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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Zhengyi Zhang, Jun Jin, Ting Wen and Zan Chen

With the fierce competition in a knowledge economy, knowledge-intensive enterprises (KIEs) make technological progress in their catching-up processes through implementing…

Abstract

Purpose

With the fierce competition in a knowledge economy, knowledge-intensive enterprises (KIEs) make technological progress in their catching-up processes through implementing product innovation and process innovation. In this study, the aim is to understand the determinants of enterprise innovation type in China's catch-up environment. Further, this paper intends to deal with two related questions. First, what effect does the internal knowledge base have on KIEs' technology innovation activities? Second, considering the technology gap and technology development speed, what are the different impacts of the knowledge base on the type of technology innovation activities?

Design/methodology/approach

This paper collected data from 212 KIEs in China through a two-stage questionnaire survey, combined with statistical data for research. The hypothesis was tested by regression analysis. Specifically, descriptive statistics and regression analysis are introduced to test the hypothetical relationship between the knowledge base and technology innovation. Meanwhile, multiple regression is used to test whether there is any difference in the influence of technology gap and technology development speed on enterprise knowledge base and technology innovation. Finally, the corresponding robustness tests are done.

Findings

This study finds that in a sample of Yangtze River Delta KIEs, firms' knowledge base influences innovation types. Specifically, the knowledge base width (KBW) and knowledge base depth (KBD) positively influence process innovation, and KBD positively affects product innovation. Regarding the effects of catch-up context factors on KIEs’ innovation choice, a wide technology gap tends to positively influence product innovation in industries with high levels of KBW. Moreover, when technology development speed is high, its potential positive influence on process innovation will be more significant for industries with deeper knowledge bases.

Originality/value

This paper fills the research gap that existing studies ignore the relationship between types of technology innovation and knowledge base dimensions, especially for KIEs. First, this paper deepens the understanding of the impact mechanism of KIEs' existing knowledge base on innovation activities; the unique use of resources by enterprises is the basis of enterprises' competitive advantage and will become enterprises' competitive advantage. Second, this study indicates that against different backdrops of technology gap and technology development speed, enterprises with different knowledge bases will adopt different types of technology innovation activities. Third, this paper shows that a wider technology gap provides broader innovation space, so the technology gap plays a pulling role in KBW and product innovation, thus pushing forward enterprises' technological catch-up.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2020

Wen-Ting Lin, Ying-Yu Chen, David Ahlstrom and Linda C. Wang

This paper aims to use the institutional and information-processing perspectives to explore their association with between internationalization and the Penrose effect…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to use the institutional and information-processing perspectives to explore their association with between internationalization and the Penrose effect phenomenon for business groups (BGs).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use ordinary least squares regression models to test arguments about data pertaining to 101 Taiwanese BGs’ foreign direct investments.

Findings

The results indicate that greater levels of depth and scope in the process of internationalization during one period may negatively affect rates of growth in the following period. The results further demonstrate that institutional distance moderates the relationship.

Research limitations/implications

Using the perspective of information-processing demands, the authors provide alternate explanations regarding the relationship between the process of internationalization (depth, scope and rhythm) and the Penrose effect.

Originality/value

Owners and managers should focus on both the depth and the scope of internationalization. BGs are likely to incur high dynamic adjustment costs, which then limit the rate of BGs’ growth. Managers should balance international market uncertainty with current managerial resources when determining how deeply and broadly to expand internationally and where to enter. In addition, as recent major panel studies suggest, management capabilities and practices can improve significantly, which has a positive effect on firm growth and performance. This does require the careful development and acquisition of the managerial resources needed for internationalization.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2019

Wen-Ting Lin

Ownership issues are an important feature of corporate governance when firms focus on global expansion in multiple and diverse regions. Drawing on resource dependence…

Abstract

Purpose

Ownership issues are an important feature of corporate governance when firms focus on global expansion in multiple and diverse regions. Drawing on resource dependence theory (RDT), the purpose of this paper is to address the phenomenon regarding the extent to which international market distance affects equity stakes in group-affiliated firms held by business group headquarters.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses longitudinal data on foreign direct investments by 106 business groups (BGs), including 561 group-affiliated firms, from Taiwan over a five-year period from 2006 to 2010.

Findings

The results show that the equity stakes of the BG headquarters in the group-affiliated firms in foreign markets were positively associated with the geographic distance between the country of the BG headquarters and the host country of the foreign group-affiliated firms, the cultural distance between the country of the BG headquarters and the host country of the foreign group-affiliated firms and institutional distance between the country of the BG headquarters and the host country of the foreign group-affiliated firms.

Research limitations/implications

Most studies of corporate governance and international business are based on a transaction cost economics approach, a resource-based perspective and agency and institutional theories. In contrast, this study, by using RDT, provides an alternative explanation regarding the factors that affect the equity stakes of parent firms in group-affiliated firms.

Practical implications

This study presents two basic pieces of advice for consideration. First, at the managerial level, group-affiliated firms should develop their own resources and capabilities in order to become more autonomous in pursuing advantageous international activities that the parent firms may not foresee. Second, and again at the managerial level, business group headquarters should adopt a strategy to balance the dependency relationship between group-affiliated firms and business group headquarters.

Originality/value

This study provides the most finely grained analysis, to date, regarding how international market distance affects business group headquarters from newly industrialized economies in terms of diverse equity stakes in foreign affiliates, the unique attributes of BGs and international market distances’ relationship with both the operations and the expansion opportunities of BGs.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Hui-Wen Vivian Tang and Mu-Shang Yin

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of optimal globalization grey relational analysis (GGRA) as a workable decision-making tool to prioritize emotional…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of optimal globalization grey relational analysis (GGRA) as a workable decision-making tool to prioritize emotional intelligence (EI) training needs of specific groups of academic leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved administrating the emotional skills assessment process to 50 academic leaders in the USA and 50 in Taiwan. Optimal GGRA was utilized to prioritize EI training needs of the two distinct groups of academic leaders.

Findings

Results of the optimal GGRA suggest that context-specific EI interventions focusing on enhancing weak areas of emotional competency are made possible through optimal globalization grey analysis.

Practical implications

Optimal GGRA is introduced as a valid decision-making technique for planning effective EI interventions. The results have implications for designing training courses targeting on enhancing weak areas of emotional competency.

Originality/value

The utility of optimal GGRA as a decision-making tool to prioritizing training needs for the two cultural groups of academic leaders in the study aims at going beyond the narrow psychometric perspectives of measurements on leadership potentials and reaching out to practical approaches to leadership development and training.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2008

Shiaw‐Wen Tien, TingTing Chang, Yi‐Chan Chung, Ching‐Piao Chen and Chih‐Hung Tsai

The 21st century is a new century of environmental protection. Environmental protection is one of the most important subject matters yet to come. Moreover, as the public…

Abstract

The 21st century is a new century of environmental protection. Environmental protection is one of the most important subject matters yet to come. Moreover, as the public pays more attention to environmental problems, enterprises should increase their investment in environmental management. Therefore, determining the investment level for environmental management and allocating the investment to associated environmental management activities has become a major task. The principal and agent theory and sales response functions are used for analysis in this research. The allocation of capital investment in environmental management is found to have significant impact on the aggregate sales response, aggregate profit and investment level. Therefore, in preparing the budget for environmental management, enterprises should focus on investment allocation decisions, determine the investment level and allocation method using integrated means, and apply submarket data in the allocation decision‐making process. In other words, in setting the investment level, executive management should take managers’ willingness into consideration. In allocating capital investment, managers should identify the optimal allocation method based on submarket characteristics.

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Shin-Yuan Hung, Jacob Chia-An Tsai, Wen-Ting Lee and Patrick Y.K. Chau

Prior studies examine the relationship between knowledge management (KM) enablers and KM effectiveness. However, the critical role of business process outcome is…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior studies examine the relationship between knowledge management (KM) enablers and KM effectiveness. However, the critical role of business process outcome is neglected. The purpose of this paper is to understand the mediating effect of business process outcomes. Based on knowledge-based view (KBV), two KM enabler variables, KM infrastructure (KMI) and KM capabilities (KMC), and one KM effectiveness variable, market relationships, are included.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted. The sampling frame was obtained from the database of the Bureau of National Health Insurance and Financial Supervisory Commission in Taiwan. After unusable questionnaires excluded, the usable respondents were 256 which are from 63 hospitals and 93 financial firms. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the relationships among KMI, KMC, business process outcome, and market relationships.

Findings

The findings indicated that both KMI and KMC have positive influences on market relationships through business process outcome. The authors also demonstrate how KMI and KMC improve market relationships through business process outcome to deliver the value of KM.

Originality/value

Based on KBV, KMI and KMC are as KM enablers to facilitate KM activities. In the light of professional service industries (i.e. hospitals and financial firms), the study highlights the mediating effect of business process outcomes between KM enablers and KM effectiveness. It furthers the understanding of how KM enablers can improve KM effectiveness.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Wen-Ting Lin and Kuei-Yang Cheng

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of the compensation level and the gap between the chief executive officer (CEO) and the top management team (TMT) with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of the compensation level and the gap between the chief executive officer (CEO) and the top management team (TMT) with respect to the rhythm of firm internationalization.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of an empirical analysis. The authors use longitudinal data (1997-2006) of a sample of 345 publicly-listed firms in Taiwan.

Findings

The results show that higher CEO compensation will lead to regular foreign expansion. The CEO–TMT compensation gap has a curvilinear effect on the rhythm of firm internationalization.

Research limitations/implications

These findings highlight that the compensation structure has a significant influence on a firm ' s internationalization strategy. This research contributes to the literature linking strategic human resource management and corporate strategy in terms of firm internationalization.

Practical implications

When firms consider regular foreign expansion, the compensation committee should design a high total compensation level and appropriate the compensation gap between the CEO and TMT members.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on how the compensation of the upper echelons determines whether the internationalization rhythm is regular or irregular. Moreover, the study examines how internal contingencies, such as performance, moderate the relationship between the upper echelons’ compensation and the internationalization rhythm.

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Fan‐Hua (Alex) Kung, Chih‐Wen Ting and Kieran James

The aim of the research is to use variations in measured accounting conservatism to gain a deeper understanding about the reporting incentives created by a country's…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the research is to use variations in measured accounting conservatism to gain a deeper understanding about the reporting incentives created by a country's institutional structure.

Design/methodology/approach

Geographic proximity, cultural affinity and integrated economic relations provide Greater China with a unique setting for studying cross‐country differences in institutional characteristics which affect the demand for accounting conservatism. Ball and Shivakumar contend that the economic role of conditional conservatism is an important attribute of financial reporting quality because it improves the efficiency of contracting, reduces information asymmetry and improves corporate governance.

Findings

The empirical results indicate that Hong Kong is the most conservative economy, followed by Taiwan and China, implying that the legal/judicial system, regulatory environment and political economy of different countries are the pivotal forces which drive accounting conservatism. Overall, the evidence suggests that a country's institutional structures interact strongly with reporting incentives in determining accounting conservatism.

Originality/value

This research examines cross‐country differences in financial reporting quality by contrasting the influence of country‐specific institutional factors on financial reporting incentives for conservative accounting practices. It is expected that this research will have important policy implication.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Wen-Ting Lin

The purpose of this paper is to draw the perspective of dynamic adjustment costs, the author developed hypotheses regarding the relationships between the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw the perspective of dynamic adjustment costs, the author developed hypotheses regarding the relationships between the internationalization of business groups and first, key leaders of business groups who helped found the groups (i.e. founder-key leaders); second, business groups’ group-level decision teams where the majority of positions are held by members of the founding family (i.e. family-dominated decision teams); and third, business groups’ group-level decision teams where strong ties exist among these teams (i.e. strong-tie decision teams) because group-level top managers are simultaneously top managers of group affiliates.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used generalized least squares fixed-effects models to test its arguments about longitudinal data pertaining to 173 Taiwanese business groups’ foreign direct investments over a period of five years (2004-2008).

Findings

The results show that the presence of a founder-key leader and strong-tie group-level decision teams in a business group can positively affect the internationalization of business groups. However, family-dominated group-level decision teams in a business group can adversely affect the internationalization of business groups.

Research limitations/implications

Using a dynamic managerial-capacities perspective, this study provides alternative explanations regarding the degree of business groups’ internationalization to demonstrate the links among business groups’ key leaders, group-level decision teams, and internationalization.

Practical implications

When deciding whether to expand abroad, managers at a given business group should carefully consider the characteristics of the group's management team because business groups engaging in such expansion are likely to incur dynamic adjustment costs. In this case, the dynamic managerial capacities of a business group play an important role in enabling the group to decrease dynamic adjustment costs. The differences among a group-level key leader's traits, a family-dominated group-level decision team's traits, and a strong-tie group-level decision team's traits will lead to distinct levels of dynamic managerial capacities within the group.

Originality/value

Given the increasing number of business groups entering international markets, this paper rests on the perspective of dynamic managerial capabilities and uses group-level evidence to clarify how the characteristics of key leaders and the characteristics of group-level decision teams in business groups affect the groups’ international expansion.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Joao J.M. Ferreira

Abstract

Details

Management Decision, vol. 51 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

1 – 10 of 239