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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Tobias Schaefers

This paper aims to define the niche market concept and to investigate the extent to which purchasing niche products represents a form of conspicuous consumption. Consumers…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to define the niche market concept and to investigate the extent to which purchasing niche products represents a form of conspicuous consumption. Consumers increasingly seek products that differ from the mainstream, and companies regard niche markets as a promising opportunity beyond saturated mass markets.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on survey data that combines self-report scales and actual purchase decisions, the effects of different dimensions of conspicuous consumption on niche product choice are investigated using binary logistic regression.

Findings

Choosing niche products over mass market products is mainly influenced by differentiation tendencies. Moreover, consumers use niche products to strengthen their role as opinion leaders. Choice of mass market products, on the other hand, is influenced by assimilation tendencies. In contrast to common assumptions, status-seeking consumers are more likely to choose a mass market alternative over niche products.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the conceptualization of niche markets, this study reveals that niche products are a means for consumers to distinguish themselves. Limitations include the focus on a single product domain and country. Future research should replicate the study for other types of niche products and in other cultural settings.

Practical implications

Niche firms should explicitly consider the social effects of conspicuous consumption as a key driver of demand. Specifically, the unique nature of a niche product should be highlighted and recognizable to increase the acceptance among potential customers. Moreover, instead of focussing the status of niche products, marketing activities should address opinion leaders’ desire to maintain their standing among the social group by providing in-depth information and enhanced customer experience.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the call for a conceptual definition of niche markets. Moreover, while previous work focussed on the company perspective, this study allows for an improved understanding of consumer behaviour with regard to niche markets.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 48 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2020

Tobias Kopp, Steffen Kinkel, Teresa Schäfer, Barbara Kieslinger and Alan John Brown

The purpose of this article is to explore the importance of workplace learning in the context of performance measurement on an organisational level. It shows how workplace…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explore the importance of workplace learning in the context of performance measurement on an organisational level. It shows how workplace learning analytics can be grounded on professional identity transformation theory and integrated into performance measurement approaches to understand its organisation-wide impact.

Design/methodology/approach

In a conceptual approach, a framework to measure the organisation-wide impact of workplace learning interventions has been developed. As a basis for the description of the framework, related research on relevant concepts in the field of performance measurement approaches, workplace learning, professional identity transformation, workplace and social learning analytics are discussed. A case study in a European Public Employment Service is presented. The framework is validated by qualitative evaluation data from three case studies. Finally, theoretical as well as practical implications are discussed.

Findings

Professional identity transformation theory provides a suitable theoretical framework to gain new insights into various dimensions of workplace learning. Workplace learning analytics can reasonably be combined with classical performance management approaches to demonstrate its organisation-wide impact. A holistic and streamlined framework is perceived as beneficial by practitioners from several European Public Employment Services.

Research limitations/implications

Empirical data originates from three case studies in the non-profit sector only. The presented framework needs to be further evaluated in different organisations and settings.

Practical implications

The presented framework enables non-profit organisations to integrate workplace learning analytics in their organisation-wide performance measurement, which raises awareness for the importance of social learning at the workplace.

Originality/value

The paper enriches the scarce research base about workplace learning analytics and its potential links to organisation-wide performance measurement approaches. In contrast to most previous literature, a thorough conceptualisation of workplace learning as a process of professional identity transformation is used.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Kai‐Magnus Schulte, Tobias Dechant and Wolfgang Schaefers

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the pricing of European real estate equities. The study examines the main drivers of real estate equity returns and determines…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the pricing of European real estate equities. The study examines the main drivers of real estate equity returns and determines whether loadings on systematic risk factors – the excess market return, small minus big (SMB), HIGH minus low (HML) – can explain cross‐sectional return differences in unconditional as well as in conditional asset pricing tests.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon time‐series regressions to investigate determinants of real estate equity returns. Rolling Fama‐French regressions are applied to estimate time‐varying loadings on systematic risk factors. Unconditional as well as conditional monthly Fama‐MacBeth regressions are employed to explain cross‐sectional return variations.

Findings

Systematic risk factors are important drivers of European real estate equity returns. Returns are positively related to the excess market return and to a value factor. A size factor impacts predominantly negatively on real estate returns. The results indicate increasing market integration after the introduction of the Euro. Loadings on systematic risk factors have weak explanatory power in unconditional cross‐section regressions but can explain returns in a conditional framework. Beta – and to a lesser extent the loading on HML – is positively related to returns in up‐markets and negatively in down markets. Equities which load positively on SMB outperform in down markets.

Research limitations/implications

The implementation of a liquidity or a momentum factor could provide further evidence on the pricing of European real estate equities.

Practical implications

The findings could help investors to manage the risk exposure more effectively. Investors should furthermore be able to estimate their cost of equity more precisely and might better be able to pick stocks for time varying investment strategies.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to examine the pricing of real estate equity returns in a pan‐European setting.

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 June 2014

Vladimir M. Moskovkin, Emilia A. Bocharova and Oksana V. Balashova

– The purpose of this paper is to introduce and develop the methodology of journal benchmarking.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and develop the methodology of journal benchmarking.

Design/methodology/approach

The journal benchmarking method is understood to be an analytic procedure of continuous monitoring and comparing of the advance of specific journal(s) against that of competing journals in the same subject area, together with the application of best practices defined in order to improve a journal's own advance and gain a position among leading scientific journals.

Findings

As a realization of this method, it is suggested to build up a journal scoreboard, which is a matrix of journal indicators, distributed for different journals. For the journal scoreboard on the subject of lasers and optics (36 journals, five indicators) a series of regression equations was built up that allow forecasts to be made for journals’ impact factor levels, depending on the International Collaboration and Reference per Document indicators included in the SCIMAGO database.

Practical implications

The detailed journal scoreboard and prediction calculations allow elaborating strategies and policies for the promotion of journals in the Web of Science and Scopus databases.

Originality/value

The research presents the building up of a journal scoreboard in combination with prediction calculations that can be helpful for improving journal positioning in international Scientometric databases.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 31 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2015

Dekar Urumsah

The concept and practice of e-services has become essential in business transactions. Yet there are still many organizations that have not developed e-services optimally…

Abstract

The concept and practice of e-services has become essential in business transactions. Yet there are still many organizations that have not developed e-services optimally. This is especially relevant in the context of Indonesian Airline companies. Therefore, many airline customers in Indonesia are still in doubt about it, or even do not use it. To fill this gap, this study attempts to develop a model for e-services adoption and empirically examines the factors influencing the airlines customers in Indonesia in using e-services offered by the Indonesian airline companies. Taking six Indonesian airline companies as a case example, the study investigated the antecedents of e-services usage of Indonesian airlines. This study further examined the impacts of motivation on customers in using e-services in the Indonesian context. Another important aim of this study was to investigate how ages, experiences and geographical areas moderate effects of e-services usage.

The study adopts a positivist research paradigm with a two-phase sequential mixed method design involving qualitative and quantitative approaches. An initial research model was first developed based on an extensive literature review, by combining acceptance and use of information technology theories, expectancy theory and the inter-organizational system motivation models. A qualitative field study via semi-structured interviews was then conducted to explore the present state among 15 respondents. The results of the interviews were analysed using content analysis yielding the final model of e-services usage. Eighteen antecedent factors hypotheses and three moderating factors hypotheses and 52-item questionnaire were developed. A focus group discussion of five respondents and a pilot study of 59 respondents resulted in final version of the questionnaire.

In the second phase, the main survey was conducted nationally to collect the research data among Indonesian airline customers who had already used Indonesian airline e-services. A total of 819 valid questionnaires were obtained. The data was then analysed using a partial least square (PLS) based structural equation modelling (SEM) technique to produce the contributions of links in the e-services model (22% of all the variances in e-services usage, 37.8% in intention to use, 46.6% in motivation, 39.2% in outcome expectancy, and 37.7% in effort expectancy). Meanwhile, path coefficients and t-values demonstrated various different influences of antecedent factors towards e-services usage. Additionally, a multi-group analysis based on PLS is employed with mixed results. In the final findings, 14 hypotheses were supported and 7 hypotheses were not supported.

The major findings of this study have confirmed that motivation has the strongest contribution in e-services usage. In addition, motivation affects e-services usage both directly and indirectly through intention-to-use. This study provides contributions to the existing knowledge of e-services models, and practical applications of IT usage. Most importantly, an understanding of antecedents of e-services adoption will provide guidelines for stakeholders in developing better e-services and strategies in order to promote and encourage more customers to use e-services. Finally, the accomplishment of this study can be expanded through possible adaptations in other industries and other geographical contexts.

Details

E-services Adoption: Processes by Firms in Developing Nations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-709-7

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Abstract

Details

Human & Technological Resource Management (HTRM): New Insights into Revolution 4.0
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-224-9

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Tobias Rötheli

This paper aims to analyze forecasting problems from the perspective of information extraction. Circumstances are studied under which the forecast of an economic variable…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze forecasting problems from the perspective of information extraction. Circumstances are studied under which the forecast of an economic variable from one domain (country, industry, market segment) should rely on information regarding the same type of variable from another domain even if the two variables are not causally linked. It is shown that Granger causality linking variables from different domains is the rule and should be exploited for forecasting.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applies information economics, in particular the study of rational information extraction, to shed light on the debate on causality and forecasting.

Findings

It is shown that the rational generalization of information across domains can lead to effects that are hard to square with economic intuition but worth considering for forecasting. Information from one domain is shown to affect that from another domain if there is at least one common factor affecting both domains, which is not (or not yet) observed when a forecast has to be made. The analysis suggests the theoretical possibility that the direction of such effects across domains can be counter-intuitive. In time-series econometrics, such effects will show up in estimated coefficients with the “wrong” sign.

Practical implications

This study helps forecasters by indicating a wider set of variables relevant for prediction. The analysis offers a theoretical basis for using lagged values from the type of variable to be forecast but from another domain. For example, when forecasting the bond risk spread in one country, introducing in the time-series model the lagged value of the risk spread from another country is suggested. Two empirical examples illustrate this principle for specifying models for prediction. The application to risk spreads and inflation rates illustrates the principles of the approach suggested here which is widely applicable.

Originality/value

The present study builds on a probability theoretic analysis to inform the specification of time-series forecasting models.

Details

foresight, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Nanna Wurr Stjernqvist, Ane Høstgaard Bonde, Ellen Trolle, Marianne Sabinsky and Helle Terkildsen Maindal

Whole-school approaches emphasising pupil participation are recognised as being conducive for building social capital, yet how participatory health educational processes…

Abstract

Purpose

Whole-school approaches emphasising pupil participation are recognised as being conducive for building social capital, yet how participatory health educational processes relate to different types of social capital remains unclear. The purpose of this paper is to explore which mechanisms within a participatory health educational process influence social capital and collective actions in the school context, and to discuss children’s agency in such processes.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study design, with the Danish “We Act – Together for Health” intervention, considered as an instrumental case regarding participatory health educational processes for children, principally since it applied the participatory Investigation–Vision–Action–Change (IVAC) methodology. The paper is based on a theory-driven, abductive research strategy. Qualitative methods, including focus group interviews with children, semi-structured interviews with teachers and school principals, and participant observation were used.

Findings

The study’s conceptual framework, which elucidates several mechanisms that interact with types of social capital and collective actions within the school setting, indicates that working with child participation through the IVAC methodology can influence types of social capital and collective actions. It also emphasises children’s limited agency in terms of affecting bridging and linking social capital, norms of reciprocity and collective actions without sufficient support mechanisms at the school and class levels.

Originality/value

The study provides a novel comprehensive conceptual framework identifying the specific mechanisms at different levels that influence social capital and collective actions.

Details

Health Education, vol. 119 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Tobias Schlager, Mareike Bodderas, Peter Maas and Joël Luc Cachelin

There is scientific consensus that employees' attitudes have a fundamental impact on customers' experiences. This paper seeks to focus on how to create favourable employee…

Abstract

Purpose

There is scientific consensus that employees' attitudes have a fundamental impact on customers' experiences. This paper seeks to focus on how to create favourable employee attitudes that are relevant for the creation of the service brand. In this context, the aim is to develop a framework that combines the concept of the perceived employer brand with employee outcomes that are relevant for service branding.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data were collected from a sample (n=2,189) of a worldwide operating insurance company. Data analysis was performed using structural equation modelling.

Findings

First, the findings underpin the idea of a relationship between the perceived employer brand and service branding. Second, the influence of particular drivers for employee attitudes is determined.

Research limitations/implications

Research is based on data from only one company. Furthermore, customer outcomes are not investigated directly. Thus, research needs to be taken further by investigating the creation of a service brand, simultaneously exploring employees' attitudes and customers' experiences.

Practical implications

Influencing customer experiences is a complex process that involves interactions among several stakeholder groups. In order to raise efficiency, it is proposed that companies focus on creating a strong employer brand as this constitutes an efficient way of service branding.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the influence of the perceived employer brand on employees' attitudes, which is especially important in service settings. The investigation of customer‐relevant employee attitudes emphasises the significance of creating a strong employer brand. Furthermore, long‐term effects are considered by investigating the influence of the perceived employer brand on potential employees' identification.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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