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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Sarah N. Keller and Timothy Wilkinson

This study aims to examine whether a community-based suicide prevention project could increase willingness to seek professional help for suicidal ideation among young people.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether a community-based suicide prevention project could increase willingness to seek professional help for suicidal ideation among young people.

Design/methodology/approach

Online surveys were administered at baseline (n = 224) and six months post-test (n = 217), consisting of the Risk Behavior Diagnosis scale; self-report questions on suicidality; willingness to engage with suicide prevention resources; and willingness to communicate with peers, family members, teachers or counselors about suicide.

Findings

A comparison of means within groups from pre- to post-test showed increases in self-efficacy for communicating about suicidal concerns with a teacher, school counselor or social worker; increases in self-efficacy for helping others; and increases in response-efficacy of interpersonal communication about suicide with a teacher, school counselor or social worker.

Practical implications

Young adults need to be willing and able to intervene in life-threatening situations affecting their peers. In step with narrative empowerment education, personal experiences can be used to communicatively reduce peer resistance to behavior change.

Originality/value

Health communicators tend to rely on overly didactic education and awareness-raising when addressing suicide prevention. This research shows the importance of direct and personal forms of influence advocated by social marketing professionals.

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Sarah Keller and Timothy Wilkinson

The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of a senior service advertising campaign designed to increase volunteerism and financial donations among bystanders.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of a senior service advertising campaign designed to increase volunteerism and financial donations among bystanders.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional mail survey was administered to 2,500 adults; 384 usable responses were obtained. Survey responses were analyzed by level of exposure and involvement in senior care.

Findings

High-involvement individuals viewed the ads more favorably and exhibited stronger senior caretaking intentions. Low-involvement consumers were less likely to see their own potential contributions to senior care services as effective.

Research limitations/implications

Characterizing involvement in terms of awareness, awareness involvement, perceived severity and perceived susceptibility, provides a starting point for future examinations of the relationship between involvement, perceived efficacy and various forms of promotion.

Practical implications

From a practitioner’s standpoint, this study identifies specific features of campaign design and audience profiling that might increase the effectiveness of bystander interventions. This study offers not only constructs that can be used for identifying particular audience subsets but also illustrates the practical ways in which perceived susceptibility and perceived response efficacy to a given issue can be addressed through a mass media campaign.

Social implications

Snowballing healthcare costs coupled with an avalanche of baby boomers entering the elderly phase of the life cycle make the need for bystander involvement in the lives of seniors increasingly important.

Originality/value

With limited theoretical and practical guidance on how to motivate bystanders to engage in prosocial behaviors, health communicators and marketers are challenged to address a vast range of public health issues that require citizen engagement. The research reviewed and presented here indicates the hope for engaging the public to become active players in making the nation a safer and healthier place.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2019

William I. MacKenzie Jr, Robert F. Scherer, Timothy J. Wilkinson and Norman A. Solomon

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a systematic review of the research on the quality and value of AACSB International accreditation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a systematic review of the research on the quality and value of AACSB International accreditation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were abstracted from published journal articles between 2003 and 2017 in which the words “AACSB” and “quality” or “value” (or both quality and value) were used in the title or the article text.

Findings

In total, 91 studies were identified that have been published on the value and/or quality of AACSB accreditation. These studies focused primarily on students and faculty and were conducted using survey research methods. Results indicate that accreditation does have some effects on stakeholder value and quality.

Research limitations/implications

While there is evidence to support the importance of accreditation to enhance the quality and value of business schools, additional research is needed to empirically support the quality and value propositions.

Practical implications

In order to effectively communicate to stakeholders how AACSB accreditation enhances the business school, the current study’s findings indicate that identification of indicators and factors that affect quality and value would be productive.

Originality/value

This study contributes insight on what is currently known about the quality and value of AACSB accreditation to both internal and external stakeholders from research conducted over an extended period of time.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2019

Brian D. Bergquist, Dawn L. Keig and Timothy J. Wilkinson

Schools must not necessarily have a large amount of money or advanced finance curriculum for students to get the benefits of participating in a student-managed investment…

Abstract

Purpose

Schools must not necessarily have a large amount of money or advanced finance curriculum for students to get the benefits of participating in a student-managed investment program. Any college or university with motivated students and faculty can have a successful program if they are willing to put forth the effort. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a case study approach to examine specific characteristics of a successful student investment group implementation at a small liberal arts university in the Northwest USA.

Findings

Three student investment group implementation considerations are highlighted in this analysis: establishing an inclusive, interdisciplinary focus in a long-term club vs course format; utilizing all student-led training, governance and investment methodologies; and designing group processes with an emphasis on critical thinking and community outreach.

Practical implications

This case offers encouraging insights for how even a smaller college or university might successfully create and sustain a thriving successful student-led investment group with a relatively limited amount of funding and resources by leveraging liberal arts foundations.

Originality/value

An emphasis on how student-managed investment groups are tied to broader liberal arts foundations potentially helps schools of all sizes understand certain unique underlying value aspects for the students, the business programs and the broader university community.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Lance Eliot Brouthers, Timothy J. Wilkinson and David McCalman

The intent of EC 92 (European Community, 1992) is to unite Europe into a gigantic trading block and turn it into the dominant world trading partner. Presumably European…

Abstract

The intent of EC 92 (European Community, 1992) is to unite Europe into a gigantic trading block and turn it into the dominant world trading partner. Presumably European corporations will then be able to compete head to head with Japanese and American firms. We predict, however, that instead of being a boon to European competitiveness EC 92 will have the opposite effect. Our prediction is based on three assertions: (1) a unified Europe will become protectionist, thereby encouraging foreign direct investment and increased competition in its home markets; (2) a new, unified Europe is a far more favorable business environment for American and Japanese multinational corporations (MNCs) than for European companies; and (3) most European firms are not strategically or operationally equipped to compete in the new EC environment.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Timothy J. Wilkinson, Anna McAlister and Scott Widmier

The purpose of this paper is to offer an assessment of the international direct marketing environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer an assessment of the international direct marketing environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses political, economic, social, and technological (PEST) analysis to investigate the business environment of international direct marketing. This framework is commonly used as a way of assessing the context of international marketing.

Findings

Globalization, technological innovation, and the spread of free‐market governance have created new and interesting opportunities for managers who decide to use direct marketing to sell their products overseas.

Practical implications

For managers considering international direct marketing, a careful assessment of market prospects and a thoughtful evaluation of the PEST environment should maximize potential opportunities while minimizing the risks associated with foreign markets.

Originality/value

This paper provides an overview of the international direct marketing environment and can, therefore, be used by practioners in their efforts to shapes direct marketing strategy.

Details

Direct Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-5933

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Stephen Buser

Abstract

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2012

The aim is to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim is to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

For baseball fans, one of the modern legends that has enriched the sport was the success of the success of the Oakland Athletics team of the early 2000s. The team was one of the poorest, had little marquee talent, and yet through the genuinely radical, iconoclastic strategies adopted by the management team led by general manager Billy Beane it became on of the most successful teams of the decade.

Practical implications

The review provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Jianhong Zhang, Jan P.A.M. Jacobs and Arjen van Witteloostuijn

Multinational enterprises (MNEs) play a dominant role in the international business (IB) literature. Traditionally, by far the majority of IB studies deal with issues at…

Abstract

Multinational enterprises (MNEs) play a dominant role in the international business (IB) literature. Traditionally, by far the majority of IB studies deal with issues at the micro level of the individual MNE, or at the meso level of a sample of individual MNEs in industries. This paper focuses on the impact of MNE behavior through foreign direct investment (FDI) on a country’s international trade, and vice versa. In so doing, this study responds to a recent plea for more macro‐level studies in IB into the effect of MNE behavior on the macroeconomic performance of countries as a whole, particularly developing and emerging economies. In the current study, we focus on the largest developing or emerging economy of all: China. Applying sophisticated econometric techniques, we unravel the causality and direction of FDI‐trade linkages for the Chinese economy in the 1980‐2003 period.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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