details

VAR Models in Macroeconomics – New Developments and Applications: Essays in Honor of Christopher A. Sims
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-752-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Hyokjin Kwak, George M. Zinkhan and Elizabeth P. Lester Roushanzamir

Compulsion to buy is an important but neglected aspect of consumer behavior. This research uses cross‐cultural data from the USA and South Korea to study compulsive…

Abstract

Compulsion to buy is an important but neglected aspect of consumer behavior. This research uses cross‐cultural data from the USA and South Korea to study compulsive consumption behavior by focusing on individual factors. Three compulsive consumption behaviors (i.e. compulsive buying, compulsive substance abuse, and compulsive gambling/lottery play) are analyzed via structural equation modeling. The findings reveal that comorbidity (i.e. coexistence of more than two related compulsive consumption behaviors) is found in both countries. With one exception, the predicted personality traits (i.e. obsessive thoughts, risk‐taking tendencies) are significantly related to compulsive consumption behaviors in both countries.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 31 July 2020

Rita Berggren, Johanna E. Pregmark, Tobias Fredberg and Björn Frössevi

The literature on organizational change has long acknowledged the need to balance stability and economic efficiency with the need to be flexible and to change. Authors…

Abstract

The literature on organizational change has long acknowledged the need to balance stability and economic efficiency with the need to be flexible and to change. Authors, certainly in the dynamic capabilities tradition but also in other perspectives, have stressed the importance of more open and loosely coupled systems to promote adaption. However, many organizations do not operate on such premises but rather rely on creating efficient business units through tight coupling, building strict social and administrative control, and jointly relying on common systems. In this study, we conduct 46 interviews with employees from three different retail organizations to investigate how units in such tightly coupled systems change within the framework of the set standards. Through contrasting the characteristics of high and low functioning units, we identify three mechanisms that seem to enable the units to successfully and repeatedly realign and establish new configurations. We conclude that the orchestrator of all three realignment mechanisms is the middle manager, and we discuss the middle manager's role and the different activities that enable a successful realignment.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-083-7

Keywords

1 – 10 of 48