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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Timothy J. Galpin

A seven-step Strategy Execution Model provides a tested guide to agile implementation.

Abstract

Purpose

A seven-step Strategy Execution Model provides a tested guide to agile implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

Pragmatic actions, key deliverables and a case example for each of the seven steps in the model are presented.

Findings

Firms that focus more on strategic planning than implementation are often plagued with execution issues. Whereas, organizations that are able to execute their strategies as a well managed, integrated process have a much better chance of realizing the full potential of their plans.

Practical implications

Supporting the experience of numerous management teams, research indicates that poor execution often squanders the value companies anticipate from innovative, advantageous strategic initiatives. To minimize the likelihood of mismanagement, companies need a repeatable process that provides an integrated and actionable approach to effective strategy execution.

Originality/value

Senior executives and middle managers need a structured, coordinated system for managing strategy implementation. The author’s seven-step method has been tested in practice and refined. It emphasizes communication and agile adaptability.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Timothy J. Galpin

Al “Chainsaw” Dunlap's recent announcement of a 50% job cut at Sunbeam aside, “growth” has replaced “downsizing” as the dominant strategic focus throughout American…

Abstract

Al “Chainsaw” Dunlap's recent announcement of a 50% job cut at Sunbeam aside, “growth” has replaced “downsizing” as the dominant strategic focus throughout American business. Mergers and acquisitions, new market penetration, mass customization, enhanced customer service, strategic alliances, and the like are all in the sights of businesses large and small. But while activities focused on the cost side of the profit equation represent a relatively simple “strategy” to pursue—thanks to armies of consultants churning out graphs, charts, and tables recommending head cuts—growth strategies present management with an even greater challenge: how to make their strategies work.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

J. Lee Whittington and Timothy J. Galpin

Attracting and retaining a talented work force is a strategic imperative. Doing so requires organizations to create an overall context through a set of macro‐level

Abstract

Purpose

Attracting and retaining a talented work force is a strategic imperative. Doing so requires organizations to create an overall context through a set of macro‐level organizational practices we refer to as the HR value chain. However, this organizational context must be supplemented at the micro level through leader behavior, job characteristics, and challenging goals. An evidence‐based integrative model of organizational practices is developed that will lead to a high level of employee engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper addresses several key questions: Do engaged employees perform better than those that are not engaged? How should companies best organize their HR processes at a firm‐wide level to foster employee engagement? What should companies do at an employee level to foster engagement? What is the role of employee to manager trust in employee engagement? A review and summary of existing empirical literature from the areas of employee engagement, human resources, strategy, and leadership was assembled to answer these questions and provide an evidenced‐based set of prescriptions for practicing managers seeking to enhance employee engagement.

Findings

The evidence presented supports seven key engagement principles characterized by: an integrated HR value chain; full‐range leader behaviors incorporating contingent reward and transformational behaviors; job enrichment through variety, significance, and task identity; challenging and specific performance goals; in‐role job performance; extra‐role performance behaviors; and employee trust in their leader.

Originality/value

The content of the paper is useful to executives and managers in firms of various sizes and across industries by: presenting empirically‐based evidence that engaged employees perform better than those that are not engaged; providing pragmatic recommendations regarding how to establish firm‐wide human resources process that foster workforce engagement; providing practical recommendations regarding what companies should do at an employee level to foster engagement; explaining the role of employee to manager trust in employee engagement; providing a bridge across the often decried gap between academic research and the practice of management.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 September 2018

Robert M. Randall

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Larry Goodson

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 September 2018

Larry Goodson

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2020

Timothy Galpin

The purpose of this paper is to determine how and to what extent firms are using “environmental choice architecture” to “nudge” innovation across the organization. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine how and to what extent firms are using “environmental choice architecture” to “nudge” innovation across the organization. The Cultural Alignment Model was designed based on the concept that individual and collective workforce behaviors are formed by an organization’s environment. Although existing since the 1950s, behavioral theory has seen a recent resurgence of popularity in shaping culture. Described in the book Nudge, compelling research demonstrates that individual and collective behavior can be influenced through what is termed “environmental choice architecture.” The Oxford Innovation Insights Project was established to test the Cultural Alignment Model, by answering the question – How and to what extent are firms using “environmental choice architecture” to “nudge” innovation across the organization?

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 60 “C-Suite” executives, representing 15 different industries. Each executive was asked to respond to the same four items: to what extent do you agree or disagree with the statement – innovation is a strategic priority for our firm; on a scale of 1 (low innovation) to 10 (high innovation) please rate your firm’s organization-wide level of innovation; Which of the following processes does your firm use to encourage innovation across the organization? And for the processes that your firm uses, please provide examples of how each is designed to encourage innovation behaviors across your workforce.

Findings

Eighty-six percent of respondents identified innovation is a strategic priority for their firm, while just 8% of respondents rated their companies as having a “high” level of firm-wide innovation. The environmental choice architecture components most frequently used by firms to encourage innovation behaviors across the workforce are identified. A strong positive relationship was found between “high innovation” firms and the number of environmental choice architecture components they use to encourage innovation. Firms having a low level of innovation underperformed market peers, while firms rated as having a high level of firm-wide innovation outperformed the market benchmark.

Research limitations/implications

Repeat the current study to include more respondents and industries; rather than relying on self-ratings, determine a firm’s innovation rating through an external assessment, such as industry expert ratings of firms’ innovativeness; beyond frequency of utilization, assess the strength of innovation “nudge” each cultural lever provides; determine if a relationship exists between the market and financial performance of firms and the number of “cultural levers” they use to nudge innovation across the workforce; and compare the level of innovation between each industry by expanding the respondent pool to include more representatives from each industry.

Practical implications

Company culture is identified as one of the top obstacles for a firm’s innovation performance in a global survey of 1,500 executives. Moreover, the authors of the McKinsey Global Innovation Survey state, “The best companies [in the study] find ways to embed innovation into the fibers of their culture, from the core to the periphery”, but tellingly the authors do not identify how to go about creating that embeddedness. The Cultural Alignment Model presented provides management a pragmatic approach to embed innovation across their firm’s culture using elements of the organization’s choice architecture.

Originality/value

Behavioral theory has seen a recent resurgence of popularity in shaping culture. The Oxford Innovation Insights Project tests the Cultural Alignment Model, by answering the question – How and to what extent are firms using “environmental choice architecture” to “nudge” innovation across the organization?

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2018

Timothy Galpin

Mergers and acquisitions (M&As) have become the preferred growth strategy for many executives. However, simply “doing deals” is not enough to create a competitive…

Abstract

Purpose

Mergers and acquisitions (M&As) have become the preferred growth strategy for many executives. However, simply “doing deals” is not enough to create a competitive advantage for their companies. Only focusing on M&A as a financial transaction is too narrow of an approach, which is easily duplicated across firms. Using Woodward, Inc. as a case example, this article shows how using an actionable, end-to-end process model, and embedding integrated capabilities within the organization, across the entire process, managers can make M&A a core competence to provide a valuable, rare, and inimitable advantage for their firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods approach, combining action research with a narrative synthesis of empirical and practice literature was used to develop a comprehensive M&A process model - the Deal Flow Model - consisting of ten stages across three phases. The resource-based view, core competencies, and the VRIO framework provide a theoretical foundation for the model. An application of the Deal Flow Model using Woodward Inc. as a case example is also presented.

Findings

Only focusing on M&A as a financial transaction is too narrow of an approach, which is easily duplicated across firms. Instead, using an actionable, end-to-end process model, and embedding integrated capabilities within the organization across the entire M&A process provides a valuable, rare, and inimitable advantage for firms.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers will find the Deal Flow Model useful as a structure to examine the M&A process as a whole or to frame single-stage, single-discipline research in the broader context of the overall M&A process.

Practical implications

A practice-oriented Deal Flow Model, providing a cross-disciplinary, end-to-end view of the M&A process is presented. The model is designed to be actionable by managers, who can apply the process to build the M&A competence of their organization.

Originality/value

The Deal Flow Model is unique as it is designed to be actionable by managers, who can apply the process to build the M&A competence of their organization. Likewise, researchers will find the model useful as a structure to examine the M&A process as a whole or to frame single-stage, single-discipline research in the broader context of the overall M&A process.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2019

Tim Galpin

This paper offers an approach to deal with the value destruction caused when culturally incompatible organizations merge.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper offers an approach to deal with the value destruction caused when culturally incompatible organizations merge.

Design/methodology/approach

A field-tested Cultural Comparison and Integration Model is demonstrated. 10;

Findings

The model illustrates how managers can compare and integrate cultures of combining firms using “cultural levers”.

Practical implications

A case example of the model in practice is included.

Originality/value

The model has been tested in a large and medium size organizations in a variety of industries and nationalities.

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