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Article

David Heavens, Joanne Hodgekins, Rebecca Lower, Joanne Spauls, Benjamin Carroll, Brioney Gee, Timothy Clarke and Jonathan Wilson

There is an international drive to improve mental health services for young people. This study aims to investigate service user experience of a youth mental health service…

Abstract

Purpose

There is an international drive to improve mental health services for young people. This study aims to investigate service user experience of a youth mental health service in Norfolk, UK. In addition to suggesting improvements to this service, recommendations are made for the development of youth mental health services in general.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods approach was used. Quantitative data from satisfaction questionnaires were analysed using descriptive statistics and compared between two time points. A semi-structured interview was used to generate qualitative data. Thematic analysis was used to identify themes in the interview transcripts and triangulation was used to synthesise quantitative and qualitative data.

Findings

Service users appeared satisfied with the service. Significant improvements in satisfaction were found between two time points. Qualitative analysis identified three main themes that were important to service users, including support, information and personhood.

Practical implications

Recommendations for the development of youth mental health services are provided. Although these are based on findings from the Norfolk youth service, they are likely to apply to other mental health services for young people.

Originality/value

Mental health care for young people requires significant improvement. The Norfolk youth service is one of the first services of its kind in the UK. The findings from this study might be helpful to consider in the development of youth mental health services across the world.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article

Tim Clarke and Tonia Mihill

Improving and transforming children and young people’s (CYP) mental health (MH) services is increasing in importance. Such systems, however, are often delivered across…

Abstract

Purpose

Improving and transforming children and young people’s (CYP) mental health (MH) services is increasing in importance. Such systems, however, are often delivered across providers and commissioned in different ways which can lead to fragmentation and complexity, ultimately impacting negatively on how young people access services. With increased demand, this means that services are more likely to operate in silos when indeed they should be better integrated. Developing systemic interventions for service leaders and commissioners may support improved integration. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Systemic issues across a CYP MH system were assessed and formulated. As a result, using systemic theory, appreciative inquiry and organisational change theories, a “systemic conversation” intervention was developed and delivered to senior leaders and commissioners of this system. This intervention comprised three workshop style sessions with numerous tasks.

Findings

Qualitative feedback and scores in the improvement of important elements that the conversations targeted were collected and examined descriptively. Participants rated their perceived improvement in relationships, transparency, integration, helpfulness and shared vision for future development.

Practical implications

In transforming CYP MH services, this paper considers how the authors can intervene across organisations representing the system to further integrate and improve care for those accessing services.

Originality/value

The intervention described is an original way of intervening with provider representatives from across the system. The paper provides a blueprint of how this might be adopted by others.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article

Rebecca Collins, Caitlin Notley, Tim Clarke, Jon Wilson and David Fowler

Whilst there are pockets of excellence in the provision of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), many services fail to meet young people’s needs…

Abstract

Purpose

Whilst there are pockets of excellence in the provision of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), many services fail to meet young people’s needs. Considering this, the purpose of this paper is to ascertain perceptions of CAMHS provision in a rural county of the UK to inform re-design of youth mental health services.

Design/methodology/approach

The study comprised of two phases: phase one involved analysis of questionnaire data of youth views of CAMHS. Phase two involved analysis of the “Have Your Say” event data which explored perceptions of CAMHS and future service re-design. Data were thematically analysed.

Findings

Knowledge of the existence and purpose of CAMHS was variable. Participants wanted accessible information about services, rights, confidentiality and for this to be provided in multiple media. Young people wanted staff who were easy to talk to, genuine, understanding and who valued their insights. Participants wanted to be offered choice about appointments, location and timing. An ideal mental health service was described as a “one-stop-shop” of co-locality and multi-agency collaboration. Young people clearly expressed a desire to influence the design and delivery of the radical service re-design and to be embedded in its development.

Practical implications

The results highlighted multiple problems with CAMHS provision and provided a clear justification for the re-design of services.

Originality/value

This was a novel approach demonstrating the importance, utility and power of effective participatory practices for informing the re-design of services.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Abstract

Details

Experiencing Persian Heritage
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-813-8

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Abstract

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Tourism Research Frontiers: Beyond the Boundaries of Knowledge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-993-5

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine whether a single session of a motivational interview (MI) reduces smoking relapse amongst people released from smoke-free prisons.

Design/methodology/approach

This study sought to recruit 824 ex-smokers from 2 smoke-free prisons in the Northern Territory, Australia. Participants were randomised to receive either one session (45–60 min) face-to-face MI intervention 4–6 weeks prior to release or usual care (UC) without smoking advice. The primary outcome was continuous smoking abstinence verified by exhaled carbon monoxide test (<5 ppm) at three months post-release. Secondary outcomes included seven-day point-prevalence, time to the first cigarette and the daily number of cigarettes smoked after release.

Findings

From April 2017 to March 2018, a total of 557 participants were randomised to receive the MI (n = 266) or UC (n = 291), with 75% and 77% being followed up, respectively. There was no significant between-group difference in continuous abstinence (MI 8.6% vs UC 7.4%, risk ratio = 1.16, 95%CI 0.67∼2.03). Of all participants, 66.9% relapsed on the day of release and 90.2% relapsed within three months. On average, participants in the MI group smoked one less cigarette daily than those in the UC within the three months after release (p < 0.01).

Research limitations/implications

A single-session of MI is insufficient to reduce relapse after release from a smoke-free prison. However, prison release remains an appealing time window to build on the public health benefit of smoke-free prisons. Further research is needed to develop both pre- and post-release interventions that provide continuity of care for relapse prevention.

Originality/value

This study is the first Australian randomised controlled trial to evaluate a pre-release MI intervention on smoking relapse prevention amongst people released from smoke-free prisons.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article

Timothy Oluwafemi Ayodele, Timothy Tunde Oladokun and Kahilu Kajimo-Shakantu

The global shift in the traditional skills required of real estate graduates has led to an increased demand for employees who have the required skills and competencies…

Abstract

Purpose

The global shift in the traditional skills required of real estate graduates has led to an increased demand for employees who have the required skills and competencies. The purpose of this study is to evaluate employment considerations of real estate firms and analyse employers’ skill expectations and the observed skills possessed by the graduate employees. This study also analysed the self-assessed soft skill levels of the graduate employees, thereby establishing the skill gap.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were sought from real estate employers in the two dominant real estate markets of Nigeria: Lagos and Abuja, and real estate graduate employees who have had a minimum of six months working experience in real estate firms. Data collected were analysed using statistical techniques such as frequency, percentages, mean, correlation, multivariate analysis of variance, paired-samples t-test and independent samples t-test.

Findings

The findings of this study revealed that employers’ soft skills expectations were high with skills such as responsibility, administrative, listening, communication, business negotiation and work ethics. Based on employers' observed skills, there were significant skill gaps with respect to soft skills such as responsibility, business negotiation, logical thinking, marketing and dispute resolution. An analysis of the core skills reveals employers' preference for technical competencies in valuation, agency, property management, marketing, report writing and landlord and tenant laws. However, graduate employees possessed significant skill gaps with regards to technical skills such as valuation, property investment analysis, feasibility and viability appraisal, market research methods and facility management.

Practical implications

An understanding of the skill gaps will provide useful feedback to professional bodies, regulatory boards, institutions of higher learning, faculty members and other stakeholders regarding deficient skill areas, especially for curriculum review, development and training in the real estate sector.

Originality/value

There is a paucity of information about employers' skill preferences and the skill gaps in the real estate sector.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Book part

Ercil T. A. Charles and Donna Chambers

Research on the link between tourism and politics still remains relatively underdeveloped and more so when one considers the link between this phenomenon and the study of…

Abstract

Research on the link between tourism and politics still remains relatively underdeveloped and more so when one considers the link between this phenomenon and the study of elections or psephology. This is despite the importance of elections to the democratic process and to considerations of the distribution of scarce resources particularly in countries heavily dependent on tourism. This chapter seeks to address this lacuna in scholarship through a theoretical explication of the nature of political issues and voter response. Applied to the development of a possible research agenda, this would aid in exploring the salience of tourism within electoral agendas from a relational perspective.

Details

Tourism Research Frontiers: Beyond the Boundaries of Knowledge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-993-5

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Article

Olanrewaju Timothy Dada, Hafeez Idowu Agbabiaka, Adewumi Israel Badiora, Bashir Olufemi Odufuwa and Deborah Bunmi Ojo

Tourism has become a sustainable and viable tool in place making or community revitalization process. Residents’ perceptions of tourism impacts are critical to the…

Abstract

Purpose

Tourism has become a sustainable and viable tool in place making or community revitalization process. Residents’ perceptions of tourism impacts are critical to the sustainability of the tourism industry. This study follows a quantitative research approach to examine how variation in patronage pattern impact its host community using Olumo Rock in Abeokuta, Nigeria, as a case study.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data from 324 residents are analysed using mean scores, chi-square and one-way ANOVA analysis. Secondary data such as the number of monthly patronage and precipitation and temperature were also analysed.

Findings

The findings revealed that the majority of residents do not patronize the tourism destination and that patronage patterns were seasonal and varied within and between seasons in Olumo. The perception of the residents living adjacent to the tourism destination established that they experienced positive and sometimes negative regardless of the season of the year or the proximity residential neighbourhood to tourism destination.

Originality/value

The findings of this study are sufficiently valuable to merit further investigation. It also provides an important spatial–temporal platform for future tourism impacts variability research in Nigeria and other countries in the tropic region. Furthermore, it is apparent from this study that temporal analyses in a given tourism destination may not translate effectively into another. In this respect, tourism managers in Olumo Rock should be aware of fluctuation in patronage pattern so as to introduction other attraction components at the right season.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Book part

Amy A. Ross

Purpose: As biomedicine grants technology and quantification privileged roles in our cultural constructions of health, media and technology play an increasingly important

Abstract

Purpose: As biomedicine grants technology and quantification privileged roles in our cultural constructions of health, media and technology play an increasingly important role in mediating our everyday experiences of our bodies and may contribute to the reproduction of gendered norms.

Design: This study draws from a broad variety of disciplines to contextualize and interpret contemporary trends in self-quantification, focusing on metrics for health and fitness. I will also draw from psychology and feminist scholarship on objectification and body-surveillance.

Findings: I interpret body-tracking tools as biomedical technologies of self-surveillance that facilitate and encourage control of human bodies, while solidifying demands for standardization around neoliberal values of enhancement and optimization. I also argue that body-tracking devices reinforce and normalize the scrutiny of human bodies in ways that may reproduce and advance longstanding gender disparities in detriment of women.

Implications: A responsible conceptualization, design, implementation, and usage of health-tracking technologies requires us to recognize and better understand how technologies with widely touted benefits also have the potential to reinforce and extend inequalities, alter subjective experiences and produce damaging outcomes, especially among certain groups. I conclude by proposing some alternatives for devising technologies or encouraging practices that are sensitive to these differences and acknowledge the validity of alternative values.

Details

eHealth: Current Evidence, Promises, Perils and Future Directions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-322-5

Keywords

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