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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Timothy W. Cole

Profiles the use of the program Bluestem developed by the University of Illinois for the control of access and authentication. Uses HTTPs and HTTP cookies to identify…

Abstract

Profiles the use of the program Bluestem developed by the University of Illinois for the control of access and authentication. Uses HTTPs and HTTP cookies to identify users from a database held. Discusses the security issues the program is designed to resolve and the current use of the program before outlining future development of the project and the additional uses foreseen.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 15 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Timothy W. Cole and Michelle M. Kazmer

Working with documents in electronic format is inherently different from dealing with materials in print; nor can all electronic formats be considered equivalent…

Abstract

Working with documents in electronic format is inherently different from dealing with materials in print; nor can all electronic formats be considered equivalent. Processing and presenting SGML is not the same as processing and presenting materials in other markup or word processing formats. To maximize flexibility and extensibility, SGML is highly modular, which complicates implementation. Its emphasis on content structure rather than appearance enhances searchability but makes consistent and precise display difficult. Mechanisms used to maximize platform and software independence (e.g., entities, link protocols), though effective, can be used incorrectly or in ways difficult to implement on some systems or using certain software. Difficult questions remain for libraries planning to implement SGML.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

C. Edward Wall, Timothy W. Cole and Michelle M. Kazmer

During 1994, Pierian Press began experimenting with the integration of the concepts and respective strengths of both Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) and MARC…

Abstract

During 1994, Pierian Press began experimenting with the integration of the concepts and respective strengths of both Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) and MARC. These experiments were driven by pragmatism and self‐interest. Pierian Press publishes classified, analytical bibliographies—classical knowledge constructs—which the press and its authors would like to make available for loading on local library systems so that they can function as “maps” unto that subset of literature the respective bibliographies encompass.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Timothy W. Cole

This paper describes an implementation utilizing preliminary Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI) guidelines for expressing Qualified Dublin Core (DCQ) metadata in…

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1301

Abstract

This paper describes an implementation utilizing preliminary Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI) guidelines for expressing Qualified Dublin Core (DCQ) metadata in RDF/XML. Primary source objects used in this research were online versions of articles published in more than 50 academic journals in physics and engineering. Articles were encoded in well‐formed XML. While able to follow DCMI guidelines generally, it was necessary to augment DCQ semantics with local extensions in order to retain desired richness of semantics and structure. Also described is related work, including development of XML schema documents necessary to validate metadata and creation of a transforming XSL stylesheet to “dumb‐down” metadata to simple Dublin Core. As a case study, this research illustrates issues encountered when expressing real‐world DCQ metadata in RDF/XML. Significant initial investment of effort was required to develop RDF facilities and expertise. Pending more applications that exploit RDF, this investment may not be warranted in all domains.

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OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Wei Ma and Timothy W. Cole

This article reports on the creation of a prototype, Web‐based, expert system utility that helps end‐users better navigate the range of library databases available at the…

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1908

Abstract

This article reports on the creation of a prototype, Web‐based, expert system utility that helps end‐users better navigate the range of library databases available at the University of Illinois at Urbana‐Champaign (UIUC). Both librarian‐assigned database descriptors and terms drawn from the controlled vocabularies of the databases themselves are used to thoroughly characterize resources. End‐users then utilize keyword searches and/or menu selections to identify resources most relevant to their information needs. In addition to reporting on the UIUC prototype and the work done to create it, the concerns that gave rise to the project are discussed. Previous work and research elsewhere are summarized, and the more common approaches currently in place in academic libraries today are noted. Plans for testing the UIUC prototype with librarians and end‐users, for evaluating the results of those tests, and for iteratively refining the tool based on those evaluations are then briefly described.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Timothy W. Cole, William H. Mischo, Thomas G. Habing and Robert H. Ferrer

Describes an approach to the processing and presentation of online full‐text journals that utilizes several evolving information technologies, including extensible markup…

Abstract

Describes an approach to the processing and presentation of online full‐text journals that utilizes several evolving information technologies, including extensible markup language (XML) and extensible stylesheet language transformations (XSLT). Discusses major issues and trade‐offs associated with these technologies, and also specific lessons learned from our use of these technologies in the Illinois Testbed of full‐text journal articles. Focuses especially on issues associated with the representation of documents in XML, techniques to create and normalize metadata describing XML document instances, XSLT features employed in the Illinois Testbed, and trade‐offs of different XSLT implementation options. Pays special attention to techniques for transforming between XML and HTML formats for rendering in today’s commercial Web browsers.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Timothy W. Cole, Myung-Ja K. Han, Maria Janina Sarol, Monika Biel and David Maus

Early Modern emblem books are primary sources for scholars studying the European Renaissance. Linked Open Data (LOD) is an approach for organizing and modeling information…

Abstract

Purpose

Early Modern emblem books are primary sources for scholars studying the European Renaissance. Linked Open Data (LOD) is an approach for organizing and modeling information in a data-centric manner compatible with the emerging Semantic Web. The purpose of this paper is to examine ways in which LOD methods can be applied to facilitate emblem resource discovery, better reveal the structure and connectedness of digitized emblem resources, and enhance scholar interactions with digitized emblem resources.

Design/methodology/approach

This research encompasses an analysis of the existing XML-based Spine (emblem-specific) metadata schema; the design of a new, domain-specific, Resource Description Framework compatible ontology; the mapping and transformation of metadata from Spine to both the new ontology and (separately) to the pre-existing Schema.org ontology; and the (experimental) modification of the Emblematica Online portal as a proof of concept to illustrate enhancements supported by LOD.

Findings

LOD is viable as an approach for facilitating discovery and enhancing the value to scholars of digitized emblem books; however, metadata must first be enriched with additional uniform resource identifiers and the workflow upgrades required to normalize and transform existing emblem metadata are substantial and still to be fully worked out.

Practical implications

The research described demonstrates the feasibility of transforming existing, special collections metadata to LOD. Although considerable work and further study will be required, preliminary findings suggest potential benefits of LOD for both users and libraries.

Originality/value

This research is unique in the context of emblem studies and adds to the emerging body of work examining the application of LOD best practices to library special collections.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Timothy W. Cole and Sarah L. Shreeves

In the fall of 2002, the University of Illinois Library at Urbana‐Champaign received a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to implement a…

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1538

Abstract

In the fall of 2002, the University of Illinois Library at Urbana‐Champaign received a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to implement a collection registry and item‐level metadata repository for digital collections and content created by or associated with projects funded under the IMLS National Leadership Grant (NLG) program. When built, the registry and metadata repository will facilitate retrieval of information about digital content related to past and present NLG projects. The process of creating these services also is allowing us to research and gain insight into the many issues associated with implementing such services and the magnitude of the potential benefit and utility of such services as a way to connect, bring together, and make more visible a broad range of heterogeneous digital content. This paper describes the genesis of the project, the rationale for architectural design decisions, challenges faced, and our progress to date.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Timothy W. Cole

The tradition of union catalogs and similar broad‐based, comprehensive bibliographic utilities and tools is one of long standing in the discipline of librarianship. As we…

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1264

Abstract

The tradition of union catalogs and similar broad‐based, comprehensive bibliographic utilities and tools is one of long standing in the discipline of librarianship. As we move towards greater reliance on digital primary sources, the sharing of information about what we hold in our digital collections intuitively seems of increasing import and value as a way to organize and manage the explosion of online information resources. The Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting enables effective and efficient sharing of digital metadata and is being utilized across a wide spectrum of disciplines and digital library projects. Experience to date gives reason for optimism and provides evidence and confirmation that, even as the technologies we use evolve, the intellectual framework of our tradition persists and continues to be relevant.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Sarah L. Shreeves, Joanne S. Kaczmarek and Timothy W. Cole

In July of 2001, with funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the University of Illinois at Urbana‐Champaign undertook a project to test the efficacy of using the…

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1544

Abstract

In July of 2001, with funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the University of Illinois at Urbana‐Champaign undertook a project to test the efficacy of using the Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting to construct a search and discovery service focused on information resources in the domain of cultural heritage. To date, the Illinois project has indexed over two million Dublin Core metadata records contributed by 39 metadata repositories in the museum, academic library, and digital library project communities. These records describe a mix of digital and analog primary content. Our analysis of these metadata records demonstrates wide divergence in descriptive metadata practices and the use and interpretation of Dublin Core metadata elements. Differences are particularly notable by community. This article provides an overview of the Illinois project, presents quantitative data about divergent metadata practices and element usage patterns, and details implications for metadata providers and harvesting services.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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