Search results

1 – 10 of 108
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Tim Sharpe

One of the most significant challenges facing contemporary architectural and urban design is how it can become more sustainable. Energy consumption by housing is a major…

Abstract

One of the most significant challenges facing contemporary architectural and urban design is how it can become more sustainable. Energy consumption by housing is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions and a cause of depletion of non-renewable energy sources. Of particular concern is existing stock, which has the worst performance and is hardest to improve.

One means of addressing these issues that is attracting increasing interest is the integration of embedded renewable energy technologies. This paper discusses the use of wind turbines on buildings as a response to climate change legislation. It examines the potential for embedded generation in a specific built form (existing high rise housing) and places this in the context of a particular geographical location (Glasgow, Scotland) where the existing provision is highly problematic, but which also presents significant potential. It describes findings from two projects in Glasgow, a pilot installation on a city centre multi-storey block, and subsequent feasibility study for a Housing Association managed multi-storey block and identifies the problems and opportunities that may be applied in similar projects elsewhere.

Details

Open House International, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1976

This study was undertaken by William Keyser and Tim Sharpe of Metra Oxford Consulting Limited with the Oxford Centre for Management Studies, supported by the Midland Bank…

Abstract

This study was undertaken by William Keyser and Tim Sharpe of Metra Oxford Consulting Limited with the Oxford Centre for Management Studies, supported by the Midland Bank Limited and the Gatsby Charitable Foundation. The report is intended as a contribution to the national debate on manpower policy. It focusses on the way policies are administered and the degree to which they have the effects intended. It compares the way manpower policy is administered in Britain, West Germany and Sweden and suggests ways in which the effectiveness of the system could be increased. There is much in this report that is of interest, but we have selected chapter 2, Conclusions, to reproduce here. This gives a good summing up of the authors' recommendations and should encourage those interested in this field to study the report in full. Also of interest is what the report has to say about the role of the Manpower Services Commission—a topic on which there has been remarkably little comment in Britain. The conclusions below are derived by the authors from points argued in the chapters which follow, but are not a complete list of all that might be drawn. They are based on the notion that while Britain has many of the necessary components of successful manpower policies, their orientation is lacking in two respects: one is a set of declared national goals and the other is an operational system set up with the objective of meeting the needs of individuals.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Tim Sharpe and Donald Shearer

The stone tenement is perhaps the most iconic type of housing in Scotland and to a large extent defines the built environment of its major cities and towns. However in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The stone tenement is perhaps the most iconic type of housing in Scotland and to a large extent defines the built environment of its major cities and towns. However in the context of the climate change agenda which demands reduced energy consumption and CO2 production, such buildings are recognised to be a particular challenge in terms of both their poor energy performance, but also the limitations on improvement measures that do not have a detrimental affect on their form and appearance. As a result interventions that improve performance tend to less mainstream and it is therefore import to assess the effectiveness of these, and this was the purpose of the research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes the findings of a post occupancy evaluation that examined the user satisfaction and energy performance of a recently completed (2008) adaptive rehabilitation project of a listed 19th Century sandstone tenement block in Edinburgh city centre. the project undertook a short intensive monitoring programme to gather both qualitative and quantitative data on occupancy and internal environmental conditions.

Findings

The project incorporates low carbon technologies and high thermal performance into an existing and historic structure, including internal insulation, a ground source heat pump with underfloor heating, sunspaces and MVHR, which are intended to reduce energy consumption whilst maintaining the built form and appearance. Although generally successful the research identified problems occurring with systems and users interaction with these, leading to incidences of poor environmental quality and increased energy use.

Research limitations/implications

The research identified issues with higher than designed energy use and poor environmental conditions. More detailed research is required into the design for energy and environmental performance of these buildings, and the effects of poor IAQ on occupants, and how these problems can be avoided in the future.

Practical implications

The paper concludes by discussing improvements which could be made to this structure and future design considerations that could improve performance.

Social implications

Concerns over occupant health in refurbished buildings are likely to affect policy, regulation and user acceptability, which if unmanaged, could undermine the energy reduction agenda.

Originality/value

This research provides original data on environmental performance arising from new forms of energy improvements being implemented to meet building standards and carbon reduction targets in a common building typology.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Ron van Oers and Ana Pereira Roders

This article is an editorial to JCHMSD's Volume 3, Issue 1 and aims to provide an overview to its selection of papers.

Abstract

Purpose

This article is an editorial to JCHMSD's Volume 3, Issue 1 and aims to provide an overview to its selection of papers.

Design/methodology/approach

The article builds upon a previous editorial on the implementation of the new UNESCO Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape (HUL). It discusses a research and training programme under development by the World Heritage Institute of Training and Research in Asia and the Pacific (WHITRAP) and Tongji University's Advanced Research Institute for Architecture and Urban Planning, in Shanghai, China, to help determining a strategy for the application of the HUL approach in China.

Findings

The HUL approach facilitates a structuring and priority setting of competing needs and demands for the integration of urban development and heritage management processes, which is perhaps most pressing in the current Chinese context of rapid and large‐scale urbanization. However, its precise meaning, and therefore its merit, is still poorly understood in China due to confusing conceptual foundations and interpretations, primarily related to the terminology of “cultural landscape”.

Originality/value

This research paper outlines a series of pertinent issues and questions as part of a critical path –a “road map”– for the application of the HUL approach, as promoted by UNESCO, in China and it outlines key areas for further research, in particular as concerns the development of a toolkit.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2010

Stephen L. Vargo, Robert F. Lusch, Melissa Archpru Akaka and Yi He

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-728-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Tim Leung and Hung Nguyen

This paper aims to present a methodology for constructing cointegrated portfolios consisting of different cryptocurrencies and examines the performance of a number of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a methodology for constructing cointegrated portfolios consisting of different cryptocurrencies and examines the performance of a number of trading strategies for the cryptocurrency portfolios.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply a series of statistical methods, including the Johansen test and Engle–Granger test, to derive a linear combination of cryptocurrencies that form a mean-reverting portfolio. Trading systems are designed and different trading strategies with stop-loss constraints are tested and compared according to a set of performance metrics.

Findings

The paper finds cointegrated portfolios involving four cryptocurrencies: Bitcoin (BTC), Ethereum (ETH), Bitcoin Cash (BCH) and Litecoin (LTC), and the corresponding trading strategies are shown to be profitable under different configurations.

Originality/value

The main contributions of the study are the use of multiple altcoins in addition to bitcoin to construct a cointegrated portfolio, and the detailed comparison of the performance of different trading strategies with and without stop-loss constraints.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Alireza Tourani‐Rad and Ye YI

This paper looks at one relatively less‐visited issue in market timing: switching investments on common stocks between different stock markets, namely, “intermarket…

Abstract

This paper looks at one relatively less‐visited issue in market timing: switching investments on common stocks between different stock markets, namely, “intermarket timing”. By employing the stock price data for the period of 1992‐2002 from a developed market, Hong Kong, and two emerging markets, Shanghai and Shenzhen, this paper examines potential gains and the required predictive accuracy for intermarket timing between Hong Kong and Shanghai, and between Hong Kong and Shenzhen from Hong Kong investors’ perspective. Potential gains could be obtained from such timing strategy, and the non‐high minimum forecasting ability required for successful timing is fairly attainable for Hong Kong investors, even after taking into account the assumed transaction costs.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Brian Rooks

A report on the Total Engineering and Manufacturing (TEAM) exhibition held at the NEC, Birmingham with a focus on vision and optical systems for inspection and…

Abstract

A report on the Total Engineering and Manufacturing (TEAM) exhibition held at the NEC, Birmingham with a focus on vision and optical systems for inspection and measurement. New low cost and high speed smart cameras were introduced by DVT, who was “hidden” away within the Design Engineering Show area of TEAM. All other exhibits described fell within the Inspex exhibition area. Laser tracking for measuring large products was demonstrated by Leica and Faro. The latter company also launched a new small portable measuring arm at the show. Other companies showing portable arms included Romer, who had a new tube measuring systems, and Europac who had a first showing of component recognition software and 3D scanning. DEA Brown & Sharpe also exhibited a portable arm as well as a new CMM laser scanning system.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Tim Metcalfe

The police service has been encouraged to become a “self-reforming sector”, yet there is an acknowledgement of a “blame culture” within the policing. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

The police service has been encouraged to become a “self-reforming sector”, yet there is an acknowledgement of a “blame culture” within the policing. The purpose of this paper is to explore the barriers to “self-reform”, as identified by chief officers, and propose a series of strategies to help inform the future of police leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is primarily underpinned by a series of semi-structured interviews with chief constables and a series of four workshops.

Findings

The paper argues that contemporary police cultures, and approaches to failure, are not conducive to the realisation of a “self-reforming” sector. It is proposed that strategic future leaders should consider establishing a common process for organisational learning whilst simultaneously encouraging cultural change that de-stigmatises failure and supports the development of adaptive and networked learning organisations.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited by exclusively drawing on the perspective of chief officers and does not engage a representative cross section of the police service. The absence of detailed analysis of Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary findings to complement the review of IPCC recommendations is a limitation that weakens subsequent conclusions. Finally, this research would benefit considerations of potential structural and organisational changes that would support the realisation of a “self-reforming sector”.

Practical implications

This research supports work by the National Police Chiefs’ Council to deliver police reform.

Originality/value

The paper is informed by new and original qualitative research explicitly focused on the perspective of senior police leaders.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-728-5

1 – 10 of 108