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Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2002

John D. Blair, Starr A. Blair, Myron D. Fottler, Timothy W. Nix, G. Tyge Payne and Grant T. Savage

How health care managers make sense of stakeholders and act strategically within these inter-organizational relationships has significant impact on organizational survival…

Abstract

How health care managers make sense of stakeholders and act strategically within these inter-organizational relationships has significant impact on organizational survival and performance. Existing research on stakeholder management has focused on managing dyadic relationships with individual stakeholders. We propose, based on serendipitous findings from a prior research study, that organizations exhibit distinct configurations — stakeholder management styles — in the ways in which they manage their kwy stakeholders. To explicate this notion, we review potential theoretical configurations of stakeholder management styles, including a well-known stakeholder typology, which focuses on the concepts of threat and cooperation. Based on this review, we develop a typology that shifts the focus from individual stakeholders to a focus on the organizations and their orientation toward managing a portfolio of stakeholders. We use secondary data analyses of a national sample of 686 medical group executives to conduct an exploratory study of how and whether stakeholder management styles are likely to impact multiple indicators of organizational performance. We conclude with propositions for future research, as well as implications for managerial practice.

Details

Advances in Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-176-7

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2004

John D Blair, Robert K Keel, Timothy W Nix and K.Wade Vlosich

When modeling environmental jolts from terrorist attacks, various aspects should be analyzed in order to properly present an accurate configuration. The following article…

Abstract

When modeling environmental jolts from terrorist attacks, various aspects should be analyzed in order to properly present an accurate configuration. The following article discusses how asymmetrical warfare has an impact on the outcomes of a terrorist attack. The several dimensions of terrorist attacks can be extracted to deduce the ways that asymmetrical warfare can damage the health care system. The article will relate real life terrorist attacks and hypothetical scenarios to better inform the reader about the weak attacking the strong, and then explain how this relates to health care providers.

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Bioterrorism Preparedness, Attack and Response
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-268-9

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Abstract

Details

Bioterrorism Preparedness, Attack and Response
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-268-9

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Abstract

Details

Bioterrorism Preparedness, Attack and Response
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-268-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2002

Abstract

Details

Advances in Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-176-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2002

Abstract

Details

Advances in Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-176-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 May 2020

Arinola Adefila, Amal Abuzeinab, Timothy Whitehead and Muyiwa Oyinlola

This paper develops a novel user-acceptance model for circular solutions to housing design. The model has been systematically developed from a case study of an upcycled…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper develops a novel user-acceptance model for circular solutions to housing design. The model has been systematically developed from a case study of an upcycled plastic bottle building in a low-income community in Nigeria. It is common practice to use participatory approaches to consult end users in communities, typically after design concepts have been proposed and conceptualised. However, this often leads to critical socio-cultural or usability elements being overlooked and the design being substandard. Therefore, this paper develops a robust model for designers, specialists and activists involved in construction that can be used during all phases of a project. This approach demonstrates that user needs should be considered before building designs and plans are generated, providing a greater frame of reference for practitioners, consultants and end users. Enabling the integration of holistic needs of the community and the development of circular design solution.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study methodology has been employed to develop this model, uses appreciative inquiry methodology. This includes multiple methods to capture end users’ perception: focus groups, interactions with the local community and self-recorded comments. This case study is part of a broader research project to develop replicable low-cost self-sufficient homes utilising local capacity using upcycled, locally available materials.

Findings

The findings identify the challenges associated with designing circular solution housing without a robust understanding of interrelated factors, which ensure sustainability and user acceptance. The conclusions demonstrate why essential socio-cultural factors, usually unrelated to technical development, should be understood and contextualised when designing sustainable solutions in low/middle-income communities. The authors argue that without this holistic approach, undesirable consequences may arise, often leading to more significant challenges. Instead of referring to multiple frameworks, this distinctive model can be used to evaluate user acceptance for low-cost housing in particular and other dimensions of circular solution design that involve end-user acceptance. The model blends circular solution dimensions with user-acceptance concerns offering a guide that considers essential features that are both user-friendly and pragmatic, such as utility, technological innovation and functionality as well as their intersectionality.

Research limitations/implications

The research relied on a single case study, which focussed on end-user engagement of upcycling waste materials as an application of circular solutions. The model will contribute to developing socially accepted circular solutions taking into consideration local context factors.

Originality/value

The paper is proposing a model for user acceptance of circular construction materials relevant to low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2012

Andrew L. Wiley, Melody Tankersley and Andrea Simms

Although we have improved identification of and access to evidence-based interventions for addressing student problem behavior, teacher use of these practices remains low…

Abstract

Although we have improved identification of and access to evidence-based interventions for addressing student problem behavior, teacher use of these practices remains low. In this chapter, we examine teachers’ causal attributions for student problem behavior and their implications for use of effective school-based behavioral interventions and supports. Attribution theory and research suggest that causal attributions strongly influence how individuals (e.g., teachers) perceive and respond to the problem behavior of others (e.g., students). Teacher perception regarding problem behavior and appropriate responses to it can be a significant barrier to the adoption and sustained implementation of empirically supported practices. In light of these factors, causal attribution theory and research can be used as a framework for better understanding and even changing teacher beliefs related to acceptance, implementation, and sustained use of effective behavior management practices. In this chapter, we make the case for cultivating an understanding of teachers’ causal attributions of student problem behavior and considering implications of causal attributions in future research. We explore how such research endeavors can potentially positively impact teacher implementation of effective school-based behavioral interventions and supports.

Details

Classroom Behavior, Contexts, and Interventions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-972-1

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Wesley S. Randall, David R. Nowicki, Gopikrishna Deshpande and Robert F. Lusch

The purpose of this paper is to describe the conversion of knowledge into value by examining the confluence of service-dominant logic (S-D logic), supply chain management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the conversion of knowledge into value by examining the confluence of service-dominant logic (S-D logic), supply chain management (SCM), human resource management (HRM), and neuroeconomics. S-D logic suggests that knowledge is the raw material of value creation. SCM provides an organized foundation to study the conversion of raw materials into value. HRM recognizes the centrality of human decisions in the process of converting knowledge into value. Neuroscience gives insight into the efficiency and effectiveness of the human decisions processes. Global SCM provides more than markets and raw materials – global SCM provides the human resources central to value creation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper combines literature review with interviews from members of supply chain teams engaged in performance-based logistics (PBL) to develop a model of the S-D logic knowledge conversion process.

Findings

The model describes individual-based decision constructs managers can expect to face as they convert knowledge, from a global supply chain team, into value. The model relates the decision maker mindset, based in neuroscience principals, to the efficiency of the knowledge conversion process. These principals are extended to suggest how managers can modulate human resource processes to improve the efficiency of economic exchange and increase supply chain resiliency.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides theoretical and practical insight into how differences in culture, neuronal predisposition, and genetics may influence managerial decisions. These findings provide a mechanism that researchers and managers may take to expand the boundaries of HRM in a global supply chain.

Originality/value

This work uses a foundation of SCM research to explain efficient conversion in a knowledge-based economy. This perspective demonstrates the criticality of global HRM mindsets and decision processes necessary to achieve competitive advantage in a knowledge-based economy. This provides a context for the study and improvement of neuroeconomic efficiency of firms.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 44 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Miguel González-Loureiro, Marina Dabic and Francisco Puig

The purpose of this paper is to aim at proposing a research agenda in the intersection of strategic supply chain management and logistics (SCML) of global organizations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to aim at proposing a research agenda in the intersection of strategic supply chain management and logistics (SCML) of global organizations from the perspective of international human resource management (IHRM).

Design/methodology/approach

To disclose the intellectual structure of research to date across both fields, the content of up to 280 articles dealing with IHRM and 174 papers addressing challenges in SCML in global organizations from a human resource management (HRM) viewpoint were analyzed. A stepwise hierarchical cluster and discriminant analysis were conducted to map a joint research agenda. Approaches from Upper Echelons theory and Co-Evolutionary theory of global organizations were adopted.

Findings

Top management teams (TMT) are crucial to manage SCML successfully in today’s global organizations. Research on this intersection should draw attention to find antecedents, consequences and the process showing how those talented people grouped in dispersed teams can be a source of competitive advantage. Six different areas of research are proposed. It is proposed that future research should focus on the human capital (HC); meaning those key individuals of an organization that make things happen. In the near future, the global organization’s competitiveness will be shaped by how the organization manages its HC in SCML. Methodologies such as meta-analysis are suggested to summarize the extant literature on IHRM when applied to SCML in global organizations.

Research limitations/implications

The search was conducted in SSCI-ISIWoK and Scopus databases. As a limitation, some articles and other scientific contributions not abstracted there were not included. Nevertheless, both searches enabled obtaining balanced results between scope and richness of content.

Originality/value

Only a marginal portion of literature reviews have been conducted by using mixed methods in the fields of IHRM and SCML. The results will be useful for scholars of both fields in their attempts to enlarge the knowledge boundaries in these areas. From a practitioner’s viewpoint, this research may provide an integrative framework for global organizations to build a competitive advantage based on managing HC and its SCML strategically.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 44 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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