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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2014

April Anson

To examine the recent popularity of the tiny house movement with a critical eye toward the growing commodification of sustainability in a market that continues to shelter…

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the recent popularity of the tiny house movement with a critical eye toward the growing commodification of sustainability in a market that continues to shelter economic and class privilege, despite that the movement itself emerges from a desire to consume less and contribute to community more.

Methodology/approach

Written from the position of a tiny house builder and dweller, this study reads a range of recently published accounts of the tiny house movement, informed by contemporary work in environmental sociology. Investigates current rhetoric surrounding the movement with special attention to issues of mobility, consumption, and the movement’s romanticism, with particular attention to the movement’s invocations of Henry David Thoreau.

Findings

Tiny house living can cultivate correctives to possible oversights or entitlements in environmental thought, challenge representations of the movement itself, and encourage those inside the “tinyhouse movement to openly discuss the difficulties and capabilities endemic to tiny living.

Social implications

Tiny houses, while still bound to forms of privilege, hold potential to be what some social science researchers have seen as best practice. Practices that link the practicality of realism with the zeal of romanticism can contribute to what has been found to be a positive correlation between conscious consumption and political activism.

Originality/value

This critique offers a gentle corrective to unmitigated praise of the current tiny house phenomenon in order to highlight the movement’s potential for addressing more pressing social justice and environmental issues.

Details

From Sustainable to Resilient Cities: Global Concerns and Urban Efforts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-058-2

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2020

Billie Ann Brotman

This study aims to examine the permit changes enacted by the city of Portland, Oregon, USA, on the construction and subsequent short-term rental of tiny homes. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the permit changes enacted by the city of Portland, Oregon, USA, on the construction and subsequent short-term rental of tiny homes. The permitting process was eased by the city in 2014. The city’s enforcement of occupancy and rental ordinances, sometimes called Airbnb laws, were tightened in 2019. The new code restrictions are tighter than the rental codes that existed previously.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses time-series data to first consider the thesis that relaxing building permit requirements for tiny homes has encouraged legal construction and increased the number of applications filed with the city planning office. The number of permits was the dependent variable and time-sensitive dummy variable was the independent variable. An adjusted T-statistic was calculated using a least-squares regression model with a moving average autocorrelation adjustment. The second regression model considers the financial relationship between active listings on Airbnb and HomeAway to a housing price coverage ratio and the aggregated dynamic-factor model used to calculate the economic activity index for Portland.

Findings

There were two reported case study findings. The first regression used a dummy variable measuring the application response to permit easing. It was positive and significant. The second finding measures active host listings on Airbnb whether they are directly associated with the calculated multiple of the changes in the S&P/Case–Shiller housing price index low tier divided by weekly employee income. Higher numbers for this coverage ratio suggest that listings on short-term rental platforms are increasing directly with the ratio. The economic activity index is insignificant when predicting the level of listings. Regression results indicate that property owners are financially motivated to list dwellings as visitor rentals and possibly motivated to install tiny homes behind their primary residences as short-term rental units. Local economic conditions do not seem to influence the number of properties listed on short-term rental websites.

Research limitations/implications

Higher coverage ratios encourage property owners to list dwellings on short-term rental websites in the absence of enforceable rental restrictions. Without a method to quickly and feasible identify owners violating short-term rental restriction legislation and enforce fines there is a tendency for active listings to grow in a locale. San Francisco, California, under its new short-term rental ordinance requires online websites such as Airbnb to enforce permit requirements. San Francisco’s ordinance change seems to have resulted in a dramatic drop in active listings available for visitor rentals.

Practical implications

Information published by Inside Airbnb and Airdna does not separate entire dwelling information into categories such as single-family detached houses; tiny homes; apartments; or condominiums ownership types. Even public housing units are sometimes listed as short-term rentals. The aggregate data makes the relationship between active listings and the coverage ratio difficult to interpret. Listing information is limited and only available for a three-year rolling cycle on a quarterly basis for the city of Portland, Oregon.

Social implications

Future research studies could consider how tiny homes might play a role in providing permanent housing to local residents or for providing a shelter for the homeless in cities experiencing acute long-term rental shortages. Does limiting the number of homes available as short-term visitor rentals noticeably increase the quantity of housing and lower the monthly rental rates available to permanent residents of the city? Cities have passed short-term rental codes with the objective of increasing the availability of rental housing available to residents at affordable prices.

Originality/value

Prior research studies focused on who purchases tiny homes; tiny homes used as housing for the homeless; communities composed of tiny homes; and the connection between tiny home living and political activism. The study herein links permit changes to tiny-home building applications. It uses the home price index low tier and the economic condition index for the Portland metropolitan area to predict the number of active listings on Airbnb and HomeAway websites pre-regulation enforcement.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2019

Julia K. Day

This paper aims to provide an example of ways in which research plans may shift and how the research team dealt with necessary changes as they unfolded; within this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an example of ways in which research plans may shift and how the research team dealt with necessary changes as they unfolded; within this context, the authors encourage the use of qualitative and narrative methods prior to and during the design process to better understand the population for which they are designing. Second, the stories from this case study illustrate the importance of understanding the overall context in design solutions, understanding the value of working with residents during the design process and using design as a tool for advocacy and empathy.

Design/methodology/approach

Initially, a traditional mixed method approach was developed to study the feasibility of tiny homes in homeless populations. Responding to unforeseen circumstances, the research team shifted to more appropriate narrative research methods, capturing a profile of the community. The paper shares narrative accounts from the tiny home village residents.

Findings

Overall, the stories from the Portland visit illustrate the importance of social impact and the understanding of the overall context in design. This study also advocates the use of qualitative interview and narrative methods in design research, especially when used to better understand the “houseless” or other special populations.

Research limitations/implications

There were limitations to the research that likely affected the outcomes and the results. The most apparent limitation was the unanticipated shift in methodology that occurred during the research study, which is also arguably one of the best strengths. Also, because of the qualitative nature of this research, the results are not generalizable to a broader context and only valuable or applicable to special cases.

Practical implications

The true human condition of displaced people is often misrepresented in the minds of those who are unaffected. Designers are uniquely qualified to help solve seemingly unsolvable problems but must do so with caution.

Social implications

For those taking on the challenge of designing for disadvantaged communities, this paper reveals that design research is more than just a problem to solve through habitable boxes. This study brings to light several social, economic and design complications that may arise in this vein of research.

Originality/value

This research methodology was unexpectedly altered when unforeseen events necessitated a shift in the research plan. This process revealed that sensitive social issues can be difficult to navigate and must be treated with utmost respect and flexibility. Issues such as affordable housing, homelessness and sustainability are all examples of wicked problems, which designers are uniquely qualified to help solve but must do so with caution and a true understanding of context. Many lessons were learned through this process.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2017

Raissa Pershina and Birthe Soppe

This study explores how organizations deal with divergent institutional logics when designing new products. Specifically, we investigate how organizations approach and…

Abstract

This study explores how organizations deal with divergent institutional logics when designing new products. Specifically, we investigate how organizations approach and embody institutional complexity in their product design. Through a multimodal study of serious games, we identify two design strategies, the proximity and the amplification strategies, which organizations employ to balance multiple institutional logics and design novel products that meet competing institutional expectations. Our study makes an important theoretical contribution by showing how institutional complexity can be a source of innovation. We also make a methodological contribution by developing a new, multimodal research design that allows for the in-depth study of organizational artifacts. Altogether, we complement our understanding of how institutional complexity is substantiated in organizational artifacts and highlight the role that multimodality plays in analyzing such situations.

Details

Multimodality, Meaning, and Institutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-330-4

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Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2017

Abstract

Details

Working with Families for Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-260-2

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2018

Tom Kauko

The sustainability agenda has already become widely recognised in real estate analysis. However, two challenges are to overcome before sustainability issues are brought…

Abstract

Purpose

The sustainability agenda has already become widely recognised in real estate analysis. However, two challenges are to overcome before sustainability issues are brought fully into the professional and academic mainstream: first, the provision of sustainability enhancing qualities; and second, to overcome deep-rooted scepticism towards the higher cost element of such qualities (i.e. creating economies of scale). Another potentially related issue is that the notion of innovation is gaining popularity in this field. Innovation-driven change is cyclical and unpredictable, which in turn calls for an explicit evolutionary and complexity perspective. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Critical literature review. The author’s own experience as participant of the discussions and debates is also used.

Findings

The conclusions suggest that, in line with evolutionary and complexity principles, innovations exist and emerge within the real estate industry itself, and in fields related to it – and this includes various aspects of promoting sustainability thinking.

Research limitations/implications

This contribution uses valuation automata as an example of this argumentation.

Practical implications

The concept of complexity refers to emerging qualities found in the evolution of the development of an industry; the practical implication of complexity concerns the capability of managers to react competently in unfamiliar circumstances.

Social implications

Thus, innovation in real estate is both economic and socio-cultural.

Originality/value

No similar (i.e. theoretically informed) papers on innovation or sustainability in real estate analysis have been written to the best of the author’s knowledge.

Details

Property Management, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

R.G.B. Fyffe

This book is a policy proposal aimed at the democratic left. It is concerned with gradual but radical reform of the socio‐economic system. An integrated policy of…

Abstract

This book is a policy proposal aimed at the democratic left. It is concerned with gradual but radical reform of the socio‐economic system. An integrated policy of industrial and economic democracy, which centres around the establishment of a new sector of employee‐controlled enterprises, is presented. The proposal would retain the mix‐ed economy, but transform it into a much better “mixture”, with increased employee‐power in all sectors. While there is much of enduring value in our liberal western way of life, gross inequalities of wealth and power persist in our society.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 3 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2019

Greg Morgan

Abstract

Details

Rewriting Leadership with Narrative Intelligence: How Leaders Can Thrive in Complex, Confusing and Contradictory Times
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-776-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Maria Sinou

The paper aims to compare traditional and contemporary architecture in terms of their environmental performance. It will demonstrate that the traditional constructions…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to compare traditional and contemporary architecture in terms of their environmental performance. It will demonstrate that the traditional constructions create much more stable and comfortable environments than the contemporary ones.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study used for the analysis is the medieval settlement of Kastro in the Island of Siphnos in Greece. Five representative houses were examined; three traditional and two contemporary. They were measured and monitored for five days in terms of temperature, air movement, illuminance, and surface temperatures; however, this paper will focus on the temperature results.

Findings

The research showed that traditional houses are primarily environmental shelters, as opposed to the contemporary constructions, which failed to provide such an optimum microclimate. The contemporary need for more spacious residences with wider openings, large facades and views to the outside cannot co‐exist with the microclimate created by the heavy mass, compact, with small openings traditional dwellings.

Practical implications

The paper does not suggest that architects should recreate former techniques and morphology, but argues that in the quest for the sustainable building, traditional architecture can offer valuable information.

Originality/value

Traditional climate responsive constructions are proving to be sustainable throughout the centuries, since even today with the new technology and knowledge they perform better than the contemporary constructions.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Abstract

Details

Change Management for Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-119-3

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