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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2019

Julie Trebilcock, Manuela Jarrett, Tim Weaver, Colin Campbell, Andrew Forrester, Julian Walker and Paul Moran

The purpose of this paper is to explore the views of NHS England (NHSE) and Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) commissioners about the Offender Personality…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the views of NHS England (NHSE) and Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) commissioners about the Offender Personality Disorder (OPD) pathway.

Design/methodology/approach

A thematic analysis of four semi-structured interviews with NHSE and HMPPS commissioners is conducted.

Findings

Commissioners offered a cautious but confident assessment of the potential effectiveness of the OPD pathway, drawing particular attention to its potential to enhance the confidence and competency of staff, offer better value for money and provide enhanced progression routes for offenders with personality disorders. Additionally, commissioners identified a number of potential risks for the pathway including wider system flux, funding availability, multi-agency working, offender engagement and the need to evidence effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis is based on a small number of interviews. However, there are only a limited number of commissioners involved with the OPD pathway.

Practical implications

While the stronger focus on progression in the OPD pathway is a welcome departure from a narrow focus on high security Dangerous and Severe Personality Disorder (DSPD) services, the foundations of the OPD pathway ultimately lie with the DSPD programme and similar challenges are likely to follow. The system within which the pathway operates is subject to a great deal of flux and this inevitably poses significant challenges for pathway services, staff and offenders, as well as for those of us charged with its evaluation.

Originality/value

There has been limited empirical work with commissioners in the mental health field. The paper offers a unique insight into the perspectives of those responsible for commissioning the OPD pathway.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Sue Patterson, Nicole Goulter and Tim Weaver

The purpose of this paper is to examine the experience and impact of targeted training involving simulation of auditory hallucinations on attitudes and practice of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the experience and impact of targeted training involving simulation of auditory hallucinations on attitudes and practice of professionals working with people with mental illness.

Design/methodology/approach

Pragmatic mixed-method study. Data were collected from 83 professionals who completed training using cross-sectional survey and focus groups. Descriptive, comparative and thematic analyses were performed.

Findings

Training was associated with changes in thinking and attitude related to working with people who hear voices. Participants, who commonly found the simulation confronting, drew on the experience to deepen appreciation of coping with voices that are distressing and develop a new frame of reference for practice. They positioned themselves differently and described adopting a range of practices consistent with the recovery approach. Environmental constraints variously impacted on capacity to enact these practices.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in one centre using a bespoke survey instrument with a sample intrinsically motivated to complete training. Hence, caution should be exercised with regard to generalisability. However, findings are consistent with the limited published literature and the mixed-method approach provided a comprehensive understanding.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrated that the training employed can support development of patient centred, recovery-oriented practices. These are likely essential to optimising patient and service outcomes. Further research is needed to examine the impact of training on a broader cross section of professionals and the outcomes for patients.

Originality/value

The paper provides important new insights regarding the mechanisms by which training can contribute to development of patient-centred care.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2015

Daniel Ames, Deborah L. Seifert and Jay Rich

In an experimental setting, we investigate the impact of religious social identity on whistle-blowing. We hypothesize and find that individuals are less likely to perceive…

Abstract

In an experimental setting, we investigate the impact of religious social identity on whistle-blowing. We hypothesize and find that individuals are less likely to perceive others in their religious group as being behaving unethically. However, we find that once individuals perceive wrongdoing, they are incrementally more likely to whistle-blow when the perpetrator is a member of their religious group.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-666-9

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Adam Mather, Raymond Cipra and Thomas Siegmund

Topologically interlocked materials are a class of materials in which individual unit elements interact with each other through contact only. Cracks and other defects…

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Abstract

Purpose

Topologically interlocked materials are a class of materials in which individual unit elements interact with each other through contact only. Cracks and other defects occurring due to external loading are contained in the individual unit elements. Thus, topologically interlocked materials are damage tolerant and provide high structural integrity. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the concepts of remanufacturing in the context of a material for which the intended use is structural such that the material's structural integrity is of concern. In particular, the study is concerned with the mechanical behavior of a topologically interlocked material.

Design/methodology/approach

A topologically interlocked material based on tetrahedron unit elements is investigated experimentally. Manufacturing with aid of a robotically controlled end‐effector is demonstrated, and mechanical properties are determined for a plate configuration. A conceptual mechanical model for failure of topologically interlocked materials is developed and used to interpret the experimental results.

Findings

It is demonstrated that remanufacturing of the topologically interlocked material is possible with only a limited loss of material performance. The proposed model predicts trends in agreement with the experimental findings.

Research limitations/implications

While the model predictions are qualitatively in agreement with experiments, more detailed finite element models are needed to predict the material performance accurately. Experiments were conducted on a model material obtained from a 3D printer and should be verified on other solids.

Practical implications

The authors demonstrate that damage containment together with the absence of binders or adhesives enables reuse through remanufacturing without loss of structural integrity.

Social implications

Topologically interlocked materials emerge as attractive materials for sustainable engineering once their material performance are weighted with an environmental impact factor.

Originality/value

Remanufacturing experiments on a novel class of materials were conducted and a new model for the characterization of the structural integrity of topologically interlocked materials is proposed and successfully evaluated against experiments in at least qualitative form.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1953

WHEN the British Productivity Council launched its scheme in March for setting up local productivity committees in many parts of this country it was emphasised by Mr…

Abstract

WHEN the British Productivity Council launched its scheme in March for setting up local productivity committees in many parts of this country it was emphasised by Mr. Butler, Chancellor of the Exchequer, that there must be a great expansion of trade at competitive prices. It would require courage, drive and vision, he said. Although he was speaking in what is normally regarded as the close season for Chancellors it did seem then that he was conscious of the need for providing industry with a tangible incentive to expand production.

Details

Work Study, vol. 2 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Book part
Publication date: 28 March 2015

David Chandler

This paper investigates the substance of institutions in the context of business ethics. In particular, I test a theory of stakeholder attention to resource commitments by…

Abstract

This paper investigates the substance of institutions in the context of business ethics. In particular, I test a theory of stakeholder attention to resource commitments by firms that implement the Ethics and Compliance Officer (ECO) position, from 1990 to 2008. Results support the hypothesized curvilinear relationship between resource commitments and stakeholder attention – while both high and low levels of ECO implementation generate low levels of reported ethics transgressions (the former due to good firm behavior and the latter due to stakeholder disengagement), moderate ECO implementation produces elevated transgression reports (due to raised expectations and increased engagement). Contrary to extant theory, results are consistent across both internal and external firm stakeholder groups.

Details

Institutions and Ideals: Philip Selznick’s Legacy for Organizational Studies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-726-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Tim Lockyer

A comparative study was undertaken analysing what accommodation managers and business guests believed were the factors influencing accommodation selection. It was…

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5997

Abstract

A comparative study was undertaken analysing what accommodation managers and business guests believed were the factors influencing accommodation selection. It was discovered that business guests rated “bathroom and shower quality”, “standard of bedroom maintenance” and “comfort of mattress and pillow” highly, while accommodation management rated “courteous, polite, well‐mannered staff”, “enthusiasm, and commitment of staff” and “efficiency of front desk” highly. In contrast, both the business guests and accommodation managers indicated that the cleanliness of the hotel was the most significant factor influencing accommodation selection. The research also identified that there was a statistically significant difference in many items in the survey between what management and guests believed were important, which indicates a lack of understanding by management. The ramifications for management who do not provide those items important to guests are lower occupancy rates and guest dissatisfaction. Further, spending time and money on items that are not so important to guests may not be a wise use of resources. Regarding the question of whether managers understand their guests, this research indicates that they do not.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Jennifer Ireland, Helen Mary Correia and Tim Mark Griffin

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and describe the features of a new e‐learning quality framework developed for a large multi‐campus university. The framework is…

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3074

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and describe the features of a new e‐learning quality framework developed for a large multi‐campus university. The framework is explicitly designed to improve the quality of e‐learning sites and the quality of online student learning, by developing the skills of the academics who design the sites.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper. It examines a range of existing models and literature on evaluative frameworks in e‐learning and positions the new framework within that context. It describes the features that distinguish the new framework from existing models and explains how these differences are tailored to develop the e‐learning design skills of academic staff and to encourage greater engagement with e‐learning quality initiatives across the university.

Findings

The paper identifies several features of the new framework that differ from other models and explains the inclusion of these features in terms of the support they provide for quality improvement at a university where academics are the main designers of e‐learning sites.

Originality/value

The paper makes a contribution to the literature on quality initiatives in e‐learning by introducing a new quality framework that differs in significant respects from other models. The rationale underpinning the inherently developmental design of this framework, as set out in this paper, may be useful to other universities where academics are the main designers of e‐learning sites.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Book part
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Eric J. Morgan

From the 1960s onwards, students and members of the academic community on growing numbers of college and university campuses in the United States chose to confront the…

Abstract

From the 1960s onwards, students and members of the academic community on growing numbers of college and university campuses in the United States chose to confront the issue of apartheid by advocating divestment from corporations or financial institutions with any sort of presence in or relationship with South Africa. Student divestment advocates faced serious opposition from university administrators as well as opponents of institutional divestiture both at home and abroad. Despite these challenges, the academic community in the United States was one of the first arenas where anti-apartheid activism coalesced. This chapter examines the campaigns of students and educators who participated in the debate over divestment – to engage with the South African government and apartheid through dialogue and communication or to disengage completely from the country through withdrawal of financial investments. The anti-apartheid efforts of the academic community at Michigan State University, one of the first large research universities in the United States to confront the issue of apartheid and divestment at the university level and beyond, serves as a window to view academic activism against apartheid. The Southern Africa Liberation Committee (SALC), a consortium of students, faculty, and community members dedicated to aiding the liberation struggle of Southern Africa, led the efforts at Michigan State and collaborated with allies across Michigan and the United States. SALC focused most of its efforts on South Africa, though the organization also confronted the issue of South Africa's controversial occupation of South West Africa and the ongoing civil war in Angola.

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1989

David Smith, Tim Wolstencroft and Jayne Southern

The research reported here attempts to identify the personal skillswhich are important in the early years of graduate employment. Theresults are based on responses from…

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2161

Abstract

The research reported here attempts to identify the personal skills which are important in the early years of graduate employment. The results are based on responses from over 250 business and law graduates in the UK. When discussing the results a number of practical considerations for employers are highlighted. These include the importance of defining precise skill requirements and their relationship with attitudinal and knowledge‐based competences. The results suggest that some differences in skill requirements exist between employment sectors, and this may have implications for attempts to identify general managerial competences.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 13 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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