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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2020

Leighanne Higgins

Through adoption of the psycho-emotional model of disability, this study aims to offer consumer research insight into how the marketplace internally oppresses and…

Abstract

Purpose

Through adoption of the psycho-emotional model of disability, this study aims to offer consumer research insight into how the marketplace internally oppresses and psycho-emotionally disables consumers living with impairment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws insight from the interview data of a wider two-year interpretive research study investigating access barriers to marketplaces for consumers living with impairment.

Findings

The overarching contribution offers to consumer research insight into how the marketplace internally oppresses and psycho-emotionally disables consumers living with impairment. Further contributions offered by this paper: unearth the emotion of fear to be central to manifestations of psycho-emotional disability; reveal a broader understanding of the marketplace practices, and core perpetrators, that psycho-emotionally disable consumers living with impairment; and uncover psycho-emotional disability to extend beyond the context of impairment.

Research limitations/implications

This study adopts a UK-only perspective. However, findings uncovered that the model of psycho-emotional disability has wider theoretical value to marketing and consumer research beyond the context of impairment.

Practical implications

The insight offered into the precise marketplace practices that disable consumers living with impairment leads this paper to call for a revising of disability training within marketplace and service contexts.

Originality/value

Extending current consumer research and consumer vulnerability research on disability, the empirical adoption of the psycho-emotional model of disability is a fruitful framework for extrapolating insight into marketplace practices that internally oppress and psycho-emotionally disable consumers living with impairment.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Victoria Absalom‐Hornby, Patricia Gooding and Nicholas Tarrier

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the implementation of modern technology by using a web camera to facilitate a family intervention (e‐FI) in the treatment of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the implementation of modern technology by using a web camera to facilitate a family intervention (e‐FI) in the treatment of schizophrenia, within a forensic service.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study using questionnaire tools to measure outcome variables from the web‐based family intervention was used. Pre‐, mid‐ and post‐treatment scores were compared to present the progression of outcomes throughout the study.

Findings

This study provides an account of the successful implementation of a web camera facilitated family intervention in a forensic service. The findings showed improved social, emotional and practical outcomes for the family involved. The ease and acceptability of using the technique is demonstrated.

Originality/value

This study presents a novel application in utilising a web camera to implement family intervention within forensic services with successful outcomes.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Tina Fear, Nancy Carlton, Frances Heywood, Misa Izuhara, Jenny Pannell and Robin Means

Issues raised here are drawn from the findings of a housing investigation that explored harassment and abuse of older tenants in the private rented sector. The project…

Abstract

Issues raised here are drawn from the findings of a housing investigation that explored harassment and abuse of older tenants in the private rented sector. The project examined older people's experiences and raised important links between health and housing. The article highlights financial abuse directed towards these older people and examines implications for professionals and agencies.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Abstract

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Book part
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Luna Glucksberg

Based on a case study of the ‘regeneration’ of the ‘Five Estates’ of Peckham, a neighbourhood located in south-east London, this chapter considers the social implications…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on a case study of the ‘regeneration’ of the ‘Five Estates’ of Peckham, a neighbourhood located in south-east London, this chapter considers the social implications of urban ‘regeneration’ processes from an anthropological perspective centred on concepts of waste and value and highlights the emotional turmoil and personal disruption that individuals affected by regeneration plans routinely experience.

Methodology/approach

An ethnographic approach is used based on participant observation, unstructured and semi-structured interviews as well as limited archival research. Life histories are central to the methodology and these result in the substantial use of long quotes from respondents, to highlight the ways in which they framed the issues as well as their opinions.

Findings

The chapter shows how urban regeneration processes that involve displacements and demolitions deeply affect the lives of estate residents. In juxtaposing the voices and experiences of local politicians, officers and residents it sheds light on the ways in which the values and interests of some individuals — those invested with more power, ultimately — ended up shaping regenerated landscapes. At the same time, the homes and communities valued by the residents who lived in them were demolished, removed and destroyed. They were wasted, literally and symbolically, erased from the landscape, their claims to it denied and ultimately forgotten.

Social implications

The chapter highlights how while the rhetoric of regeneration strives to portray these developments as improvement and renewal, the ethnographic evidence shows instead the other side of urban regeneration as wasting both communities and urban landscapes resulting in ‘state-led gentrification’.

Originality/value

Thinking about regeneration and recycling through waste and value allows us to consider these processes in a novel way: at a micro level we can look at the ways in which individuals attribute to and recognise value in different sets of objects and social relationships. At the macro level we can then observe how the power dynamics that shaped the situation resulted in only a specific view and set of values to be enacted and respected, while all others were silenced, wasted and literally expelled from Peckham.

Details

Social Housing and Urban Renewal
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-124-7

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Tina Wathern and Robert William Green

This paper considers the challenges and solutions in relation to older lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGB&T) housing in the UK. The purpose of this paper is to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper considers the challenges and solutions in relation to older lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGB&T) housing in the UK. The purpose of this paper is to identify the key housing issues and concerns affecting older LGB&T people in the UK, and ways in which these might be addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a practical discussion which focusses on the issues of policies and provision in relation to older LGB&T housing in the UK, both specialist and mainstream housing.

Findings

There is a growing body of literature from both the voluntary sector and academic researchers highlighting the housing issues affecting older LGB&T people. There is a need for both specialist and appropriate mainstream housing provision. However, policy and funding issues constrain the creation and/or development of such provision.

Practical implications

Policy makers and housing providers in the UK need to address, and meet, the diverse housing needs of older LGB&T people.

Social implications

Until their housing needs are met, many older LGB&T people remain concerned about their housing futures, and may end up living in housing which is not their preference and which is not suitable for them.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to provide a comprehensive overview of the work of Stonewall Housing’s network for older LGB&T people, and the challenges and solutions which have been identified in relation to their housing issues and concerns.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2020

Sabine Fliess and Maarten Volkers

The purpose of this paper is to explore the reasons why customers often cannot or do not exit a negative service encounter (lock-in) and to discuss how this affects their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the reasons why customers often cannot or do not exit a negative service encounter (lock-in) and to discuss how this affects their well-being and coping responses. This contributes to the research on how negative service encounters emerge and evolve and how such encounters impact customer well-being and subsequent responses.

Design/methodology/approach

An inductive, exploratory approach was used. Interviews with 20 service customers yielded over 90 detailed lock-in experiences across 25 different services. A multi-step, iterative coding process was used with a mixture of coding techniques that stem from a grounded theory approach.

Findings

Four categories of factors that caused customers to endure a negative event were identified (physical lock-in, dependency on the service, social lock-in and psychological lock-in). Customers either experienced inner turmoil (if they perceived having the option to stay or leave) or felt captive; both impacted their well-being and coping strategies in different ways. Three characteristics of negative events that caused lock-in to persist over time were identified.

Research limitations/implications

This is a qualitative study that aims to identify factors behind customer lock-in, reduced well-being and coping strategies across different types of service encounters. Future research may build on these themes to investigate lock-in during specific service encounters in greater depth.

Practical implications

This research provides insights regarding how service providers can anticipate lock-in situations. In addition, the findings point to several ways in which frontline employees can assist customers with the coping process, during lock-in.

Originality/value

Customer lock-in during a service encounter is a common, yet unexplored phenomenon. This research contributes to a better understanding of why customers endure negative events and how such perceptions are reflected in their experiences and behaviors.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Dandan Ma, Jia Tina Du, Yonghua Cen and Peng Wu

The purpose of this paper is to identify enablers and inhibitors to the adoption of mobile internet services by socioeconomically disadvantaged people: an understudied…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify enablers and inhibitors to the adoption of mobile internet services by socioeconomically disadvantaged people: an understudied population adversely affected by digital inequality.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study combining a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. In total, 32 socioeconomically disadvantaged people explored mobile lottery services and subsequently were asked a series of semi-structured questions about their perceptions of the technology.

Findings

Users’ attitudes toward mobile internet services were ambivalent. They experienced some advantages of smartphones (including escaping spatiotemporal constrains, fashionableness, privacy, and cost-effectiveness) and conceived of mobile internet services in terms of social advantages (including their ubiquitous nature, fitting in socially and fear of being “left behind”). However, they also experienced barriers and concerns, such as limited mobile data packages, external barriers from mobile services (including security concerns, complex online help tutorials, irrelevant pop-ups, and a lack of personalized services) and internal psychological barriers (including technophobia, self-concept, and habitus).

Research limitations/implications

The findings are of limited generalizability due to the small size of the sample. However, the study has implications for understanding the acceptance of technology among socioeconomically disadvantaged people.

Social implications

The study has social implications for bridging digital inequality in terms of socioeconomic status.

Originality/value

While previous studies have primarily focused on enablers of adopting mobile internet services by active users, this study reveals both the promise of and the barriers to the use of such services by inactive users who comprise an under-served population.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 68 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Thomas Diefenbach

The purpose of this paper is to shed some light on the reasons and circumstances why strategic change initiatives based on new public management and managerialism go…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed some light on the reasons and circumstances why strategic change initiatives based on new public management and managerialism go wrong. In particular, how such change initiatives are being justified, communicated, perceived, and implemented within organisational discourses and politics. It reveals personal and group interests behind ideologies, and what change management of this type is really about.

Design/methodology/approach

A strategic change initiative at a large Western‐European university (“International University” – IU) had been investigated between 2004 and 2005 based on qualitative empirical research. Data were gained primarily through semi‐structured in‐depths interviews with IU's senior managers. The findings were triangulated by referring to internal documents and academic literature.

Findings

The case study reveals a whole set of typical characteristics of managerialistic change management approach and how it is communicated. The paper provides insights into the narratives, organisational politics and ideology of change management processes. It draws the attention to the downsides of top‐down change management approaches, to ideologies and interests behind such initiatives as well as intended and unintended consequences.

Research limitations/implications

Academics and practitioners might be motivated to concentrate (more) on the values, ideologies, and interests which are behind “rational” management recipes, to see management and organisational behaviour more differentiated and from a critical perspective.

Originality/value

Organisational change management is usually described on the basis of traditional strategy approaches and concentrates on “technical issues”. By drawing the attention to senior managers' perceptions and interests, and how they pursuit change management objectives on the basis of ideologies, it becomes clearer that allegedly “rational” and “objective” strategic solutions are contested terrain and objects of organisational politics.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 13 November 2015

Elisabeth Dewi

This paper explores the feelings of loneliness, insecurity and vulnerability among Indonesian mothers who lived away from their children while they were working overseas …

Abstract

This paper explores the feelings of loneliness, insecurity and vulnerability among Indonesian mothers who lived away from their children while they were working overseas – outside of Indonesia – as domestic workers. I accomplish this exploration by conducting open-ended, in-depth interviews in the tradition of feminist methodology with 38 respondents, including the mothers and daughters in relation to long-distance mothering, were from West and Central Java. In my research, I uncovered three distinct themes that the previous literature had not explored, these are: (a) leaving her own children behind; (b) who takes care of her children; and (c) the work of taking care of another woman’s children. I have found in my study that narratives were strongly informed by my respondents’ educational backgrounds, occupations, marital status, economic situations, and the overall well-being of their children (especially daughters) at the time of the interviews.

Details

Enabling Gender Equality: Future Generations of the Global World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-567-3

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