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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Geri A. Dino, Kimberly A. Horn and Heather Meit

Presents findings from the pilot study of a gender‐sensitive adolescent smoking cessation programme called Not On Tobacco (N‐O‐T). N‐O‐T is a school‐based programme

Abstract

Presents findings from the pilot study of a gender‐sensitive adolescent smoking cessation programme called Not On Tobacco (N‐O‐T). N‐O‐T is a school‐based programme designed to help teenagers stop smoking or reduce cigarette use among those who are unable to quit completely. A total of 29 adolescents from three high schools in West Virginia participated (19 females and 10 males ranging between 14 and 18 years old). Smoking abstinence was measured using self‐report and was verified by exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) readings. At three months post baseline, total abstinence for programme participants was 22 per cent and reduction rates ranged from 30 per cent to 96 per cent. At four months post‐baseline, 44 per cent of the boys and 14 per cent of the girls reported being smoke free. Findings from this pilot study suggest that N‐O‐T warrants further investigation and redesign with emphasis on more highly prescribed, gender‐sensitive intervention strategies. Consequently, a completely new programme has been developed and is currently being evaluated.

Details

Health Education, vol. 98 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Oliwier Dziadkowiec and Reese Jenniges

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the Wyoming Quit Tobacco Program (WQTP) is used by its subscribers and to better understand how WQTP might be connected to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the Wyoming Quit Tobacco Program (WQTP) is used by its subscribers and to better understand how WQTP might be connected to WQTP outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Provider intake and program use data corresponding to the May 2010 to March 2012 enrollment period (n=6,168) were used. All program flows were constructed using frequencies and crosstabs, based on an initial theoretical model prepared by the program provider. Data were adjusted based on analysis that explored all possible uses beyond those specified by the provider’s theoretical model.

Findings

Although the authors could replicate the structure – the theoretical model constructed by the provider – the authors were not able to replicate all relationships between program components. The authors also found that most individuals signed up and used web-based services. Only a few individuals finished their treatment regimens in the way they were designed to be used by the program.

Originality/value

This is the first case study to use a program flow method to investigate an entire comprehensive tobacco cessation program structure and delivery.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Kimberly Horn, Geri Dino, Xin Gao and Aiman Momani

Presents a feasibility study on the American Lung Association’s new teenage smoking cessation programme, Not On Tobacco (N‐O‐T). Examines participant and facilitator…

Abstract

Presents a feasibility study on the American Lung Association’s new teenage smoking cessation programme, Not On Tobacco (N‐O‐T). Examines participant and facilitator reactions to N‐O‐T, facilitator training, recruitment, participant attendance and retention, and immediate post‐programme efficacy. Programme efficacy was assessed by comparing the quit rates and mean cigarette reduction of high school smokers who received N‐O‐T with those receiving a brief intervention. Findings regarding programme acceptability, facilitator training, recruitment, and attendance and retention were consistently positive. Evaluation data suggested that N‐O‐T is “user friendly” and acceptable for use in school settings. The programme had a significant impact on both quitting and smoking reduction, and furthermore, appeared to be effective for males and females and for young people from different geographic areas.

Details

Health Education, vol. 99 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Pamela Valera, Robert Joseph Taylor and Linda M. Chatters

Introduction. This study examined the association between self-rated physical and oral health, cigarette smoking, and history of criminal justice contact (i.e., never…

Abstract

Introduction. This study examined the association between self-rated physical and oral health, cigarette smoking, and history of criminal justice contact (i.e., never arrested; arrested, but never incarcerated; or incarcerated in reform school, detention, jail, or prison) among African American men and women. Methods. We conducted descriptive statistical, linear regression, and multinomial regression analyses of the African American subsample (n = 3,570) from the National Survey of American Life (2001–2003). Results. Overall, African American women reported lower arrest rates and histories of incarceration than African American men. Additionally, we found that criminal justice contact was associated with lower self-rated physical health and oral health and higher levels of smoking for both men and women. African American women who had been arrested and detained in facilities other than jail had more chronic health problems than their male counterparts. Furthermore, having been arrested or spent time in a reform school, detention center, jail, or prison significantly increased the odds of African American men being a current smoker. Lastly, among African American women, those who had any level of criminal justice contact were likely to be current smokers and former smokers compared to those without a history of criminal justice contact. Conclusion. Addressing the health of African Americans with criminal justice contact is a critical step in reducing health disparities and improving the overall health and well-being of African American men and women. Furthermore, attention to differences by gender and specific types of criminal justice contact are important for a more precise understanding of these relationships.

Details

Inequality, Crime, and Health Among African American Males
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-051-0

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2010

Ciska Hoving, Aart N. Mudde, Froukje Dijk and Hein de Vries

The purpose of this paper is to test the effectiveness of a computer‐tailored smoking cessation intervention, distributed through 75 Dutch general practices (GP) and 65…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the effectiveness of a computer‐tailored smoking cessation intervention, distributed through 75 Dutch general practices (GP) and 65 pharmacies (PH) in a randomised control trial.

Design/methodology/approach

Respondents receive a tailored letter or a thank you letter (control condition). Main outcome measures are a quit attempt, seven‐day abstinence and continued abstinence at follow‐up (PH: three and 12 months, GP: six months). Effect of use and appreciation of the tailored letter are also tested.

Findings

In total, 1,019 smokers are recruited (545 in PH study, 474 in GP study). At 12‐month follow‐up (PH), respondents receiving the tailored letter report quit attempts significantly more often. No main effects are found in the GP sample. However, reading the tailored letter more than once (GP) and talking with others about the tailored letter (PH) are borderline significant predictors of quitting and point prevalence abstinence.

Research limitations/implications

Positive effects of the intervention in a previous efficacy study are not repeated. The possible influence of power, social desirability and testing effect, extraneous events, the availability of the intervention outside the study and data entry issues are presented.

Practical implications

Possible explanations for the results found in the study and improvements of the intervention are discussed. This can guide researchers in future smoking cessation intervention development and testing.

Originality/value

The paper aims to replicate findings from a previously conducted efficacy study under real‐life circumstances.

Details

Health Education, vol. 110 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Marilyn V. Whitman and Phillip Adam Harbison

This paper aims to examine the level of smoke‐free policies in general hospitals and the barriers faced in implementing restrictive policies banning smoking inside…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the level of smoke‐free policies in general hospitals and the barriers faced in implementing restrictive policies banning smoking inside buildings and on surrounding grounds.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was developed to gather data on hospitals' current smoke‐free policies, including the challenges faced when implementing such a policy or the barriers to implementing one. The surveys were directed to the chief executive officers (CEOs) of Alabama general hospitals. Responses from 47 hospital CEOs, representing 46.5 percent of the total population were obtained.

Findings

Over one‐quarter of respondents were found to have restrictive smoke‐free policies. Of this group, over one‐third experienced a hostile response from employees that smoked. Nearly 85 percent indicated that they made smoking cessation resources available to their employees. Of those that did not have a restrictive smoke‐free policy, fear of employee and patient backlash was cited as the most common deterrent against implementing such a policy.

Practical implications

Studies show that restrictive smoke‐free workplace policies have altered employees' smoking prevalence and consumption. Given the recent reports on the dangers of secondhand smoke, hospitals should reduce the risk of exposure to secondhand smoke for employees, patients, and visitors. Furthermore, restrictive smoke‐free policies may help to increase hospitals' bottom line.

Originality/value

A study examining restrictive smoke‐free policies in general hospitals and challenges faced in implementing such policies is absent from the literature. Identifying the barriers faced may help health care facilities to avoid or overcome these barriers when implementing such policies. The paper addresses the issues involved.

Details

Health Education, vol. 110 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Cecilia M. Watkins, Gretchen Macy, Grace Lartey and Vijay Golla

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a statewide assessment of worksite health promotion (WHP) programs to identify the number of comprehensive programs and the health…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a statewide assessment of worksite health promotion (WHP) programs to identify the number of comprehensive programs and the health needs of worksites in Kentucky.

Design/methodology/approach

A random sample of 1,200 worksites in Kentucky was selected to receive the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Worksite Health ScoreCard to collect cross-sectional information on their health promotion practices.

Findings

Few worksites in Kentucky have WHP programs and even fewer have comprehensive programs. More businesses rely on health insurance to treat chronic diseases than WHP programs to reduce chronic diseases. Small companies were less likely than larger companies to have WHP programs and less likely to have intentions of starting a program.

Research limitations/implications

The response rate of 37 percent was a potential threat to external validity. Respondents had to recall activities conducted during the past 12 months, which could have led to recall bias. Response bias was a potential, as many of the respondents were human resources personnel who may not be as familiar with WHP programs in their worksites. Lastly, four sections of the survey had yet to be validated.

Practical implications

WHP programs, if accessible and comprehensive, have the potential to improve the working population’s health status.

Originality/value

Very little information on the availability and effectiveness of health promotion programs at worksites is available. A statewide assessment on WHP programs has never been conducted in Kentucky.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Grant Beebe, Milorad Novicevic, Ifeoluwa Tobi Popoola and Joseph (Jody) Holland

The purpose of this paper is to develop a 5As framework for entrepreneurial nudge public leadership for health and wellness promotion based on two exemplary cases in Mississippi.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a 5As framework for entrepreneurial nudge public leadership for health and wellness promotion based on two exemplary cases in Mississippi.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a “case within a case” study design to develop the 5As public influence framework for entrepreneurial public leadership.

Findings

Based on the investigated cases of healthcare and wellness promotion in Hernando and Charleston, Mississippi, the authors developed the 5As framework for wellness promotion dimensions of awareness, assistance, alignment, association, and assessment. This framework is applicable to the lived experiences of community members, leaders, healthcare providers, and government.

Research limitations/implications

The study results provide a compelling insight into early-stage formation of entrepreneurial public leadership. However, the study results lack generalizability due to the case study approach used.

Practical implications

This study can assist entrepreneurial public leaders and policy-makers align their strategic wellness goals, initiatives, and policies that motivate community members to seek and receive supporting services.

Originality/value

Developing an original framework for wellness promotion useful to both healthcare practitioners and public leaders, this study contributes to the extant literature on public health leadership and proposes mechanisms for addressing community wellness needs. The framework is designed to address public health concerns by integrating public leadership strategies aimed at linking with existing community wellness and healthcare services.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 September 2020

Sudhanshu Patwardhan and Jed E. Rose

The purpose of this paper is to review the barriers in the dissemination of effective smoking cessation treatments and services globally. Offering tobacco users help to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the barriers in the dissemination of effective smoking cessation treatments and services globally. Offering tobacco users help to stop using tobacco is a key demand reduction measure outlined under Article 14 of the World Health Organisation (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). Implementing Article 14 can reap great dividends for the billion plus tobacco users around the world and their families, friends and societies.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the status of the global implementation of Article 14 using available literature on smoking cessation products, services and national guidelines. Discussing innovative approaches being currently explored in South Asia that can lead to faster adoption and implementation of Article 14 globally.

Findings

Major gaps remain in cessation products’ availability and resource allocation for cessation services globally. Current licensed products are falling short on delivering and sustaining smoking cessation. Innovation in cessation products and services needs to build on learnings in nicotine pharmacokinetics, behavioural insights from consumer research and tap into 21st century tools such as mobile based apps. National implementation of FCTC’s Article 14 needs to follow guidelines that encourage integration into existing health programmes and health-care practitioners’ (HCPs) upskilling.

Originality/value

Smoking cessation is a desirable health outcome and nicotine replacement products are a means of achieving cessation through tobacco harm reduction. E-cigarettes are sophisticated nicotine replacement products. Innovation is urgently needed to fill the gaps in smoking cessation products and services, and for converting global policy into local practice. In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), HCPs’ knowledge, attitudes and practice regarding tobacco use and cessation may hold the key to rapidly scaling up cessation support and delivery to achieve FCTC objectives sooner. Additionally, HCPs can play an important role in offering smoking cessation support in existing national health programmes for TB, cancer screening and maternal and child health. Also, widely prevalent smartphone devices may deliver smoking cessation through telemedicine in LMICs sooner, leapfrogging the hurdles of the existing health-care infrastructure.

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Bo Pang, Sharyn Robyn Rundle-Thiele and Krzysztof Kubacki

Evidence indicates that active school travel (AST) including walking can effectively lower levels of obesity among school-age children. Yet Queensland has been identified…

Abstract

Purpose

Evidence indicates that active school travel (AST) including walking can effectively lower levels of obesity among school-age children. Yet Queensland has been identified as one of the most inactive states in Australia where only 5 per cent of Years 1 and 5 children engaged in AST on a daily basis. The purpose of this paper is to explain walking to school behaviour among Queensland children by investigating the explanatory potential of the ecological and cognitive active commuting (ECAC) model.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey of 537 carers in Queensland, Australia was conducted to collect data about demographics and the variables in the ECAC model. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse the ECAC model and the pathways between variables.

Findings

The results indicate that the ECAC model explained 53.4 per cent of the variance in walking to school. Social norms are the dominating factor in the model. Distance to school affects how the ECAC model works by moderating the associations among walking to school behaviours, perceived risks, and social norms.

Practical implications

Changing carers’ social norms and lowering the perceived risks they associate with walking to school should increase the incidence of walking to school in Queensland.

Originality/value

Although the ECAC model was proposed as a comprehensive framework to explain walking to school behaviour, to date, it has not been tested empirically. Informed by a modified ECAC framework this study aims to empirically explore the factors that may be preventing or facilitating Queensland children from walking to school.

Details

Health Education, vol. 117 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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