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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Jakob Wirth, Christian Maier, Sven Laumer and Tim Weitzel

“Smart devices think you're “too lazy” to opt out of privacy defaults” was the headline of a recent news report indicating that individuals might be too lazy to stop…

Abstract

Purpose

“Smart devices think you're “too lazy” to opt out of privacy defaults” was the headline of a recent news report indicating that individuals might be too lazy to stop disclosing their private information and therefore to protect their information privacy. In current privacy research, privacy concerns and self-disclosure are central constructs regarding protecting privacy. One might assume that being concerned about protecting privacy would lead individuals to disclose less personal information. However, past research has shown that individuals continue to disclose personal information despite high privacy concerns, which is commonly referred to as the privacy paradox. This study introduces laziness as a personality trait in the privacy context, asking to what degree individual laziness influences privacy issues.

Design/methodology/approach

After conceptualizing, defining and operationalizing laziness, the authors analyzed information collected in a longitudinal empirical study and evaluated the results through structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings show that the privacy paradox holds true, yet the level of laziness influences it. In particular, the privacy paradox applies to very lazy individuals but not to less lazy individuals.

Research limitations/implications

With these results one can better explain the privacy paradox and self-disclosure behavior.

Practical implications

The state might want to introduce laws that not only bring organizations to handle information in a private manner but also make it as easy as possible for individuals to protect their privacy.

Originality/value

Based on a literature review, a clear research gap has been identified, filled by this research study.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Jens Mattke, Christian Maier, Tim Weitzel and Jason Bennett Thatcher

Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) is a promising, powerful method that is increasingly used for IS research. However, the Information Systems (IS) discipline still…

Abstract

Purpose

Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) is a promising, powerful method that is increasingly used for IS research. However, the Information Systems (IS) discipline still lacks a shared understanding of how to conduct and report QCA. This paper introduces the fundamental concepts of QCA, summarizes the status quo, and derives recommendations for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive literature review in major IS outlets summarizes how and why QCA has been used in the IS discipline, critically evaluates the status quo, and derives recommendations for future QCA studies.

Findings

The literature review reveals 32 empirical research articles in major IS journals that have used the QCA method. Articles applied QCA to a broad range of research topics at the individual and organizational levels, mainly as a standalone analysis for theory development, elaboration and testing. The authors also provide evidence that most published IS research articles do not take full advantage of the potential QCA, such as analyzing necessary causal conditions or testing the robustness of QCA results. The authors provide seven actionable recommendations for future IS research using QCA.

Originality/value

The literature review assesses the status quo of QCA’s application in the IS discipline and provides specific recommendations on how IS researchers can leverage the full potential of QCA.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Jens Mattke, Christian Maier, Lea Reis and Tim Weitzel

Individuals only click on a very small fraction of the in-app advertisements (ads) they are exposed to. Despite this fact, organizations spend generously placing in-app…

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals only click on a very small fraction of the in-app advertisements (ads) they are exposed to. Despite this fact, organizations spend generously placing in-app ads without theoretical knowledge of how the structure and the semantics of in-app ads influence individuals’ clicking behavior. This study aims to identify how the processing of structural and semantic factors leads to clicking behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the limited capacity theory, this paper proposes that the sequential processing of structural and semantic factors leads to clicking behavior. To mirror the sequential process, this paper applies a process-oriented configurational approach and performs a two-step qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) using 262 incidents of exposure to in-app ads.

Findings

The results support the proposed sequential processing and show that neither structural nor semantic factors alone lead to clicking behavior. This paper reveals four different paths of sequential processing of in-app ads that lead to clicking behavior. The results show that individuals click on non-animated in-app ads even though these are perceived as irritating or privacy-concerning. When the in-app ads are animated, individuals do only click on them when these are not irritating, privacy-concerning and personalized.

Research limitations/implications

Organizations can use these findings to improve their in-app ads and generate more clicks. This study recommends that organizations place in-app ads in a prominent location, design them similar to the design of the app and use bright colors. The advertising message needs to have new and relevant information in a credible and entertaining way. Depending on the degree of personalization, organizations should use different sizes of the in-app ad and only use animation if it is unlikely that the in-app ad caused irritation or privacy concerns.

Practical implications

Organizations can use these findings to improve their in-app ads and generate more clicks. This paper recommends that organizations place in-app ads in a prominent location, design them similar to the design of the app and with bright colors. The advertising message needs to have new and relevant information in a credible and entertaining way. Depending on the degree of personalization, organizations should use different sizes of the in-app ad and only use animation if it is unlikely that the in-app ad caused irritation or privacy concerns.

Originality/value

From the in-app ad perspective, this study is the first to theoretically develop and empirically show the sequential processing of structural and semantic factors of in-app ads. From the methodological perspective, this study applies an advanced configurational two-step QCA approach, which is capable of analyzing sequential processes and is new to marketing research.

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Björn Münstermann, Andreas Eckhardt and Tim Weitzel

The purpose of this paper is to show if business process standardization (BPS) has an impact on business process performance and should be considered as both a valid…

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11661

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show if business process standardization (BPS) has an impact on business process performance and should be considered as both a valid business process management (BPM) measure and a regular driver of process success.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical analysis based on data from 156 firms is used to evaluate the hypothesis that process standardization positively impacts business process time, cost, and quality.

Findings

First, the paper proposes a model and empirical operationalization to analyze the impact of process standardization on process performance. Second, empirical analysis shows that BPS has a decisive impact on process performance (R2=61.9 percent). Precisely, there is a significant impact on process time, cost, and most notably on quality. The results indicate that the impact is strongest in services firms and varies subject to a firm's strategy type.

Practical implications

The results suggest that BPS should regularly be considered a prime action item and major tool in a firm's BPM toolbox.

Originality/value

The paper is among the first to empirically show the vital impact of process standardization on performance. For academics and practitioners interested in BPM and the value impact of processes, the results suggest adding process standardization as a regular argument into research on and management of business processes.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2007

Heinz‐Theo Wagner and Tim Weitzel

The goal of this paper is to identify core IT value drivers in firms and to model them as an IT production function to help disclose and measure the IT value creation…

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1112

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this paper is to identify core IT value drivers in firms and to model them as an IT production function to help disclose and measure the IT value creation process and to guide managers in seeking adequate ways of employing the IT resource.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a critical review of the literature on the resource‐based view, an IT value framework based on the constructs IT capability, resource, and routine is developed and then formalized as an IT production function.

Findings

Organizational routines are decisive for turning firm resources into an IT capability and in turn into better business process performance. Shows how the IT value creation process in general and routines in particular can be measured and formalized.

Practical implications

As the interaction between IT and business units is crucial for IT value generation, organizational routines provide for important knowledge flows that turn firm resources into value generating capabilities. Proposes a concrete method to measure and evaluate these routines and thereby contribute to making the IT resource controllable.

Originality/value

The main contribution is the identification and analytical formalization of the role of routines for IT value creation. Shows how insights from the resource‐based view, microeconomic theory (Cobb‐Douglas/CES production function), and Granovetter's strength of ties argument can be used to describe, measure, and guide IT value creation and to develop an IT production function.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Andreas Eckhardt, Sven Laumer, Christian Maier and Tim Weitzel

There is only scarce research about the transformation of e-HRM in general, and of the e-recruiting function in particular. Further, there is not much known of the…

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4890

Abstract

Purpose

There is only scarce research about the transformation of e-HRM in general, and of the e-recruiting function in particular. Further, there is not much known of the transformational implications for the related people, process, and information technology (IT). The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

To analyze the transformation of e-recruiting caused by external influences outside of the organization, the authors report the results of an eight-year case with a media corporation in order to derive and describe five consecutive steps of an e-recruiting transformation model.

Findings

The paper comes up with five stages (transformation of tools, transformation of systems, transformation of workflows, transformation of tasks, and transformation of communication), each influenced by external developments and market tendencies (War for Talent, increasing number of applications, job market switch, globalization of job market, changing communication behavior).

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes to literature by explaining the drivers of an e-HRM transformation and the different stages of this transformation process differentiated by the affected people, processes, and IT. However, it only observes the transformation in one company, hence the transformation of further e-HRM functions in other companies might differ.

Practical implications

The paper highlights both the transformation of e-recruiting and for the related people, processes, and IT, so companies could observe their current status of e-recruiting transformation.

Originality/value

This paper represents the first longitudinal approach observing the transformation of e-recruiting by describing different stages and external influences.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 31 July 2007

Zahir Irani

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228

Abstract

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Shailendra Vyakarnam, Robin Jacobs and Jari Handelberg

There is ample anecdotal evidence, as well as an emergent body of literature, which examines the role of entrepreneurial teams in the success and growth of businesses…

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3379

Abstract

There is ample anecdotal evidence, as well as an emergent body of literature, which examines the role of entrepreneurial teams in the success and growth of businesses. Earlier research by the authors has demonstrated that the core competence required by founding entrepreneurs is the ability to build and manage relationships. Their more recent work suggests that this core competence must be based around a clear vision for the business. In other words, the founding entrepreneur must be able to build a team to deliver the business vision. A review of literature is provided in this paper, offering a definition of the concept and some of the core issues that have to be addressed by entrepreneurs and small firm policies if businesses are to continue growing. This is supported by some preliminary findings from empirical research into how entrepreneurial teams are formed. The paper continues with propositions that can lead to further research in this relatively unexplored field.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 December 2019

Sophie Rummel, Jos Akkermans, Rowena Blokker and Marco Van Gelderen

The purpose of this paper is to explore the career shocks that young, newly graduated entrepreneurs experience in the process of starting a business.

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3965

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the career shocks that young, newly graduated entrepreneurs experience in the process of starting a business.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a qualitative approach, drawing upon 25 semi-structured interviews with entrepreneurs who recently graduated from university (up to the age of 30) in different European countries.

Findings

The analysis identifies several career shocks that can confront entrepreneurs before and after starting a business and reveals how these shocks influence graduates’ decisions to become and continue to be an entrepreneur.

Research limitations/implications

The study sheds light on the diverse nature of career shocks and the importance of integrating agency concepts and environmental influences in career research. It identifies important factors relevant for school-to-work transition research and complements work in entrepreneurship research on necessity and opportunity entrepreneurship, push and pull motives, and entrepreneurial intentions.

Practical implications

Organizations can use the findings to attract and retain young entrepreneurial employees, while higher education organizations can use the findings to better prepare students for a successful transition into entrepreneurship, whether in the corporate or independent form.

Originality/value

The paper integrates the concept of career shocks with literature on entrepreneurship and offers a categorization of career shocks in the pathway to entrepreneurship.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2007

Finn Olav Sveen, Jose M. Sarriegi, Eliot Rich and Jose J. Gonzalez

This research paper aims to examine how incident‐reporting systems function and particularly how the steady growth of high‐priority incidents and the semi‐exponential…

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1594

Abstract

Purpose

This research paper aims to examine how incident‐reporting systems function and particularly how the steady growth of high‐priority incidents and the semi‐exponential growth of low‐priority incidents affect reporting effectiveness. Social pressures that can affect low‐ and high‐priority incident‐reporting rates are also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reviewed the incident‐reporting system literature. As there are few studies of information security reporting systems, they also considered safety‐reporting systems. These have been in use for many years and much is known about them. Safety is used to “fill in the gaps”. The authors then constructed a system dynamics computer simulation model. The model is used to test how an incident‐reporting system reacts under different conditions.

Findings

Incident reporters face incentives and disincentives based on effects on through‐put but have limited knowledge of what is important to the organization's security. Even if a successful incident‐reporting policy is developed, the organization may become the victim of its own success, as a growing volume of reports put higher pressure on incident‐handling resources. Continuously hiring personnel is unsustainable. Continuously improving automated tools for incident response promises more leverage.

Research limitations/implications

The challenges in safety may not be the same as those in information security. However, the model does provide a starting‐point for further enquiries into information security reporting systems.

Originality/value

An examination of basic factors that affect information security reporting systems is provided. Four different policies are presented and examined through simulation scenarios.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

Keywords

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