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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Haniya Sarfraz

A common conception is that transformational, transactional, and other types of leaders implement similar time management skills; however, this paper aims to state that…

3493

Abstract

Purpose

A common conception is that transformational, transactional, and other types of leaders implement similar time management skills; however, this paper aims to state that this is not true to a very large extent.

Design/methodology/approach

The characteristics of transactional, transformational, and other leadership styles are defined, while the popular and latest time management principles are incorporated with this description. There are eight time management categories, and this paper connects the respective categories to nine leadership styles based on each style’s nature. Cross-cultural leadership’s approach to time management is used to highlight and provide simplification for this process. Together, this showcases the importance and need to further investigate the relationship between leadership style, time management, and time conception.

Findings

This time management differentiation between transformational, transactional, and other leaders needs to be acknowledged, as this will deliver insight about how leaders can advance their leadership style. This differentiation brings greater understanding of the link between leadership and time management thus giving leaders deeper awareness on how they form their groundbreaking strategies and, with the cross-cultural leadership’s time management approach, mold their personal traits and experiences in coordination with this link.

Originality/value

This review states and highlights the difference in time management skills between nine leadership styles. The cross-cultural leadership approach helps identify three time and behavioral conceptions and the countries to which these conceptions are prominent in. The time conceptions assist leaders in understanding why they portray certain time management behaviors based on their cultural background, thus providing simplification in applying the time management skills for their leadership style.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1992

Kees Blase

Describes new management styles and organizational structuresdeveloped by school‐leaders in response to the challenges of the 1990s.Experiments in The Netherlands show…

Abstract

Describes new management styles and organizational structures developed by school‐leaders in response to the challenges of the 1990s. Experiments in The Netherlands show many advantages in shared leadership, management‐teams and part‐time leadership. Also describes disadvantages and necessary conditions and procedures for implementing these new organizational structures.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 7 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Yu Guoqing and Zhu Yongxin

With business and institution managers as the research subjects, 170 questionnaires were collected through mail and on‐the‐spot investigation. The results were: Forming…

3363

Abstract

With business and institution managers as the research subjects, 170 questionnaires were collected through mail and on‐the‐spot investigation. The results were: Forming time management effectiveness scale (TMES) including 11 inner factors; female manager is lower than male in total time management effectiveness; the total amount of male manager’s working time per week adds up to 52.489 hours and female manager’s 46.438 hours. Differences are seen in the amount and structure of working time as well as non‐working time. Finally, there is no significant difference between male and female managers in the serious degree of each wasting time factor but difference in sequence. The results here can serve as a reference for further studying and developing time management theory, for probing into the gender differences in time management, and will improve managers’ management practice.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

The Nature of Business Policy Business policy — or general management — is concerned with the following six major functions:

1491

Abstract

The Nature of Business Policy Business policy — or general management — is concerned with the following six major functions:

Details

Management Decision, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1989

James Margol and Brian H. Kleiner

Executives must develop skills to manage management time as well asconventional time. Methods which improve skills include understandingtime‐space structures, using…

2897

Abstract

Executives must develop skills to manage management time as well as conventional time. Methods which improve skills include understanding time‐space structures, using methods proposed by Peter F. Drucker, and managing one′s immediate management molecule as proposed by William Oncken. Unconventional time management techniques used by Harold Geneen, Ex‐CEO of International Telephone and Telegraph are also explored.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2018

Julien Pollack, Jane Helm and Daniel Adler

The Iron Triangle, also called the Triple Constraint, is a central concept to project management research and practice, representing the relationship between key…

10213

Abstract

Purpose

The Iron Triangle, also called the Triple Constraint, is a central concept to project management research and practice, representing the relationship between key performance criteria. However, there is disagreement about which criteria should be represented on the vertices of this triangle. The purpose of this paper is to explore which concepts are part of the Iron Triangle, and how these concepts have changed over time.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores 45 years of project management research, drawing on a database of 109,804 records from 1970 to 2015. Three corpora were constructed, representing the project management and Time, Cost, and Quality Management literature. Time and Cost are consistently identified as part of the Iron Triangle. However, the status of quality is contested. Key concepts in the project management literature were explored using scientometric research techniques, to understand the relationship between these concepts.

Findings

Significant links were found between Time, Cost, and Quality, verifying these concepts as the vertices on the Iron Triangle. These links were significantly stronger than links to alternatives, such as Scope, Performance, or Requirements. Other concepts that are core to the Iron Triangle were also identified, and how these have changed over time.

Originality/value

This research develops the understanding of a key project management concept by clarifying which concepts are part of the Iron Triangle, based on evidence of how the concept is used in research. This paper also reveals the context in which this concept is used, and how this has changed over the last 45 years.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

R. Ray Gehani

For corporations competing in a global marketplace, time‐basedmanagement of their technology is becoming a significant resource.However, the concept of time in management

2742

Abstract

For corporations competing in a global marketplace, time‐based management of their technology is becoming a significant resource. However, the concept of time in management of technology‐driven industrial organizations is not new. Classical management theorists like Frederick Taylor and others used time‐based management in “scientific” management of operations or for planning, organizing, scheduling, and controlling. However, due to opening of international barriers, fast changing technologies, and rapidly shrinking product life cycles, time‐based management is acquiring an increasing significance in its tactical and strategic roles. Develops a comprehensive taxonomy of time‐based management based on its three dimensions: form, origin and application. Discusses trade‐offs and linking of time‐based management with other strategic criteria, such as quality, performance, and delivery. Outlines six specific ideas for implementation of agility‐based strategy. Discusses some managerial implications for optimal utilization of time‐based management.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Georgia Kouali and Petros Pashiardis

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a piece of research concerning the time management of Cypriot primary school principals. Time management refers to…

1275

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a piece of research concerning the time management of Cypriot primary school principals. Time management refers to the interrelation of five independent variables: the various tasks principals perform, their frequency, the degree of accomplishment of those tasks, the use of time management techniques and time management style (from monochronic to polychronic).

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative methods were used (questionnaire) together with qualitative methods (observation, interviews, collection of artifacts), in order to obtain richer, deeper data and view multiple angles of the same phenomenon.

Findings

The results of cluster analysis indicated three different time management profiles/types of principals: The Centralized Monochrons, the Procrastinative Managers and the Decentralized Polychrons. One basic conclusion is that the principals who adopt the practices of the Decentralized Polychrons manage better their time.

Practical implications

The three time management profiles of principals are described, analysed, and discussed in order to reach conclusions about the selection, training, and placement of school principals. Through the description of the everyday practice of Cypriot principals useful information concerning school leadership and management are also provided. Finally, the conclusions of this research may prove useful for principals, because they are provided with the opportunity to rethink and evaluate their own time management and effectiveness of their daily practices.

Originality/value

The creation and description of the three time management profiles is the main contribution of this piece of research, since there are not any time management types-profiles registered in the bibliography, which were produced with the use of scientific instruments and procedures.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

Brigitte J.C. Claessens, Wendelien van Eerde, Christel G. Rutte and Robert A. Roe

The purpose of this article is to provide an overview for those interested in the current state‐of‐the‐art in time management research.

40503

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide an overview for those interested in the current state‐of‐the‐art in time management research.

Design/methodology/approach

This review includes 32 empirical studies on time management conducted between 1982 and 2004.

Findings

The review demonstrates that time management behaviours relate positively to perceived control of time, job satisfaction, and health, and negatively to stress. The relationship with work and academic performance is not clear. Time management training seems to enhance time management skills, but this does not automatically transfer to better performance.

Research limitations/implications

The reviewed research displays several limitations. First, time management has been defined and operationalised in a variety of ways. Some instruments were not reliable or valid, which could account for unstable findings. Second, many of the studies were based on cross‐sectional surveys and used self‐reports only. Third, very little attention was given to job and organizational factors. There is a need for more rigorous research into the mechanisms of time management and the factors that contribute to its effectiveness. The ways in which stable time management behaviours can be established also deserves further investigation.

Practical implications

This review makes clear which effects may be expected of time management, which aspects may be most useful for which individuals, and which work characteristics would enhance or hinder positive effects. Its outcomes may help to develop more effective time management practices.

Originality/value

This review is the first to offer an overview of empirical research on time management. Both practice and scientific research may benefit from the description of previous attempts to measure and test the popular notions of time management.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 October 2021

Matt Kaufman, Ella Mae Matsumura and Urban Wemmerlöv

This study examines challenges to the retrospective financial evaluation of continuous improvement (CI) activities. Through a review of the literature and active…

Abstract

This study examines challenges to the retrospective financial evaluation of continuous improvement (CI) activities. Through a review of the literature and active engagement with CI implementations, we identify several issues that may lead to divergence between operational and financial assessments. Out of this conflict emerges a set of concepts that we find important − the delineation of soft versus hard capacity benefits, the distinction between capacity used and capacity paid for, and the data gaps that relate to these benefits – and recognize operational improvement and financial improvement as distinct, yet interrelated, theoretical constructs. This study helps explain a series of persistent gaps in the management accounting literature: Conflict between operations and accounting managers, the divergent perspectives of Johnson and Kaplan after their publication of Relevance Lost (Johnson & Kaplan, 1987), and the need for both operational control (including detailed capacity control) and accounting control in CI firms. Instead of one control system being at odds with the other, or co-existing despite each other, each of these systems support a different component of the financial improvement process. Operational control systems in CI firms emphasize non-financial information and social and behavioral controls that empower decision-making by employees, while accounting control systems seek to motivate and translate operational gains into financial gains. Soft and hard benefits linked to capacity play an integral role in understanding the difference in focus of each control system, while data limitations help to explain why these systems remain loosely coupled in practice (or absent, as seems to be the case with detailed Capacity Management Systems).

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