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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Mohamed A. Youssef

Examines the impact of the intensity level of design formanufacturability (DFM) on the time‐to‐market. Hypothesizes thatcompanies which use the DFM technology…

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907

Abstract

Examines the impact of the intensity level of design for manufacturability (DFM) on the time‐to‐market. Hypothesizes that companies which use the DFM technology strategically are more likely than their counterparts to exhibit a shorter time‐to‐market, introduce new products and processes more often, and are more responsive to their customers needs. An index for measuring the intensity level of DFM is developed. The analysis was based on data collected from 165 manufacturing firms in three industry groups in US – industrial machinery equipment, electronic and electric machinery equipment, and transportation equipment. Suggests that differences in time‐to‐market among firms with different intensity level of DFM do exist. Shows the existence of moderate association between DFM and time‐to‐market, and between DFM and introducing new products and new processes.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Vera Blazevic, Annouk Lievens and Evelien Klein

Mobile service innovations are crucial for the long‐term success of companies operating in turbulent and uncertain environments. These innovations need to be introduced at…

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2472

Abstract

Mobile service innovations are crucial for the long‐term success of companies operating in turbulent and uncertain environments. These innovations need to be introduced at a rapid pace while at the same time companies have to absorb market information during the new mobile service development. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to construct a conceptual framework on the critical antecedents of project learning and time‐to‐market during new mobile service development. An extensive case study research involving four innovation projects was performed in a leading Dutch telecommunications company. With respect to project learning, our research findings indicate the crucial influence of a flexible decision architecture, project team memory, a high information awareness and a good fit between information requirements and capabilities. Both innovative and coordinative communication are required throughout the service innovation process. With regard to time‐to‐market, our research results point to the essential impact of project complexity, top management support, information power of suppliers and technological synergy. Finally, a medium level of project learning is the ideal condition for a fast time‐to‐market during mobile service innovation.

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International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Andre Ferrarese and Marly Monteiro de Carvalho

– The purpose of this paper is to provide a management tool to maximise the effective time-to-market of a portfolio given the competitive monitoring activities.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a management tool to maximise the effective time-to-market of a portfolio given the competitive monitoring activities.

Design/methodology/approach

From the constant monitoring of competition and market needs, it is proposed to define a time-to-need, time when the market may consume the product under development and competitor will not provide a solution before. This time-to-need is proposed to be defined by an expert committee in a periodical meeting of the portfolio. Once it is identified the time-to-need and the time-to-market (project management), it is possible to manage resources in order to maximise the portfolio outputs.

Findings

The application of the mentioned approach in an automotive industry showed improvements on number of launched new products per year (double) and on number of patented product launched (four times more).

Research limitations/implications

This approach applies on projects of medium to long term (more than two years) because the resource management can consume set up time. The presented results in this work were based in a single case, which can limit the expected results of the application of this methodology.

Practical implications

This approach enables a constant alignment among experts and a better deployment of resources.

Originality/value

This work provides a practical tool to promote better resource allocation in a portfolio. It can also be an enabler of innovation projects once it finds resources potential to fund the more front end work.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Ashish Kumar, Ravi Shankar and Kirankumar S. Momaya

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate, from a Myanmar mobile operator’s point of view, the trade-off between trying to trying to get to untapped towns and villages…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate, from a Myanmar mobile operator’s point of view, the trade-off between trying to trying to get to untapped towns and villages faster than competition (“time-to-market” strategy) and cooperating with competition through network sharing to reduce costs (“coopetition” strategy).

Design/methodology/approach

The system dynamics (SD) model shows the business results of a Myanmar mobile operator under two different scenarios, one in which the focus is on time-to-market, and the other in which the focus is on coopetition.

Findings

An operator motivated by time-to-market advantage expects better margins by capturing market share ahead of competition. However, when every operator follows this individual agenda, its time-to-market benefit depends on whether it is actually faster than competition. In contrast, coopetition eliminates costs by design and provides assured margin improvements.

Practical implications

The paper establishes that coopetition has a clear economic rationale. Adopting coopetition improves the business case of the mobile operator and helps it to contribute to the socio-economic development of Myanmar.

Originality/value

The paper applies SD modelling, which is under-represented in marketing, to a study on coopetition in the mobile industry, in the context of Myanmar, a market which is rarely studied in marketing research.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

P. Baguley, T. Page, V. Koliza and P. Maropoulos

Time to market is the essential aim of any new product introduction process. Performance measures are simple quantities that indicate the state of manufacturing…

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1405

Abstract

Purpose

Time to market is the essential aim of any new product introduction process. Performance measures are simple quantities that indicate the state of manufacturing organisations and are used as the basis of decision‐making at this crucial early stage of the process. Fuzzy set theory is a method for using qualitative data and subjective opinion. Fuzzy sets have been used extensively in manufacturing for applications including control, decision‐making, and estimation. Type‐2 fuzzy sets are a novel extension of type‐1 fuzzy sets. Aims to examine this subject.

Design/methodology/approach

This research explores the increased use of type‐2 fuzzy sets in manufacturing. In particular, type‐2 fuzzy sets are used to model “the words that mean different things to different people”.

Findings

A model that can leverage design process knowledge and predict time to market from performance measures is a potentially valuable tool for decision making and continuous improvement. A number of data sources, such as process maps, from previous research into time to market in a high technology products company, are used to structure and build a type‐2 fuzzy logic model for the prediction of time to market.

Originality/value

This paper presents a demonstration of how the type‐2 fuzzy logic model works and provides directions for further research into the design process for time to market.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Massimo Garbuio and Dan Lovallo

Whether an organization’s political behaviour is positively related to its performance has been a long-standing question. Most studies elaborating on this issue, although…

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1152

Abstract

Purpose

Whether an organization’s political behaviour is positively related to its performance has been a long-standing question. Most studies elaborating on this issue, although rich in detail, primarily have been limited to case studies, apart from a niche set of studies in international business. This study aims to explore this question through a survey study of managers and executives from around the world, across a range of industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study explores the link between politics, the ability of a firm to speedily reach the market and its growth rate through a study of 382 executives from across the world. It also investigates alternative explanations of slow speed to market due to power centralization, decision-making layers and conflict.

Findings

The results show that politics – the observable but often covert actions through which executives influence internal decisions – has a direct negative effect on a firm’s ability to reach the market first and on its growth rate. That is, not only is politics time-consuming but it may also have a detrimental impact on the selection of the best growth opportunities.

Originality/value

Politics does have a negative impact on growth; it slows down a firm’s growth and its ability to reach the market. This study eliminates possible alternative explanations of a slow pace to market: slower companies are not so because they have too many decision-making layers but because they use consultative processes in resource-allocation decisions, or because of conflict.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Barry Brooks and Norman Schofield

Contends that, while the importance of time to product developmentprocesses has been underscored by many commentators, it is not until“time” is divided into component…

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2760

Abstract

Contends that, while the importance of time to product development processes has been underscored by many commentators, it is not until “time” is divided into component elements that the scope for improvement becomes manifest. Since time equals money, effective time management is of self‐evident importance. Outlines areas of management focus, through which time is a common thread. Analyses the constituents of time‐to‐market in terms of their capacity to measure temporal processes and reduce their costs. Proposes a structure to support the changes necessary for such reductions, and delineates the benefits accruing from reduced time‐to‐market.

Details

World Class Design to Manufacture, vol. 2 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-3074

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Anant Deshpande

The purpose of the paper is to empirically investigate the relationships between advanced manufacturing technology (AMT), absorptive capacity, mass customization (MC…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to empirically investigate the relationships between advanced manufacturing technology (AMT), absorptive capacity, mass customization (MC) capability, competitive advantage, and organizational performance measures.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a literature review, a theoretical framework is derived. Structural equation modeling was chosen for the empirical analysis based on the focus of the research. Data collection was conducted from 232 Indian manufacturing managers.

Findings

The findings indicate that absorptive capacity has a positive impact on MC capability. Also, MC capability mediated the relationship between AMT and the financial and market performance. Furthermore, AMT positively impacted MC capability, and MC capability positively impacted both time to market and financial and market performance. AMT was not found to have a significant impact on financial and market performance.

Originality/value

The current study is meaningful and unique in that no study has investigated the linkages between AMT, absorptive capacity, MC capability and organization performance and competitive advantage measures in a unified context. Such investigations are important because the results will encourage managers to invest in developing these mechanisms, which in turn will influence firm’s ability to implement MC practices and yield benefits such as improved performance and competitive advantage.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Kulwant S. Pawar, Unny Menon and Johann C.K.H. Riedel

Over the last two decades, Japanese products have challenged Westernones, not only in terms of cost but also on quality, reliability anddelivery. This has meant that…

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1923

Abstract

Over the last two decades, Japanese products have challenged Western ones, not only in terms of cost but also on quality, reliability and delivery. This has meant that meeting customer needs on time has now entered the competitive equation. Hence, in the 1990s, time to market (TTM) has become a focal point in achieving competitive advantage in the marketplace. Presents an overview of TTM and of how to do it. Considers the costs and benefits of TTM, and uses two case studies to compare and contrast the effect of adopting TTM and ignoring it. Looks at the key factors of: tools and techniques; technology; team management and logistics, with practical examples of the main points in achieving TTM successfully.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Paul Hong, Abraham Y. Nahm and William J. Doll

Product development is recognized as cross‐functional teamwork that has become important in the fast‐paced, globally competitive environment. Despite an extant body of…

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3479

Abstract

Product development is recognized as cross‐functional teamwork that has become important in the fast‐paced, globally competitive environment. Despite an extant body of knowledge on the importance of fuzzy front‐end planning and functions of goals in the management literature, the impact of uncertain project environment and goal setting mechanisms in front‐end planning is not fully understood. Product development literature presents numerous case studies or conceptual papers that emphasize the importance of upfront planning and a need for team building; however, large‐scale empirical studies are rare. This paper presents a model linking uncertain project environment, project target clarity, teamwork and its outcome measures (i.e. a product's value to customer and time to market). The data were analyzed from 205 product development projects of firms from the USA and Canada. Valid and reliable instruments were developed to assess the nature and impact of inter‐relationships of these variables. Results from structural model tests indicate that uncertain project environment influences the nature of project targets which in turn affects the level of teamwork. Teamwork is an important process outcome for enhancing value to customer and time to market. Management implications are discussed as well.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 24 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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