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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2020

Ana V. Ndumu and Tina Rollins

After the closing of four of the five historically Black college and university (HBCU)–based library and information science (LIS) graduate programs (leaving only that of…

Abstract

Purpose

After the closing of four of the five historically Black college and university (HBCU)–based library and information science (LIS) graduate programs (leaving only that of North Carolina Central University), there is a need to revitalize HBCU-LIS degree program pathways to increase racial diversity in LIS education.

Design/methodology/approach

This mixed-methods study entails survey and interview research with HBCU librarians. The researchers explored participants’ professional experiences and perspectives on creating partnerships between HBCU institutions and LIS graduate programs.

Findings

Participants demonstrated substantial experience, expressed high levels of job satisfaction, viewed pipeline programs favorably and believed that LIS can be strengthened through the inclusion of HBCU educational practices and students.

Practical implications

This study provides recommendations and a model for forging culturally competent and reciprocal HBCU–LIS degree program partnerships.

Social implications

Community-led knowledge of HBCUs can disrupt rescue and deficiency narratives of these institutions. Such prejudices are detrimental to HBCU-LIS degree program partnerships.

Originality/value

Past HBCU-LIS degree program pipeline partnerships did not culminate in research or published best practices. This paper presents literature-derived and community-sourced guidelines along with a model for future initiatives.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 121 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Chockalingam Viswesvaran, Satish P. Deshpande and Claudio Milman

Surveys 200 Malaysian students at a US midwestern university to investigate attitudes towards corporate social responsibility. Refers to previous studies exploring the…

Abstract

Surveys 200 Malaysian students at a US midwestern university to investigate attitudes towards corporate social responsibility. Refers to previous studies exploring the link between corporate social responsibility and financial performance but asserts that there is little empirical evidence on corporate social responsibility and employee attitudes – hence this study. Describes how the survey was carried out (a questionnaire measured on a four‐point Likert scale). Uses t‐tests to evaluate the data. Aims particularly to establish whether or not individuals who value corporate social responsibility exhibit less tolerance of 17 identified counter productive behaviours (such as using organizational services for personal use, padding expense accounts and pilfering organizational supplies). Finds support for the notion that individuals who value corporate social responsibility rate the 17 behaviours as more unethical than individuals who do not especially value corporate social responsibility. Indicates, therefore, that these (more ethical) individuals are less likely to indulge in counter productive behaviour. Recommends ways to back up and extend this research.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Abstract

Details

Value Creation in Multinational Enterprise
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-475-1

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Abstract

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-592-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1989

I. Hoffman and J.S. Koga

Provides a bibliography of CD‐ROM for librarians, covering casestudies, costs, product evaluation guidelines, databases, CDI,downloading/copyright and CD vs. online, for…

Abstract

Provides a bibliography of CD‐ROM for librarians, covering case studies, costs, product evaluation guidelines, databases, CDI, downloading/copyright and CD vs. online, for use when making decisions about the adoption of CD‐ROM.

Details

OCLC Micro, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 8756-5196

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Michael C. Thornton

Newspapers provide the context to how the public understands the role of race and gender in America. Both are portrayed commonly as having lost their power. Taking an…

Abstract

Newspapers provide the context to how the public understands the role of race and gender in America. Both are portrayed commonly as having lost their power. Taking an intersectional approach, here I examine the role race and gender play in black newspaper coverage of Michelle Obama from August 2008 through July 2009. Analyzing 31 papers, gathered from Ethnic NewsWatch, I examine 175 articles, notes, and editorials that addressed the first lady in some capacity. Most narratives highlighted traditional first lady duties, her “family” values and fashion. Female reporters were focused on Obama's values and duties before the election, but emphasized her duties and looks after. Although from December, their reporting was more diffuse, having no particular focus, male reporters also focused on her duties pre-election, but values and looks were relatively unimportant. Race remained an important element in many narratives, especially for male reporters. It was mostly invoked in ways that were ceremonial and abstract, with little attention to the specific plight of black communities. In contrast, female reporters made the intersection of race and gender important (both before and after the election), and Obama's looks (particularly after). Overall, these papers were supportive; and they almost appear in awe of a black family in the White House. As a result, little attention was given to exploring how “change you can count on” would affect black America particularly.

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