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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

Tim Plunkett

As concurrent engineering helps to reduce project lead times, toolsare also required to control risk. Centres on a case study of atelephone, ultimately for British Telecom…

Abstract

As concurrent engineering helps to reduce project lead times, tools are also required to control risk. Centres on a case study of a telephone, ultimately for British Telecom that was developed during 1993. Stereolithography and rapid prototyping were accessed via Formation Engineering on a bureau basis to provide a dramatic reduction in the product development cycle while simultaneously reducing risk. The justification for prototyping being sustainable on time, risk or financial grounds. It is, however, usually the economics debate that rages for longest as the justification of prototypes is frequently sought within the design phase and not the project as a whole. Incorporating loss of profits due to delayed sales will introduce at least an order of magnitude difference, making the real decision a “no brainer”.

Details

World Class Design to Manufacture, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-3074

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Tim Bottorff

This paper aims to provide an overview of the field of hospitality management and a guide to the major books, databases, web sites, and other resources that comprise a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of the field of hospitality management and a guide to the major books, databases, web sites, and other resources that comprise a quality hospitality management reference collection.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a short introduction and overview, key sources and annotations are presented in categories that will help reference and collection librarians to better understand and serve hospitality management students. The sources were identified through the author's experience, library research guides and web sites, bibliographies, and other standard sources.

Findings

Hospitality management is growing and maturing as an academic discipline, aided by the fact that the field offers good job prospects. The key sources pertaining to hospitality management are scattered among several different industry sectors, including food and beverage, lodging, meetings and special events, travel and tourism, and theme parks and attractions.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to systematically identify key reference works for the field of hospitality management. It will be useful for librarians who work with business, culinary arts, hospitality management, or related fields.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

Greg MacLeod, Bruce McFarlane and Charles H. Davis

Posits that most contemporary interest in the university‐industry linkages stems from a concern to increase the birth rate of new technology‐based firms and/or the…

Abstract

Posits that most contemporary interest in the university‐industry linkages stems from a concern to increase the birth rate of new technology‐based firms and/or the velocity with which indigenous scientific capability is translated into commercial technologies. Notes that many analysts of science parks and silicon valleys argue that this kind of knowledge‐based innovation requires cosmopolitan economic and social milieux with good communication links, easy access to air transport, highly educated workers and sophisticated cultural amenities. Argues that on the receiving end of contemporary innovation systems are indigenous and other disempowered groups and economically depleted communities with little stake in scientific and technical advancement and virtually no involvement in the policy or social networks set up to steer the knowledge system. Describes an experiment to discover processes by which marginalized, economically distressed communities can use institutions of the “knowledge economy” to foster the social and technological innovation necessary for their survival. Joins the University College of Cape Breton with universities in Mexico to form structured relationships with communities on Cape Breton Island and with a Mayan community on the Yucatán Peninsula. Bases techniques on searching for economic opportunities, construction of community business organizations, training, community development and supportive aftercare services to provide the three components of community economic regeneration: finance, technology and formation. Works to find ways to use the dynamics of triple helix innovation to construct knowledge systems that work in favour of the peripheral communities threatened by trade liberalization and the decline of resource regions. Specifically asks how can the institutions of the “knowledge economy” contribute to the development of a local sub‐economy that supports local businesses? Employs a social economy approach to the establishment of community businesses, differing from others in the community business movement in the belief that the “knowledge economy” can provide resources and eventual economic and social survivability to distressed regions. Argues that economic regeneration among marginal groups requires: access to improved production and organizational technologies; that universities can provide this access, especially in distressed communities; a transfer system usually has to be established; specific steps must be taken to establish new community businesses; and a maintenance system with specific characteristics must be established.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 24 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 23 December 2010

Alan O'Day

Butt can be placed within the framework of what George Boyce (1995, pp. 18–19) terms colonial patriotism. Butt's analyses of Ireland's economy and development during the…

Abstract

Butt can be placed within the framework of what George Boyce (1995, pp. 18–19) terms colonial patriotism. Butt's analyses of Ireland's economy and development during the next years brought together the several strands that marked out an Ireland of citizens, an Ireland of sort which has emerged at the turn of the present millennium. What were the influences on Butt and what is his place in the development of political economy? His position is best characterised as eclectic and distinct from the other early holders of the Whately Chair. Drawing upon but not endorsing classical political economy, Adam Smith, Longfield, Jean-Baptiste Say and others, Butt defies pigeonholing. His economic analysis emerged slowly, and initially, there was little hint that he would expand on Longfield's position which essentially was a theory of profit (McGovern, 2000, p. 5). However, Butt moved beyond Longfield's analysis and whereas the latter remained in the classical tradition on free trade, he did not. He expanded Longfield's approach that crucial to the determination of the price of goods was the importance of applying a unit of whatever resource to its marginal use, concluding that the factors of production were remunerated in relation to the utility they created in their least efficient, marginal employment (Boylan & Foley, 2003, Vol. 2, p. 10). His importance, it has been observed, was in drawing attention to the potential resource mobilisation and distribution aspects of protection and in assessing the benefits and weaknesses of protection in relation to the complexity of specific circumstances (Boylan and Foley, 2003, Vol. 3, p. 5). Butt's Whatley lectures have received most attention although it will be suggested that certain of his other writings were as important or even more significant as indicative of his ideas on political economy. In his first Whatley lecture (Butt, 1837a), appropriating the title ‘Introduction’, Butt outlined somewhat verbosely the scope of what he intended to address and adopted the high ground about the purpose of political economy. He declared it was ‘to teach certain truths connected with the social condition of man – it attempts to explain the nature of the causes by which is brought about that singular machinery of society by which Providence has set man to supply each other's wants, and thus receive and confer a mutual benefit’ (1837a, p. 23). Butt addressed the question of production and the creation of ‘utility’. Employing the illustration of cotton stockings, Butt demonstrated the complex interchange required to produce even the most mundane of articles (1837a, pp. 25–26). ‘When you purchase your pair of cotton stockings’, he noted, ‘you are positively commanding for your own personal comfort and accommodation, not only the services of thousands of your cotemporary fellow creatures, but the accumulated results of the labours of generations that have long since passed away’ (1837a, p. 28). Thus, he maintained, political economy ‘teaches the laws which regulate the production, distribution and consumption of wealth’ (1837a, p. 30).

Details

English, Irish and Subversives among the Dismal Scientists
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-061-3

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2020

Tim Schürmann, Nina Gerber and Paul Gerber

Online privacy research has seen a focus on user behavior over the last decade, partly to understand and explain user decision-making and seeming inconsistencies regarding…

Abstract

Purpose

Online privacy research has seen a focus on user behavior over the last decade, partly to understand and explain user decision-making and seeming inconsistencies regarding users' stated preferences. This article investigates the level of modeling that contemporary approaches rely on to explain said inconsistencies and whether drawn conclusions are justified by the applied modeling methodology. Additionally, it provides resources for researchers interested in using computational modeling.

Design/methodology/approach

The article uses data from a pre-existing literature review on the privacy paradox (N = 179 articles) to identify three characteristics of prior research: (1) the frequency of references to computational-level theories of human decision-making and perception in the literature, (2) the frequency of interpretations of human decision-making based on computational-level theories, and (3) the frequency of actual computational-level modeling implementations.

Findings

After excluding unrelated articles, 44.1 percent of investigated articles reference at least one theory that has been traditionally interpreted on a computational level. 33.1 percent of all relevant articles make statements regarding computational properties of human cognition in online privacy scenarios. Meanwhile, 5.1 percent of all relevant articles apply formalized computational-level modeling to substantiate their claims.

Originality/value

The findings highlight the importance of formal, computational-level modeling in online privacy research, which has so far drawn computational-level conclusions without utilizing appropriate modeling techniques. Furthermore, this article provides an overview of said modeling techniques and their benefits to researchers, as well as references for model theories and resources for practical implementation.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Tim O. Peterson and David D. Van Fleet

Robert L. Katz first called attention to the problem of identifying those skills necessary for successful performance in managerial roles. This paper identifies the impact…

Abstract

Robert L. Katz first called attention to the problem of identifying those skills necessary for successful performance in managerial roles. This paper identifies the impact of Katz's classic 1955 work on managerial skills and notes the continuing legacy of his work. Modifications and additions appearing in the management literature, particularly introductory or principles textbooks, are noted with a suggested expansion of Katz's work that would subsume the dominant ones of those. The importance of managerial skills to the carrying out of managerial functions is also discussed.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 42 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 17 March 2020

Sian Calvert, Robert C. Dempsey and Rachel Povey

Childhood obesity is a major global health concern. Understanding children's and adolescent’s eating behaviours and promoting healthier behaviours is key for reducing the…

Abstract

Purpose

Childhood obesity is a major global health concern. Understanding children's and adolescent’s eating behaviours and promoting healthier behaviours is key for reducing the negative health outcomes associated with obesity. The current study explored the perceptions of healthy eating behaviours and the influences on eating behaviours amongst 11-to-13-year-old secondary school students.

Design/methodology/approach

Nine semi-structured same-sex focus group discussions were conducted in schools located in deprived areas of England, with the discussions subjected to a thematic framework analysis.

Findings

Three main constructs were identified in the analysis as follows: (1) eating patterns and lifestyle, (2) social influences and (3) environmental influences. Participants understood what healthy eating behaviours are and the benefits of eating healthy; yet, they reported irregular mealtimes and consuming unhealthy snacks. Students reported that their parents and fellow student peers were strong influences on their own eating behaviours, with girls subjected to being teased by male students for attempting to eat healthily. Finally, students perceived that unhealthy foods were cheaper, tasted better and were readily available in their social environments compared to healthier options, making healthier behaviours less likely to occur.

Originality/value

Findings indicate that students had a good understanding of healthy eating behaviours but did not always practise them and are seemingly influenced by their social and environmental context. The promotion of healthier eating in this age group needs to challenge the misperceptions associated with the accessibility and social acceptability of unhealthy food items.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

K.E. Maani, M.S. Putterill and D.G. Sluti

Despite a strong research output in quality in recent years, theliterature is still scant in empirical studies of commonly held qualitytheories. Empirically investigates…

Abstract

Despite a strong research output in quality in recent years, the literature is still scant in empirical studies of commonly held quality theories. Empirically investigates the operational and strategic impact of improved process quality and describes the construction of a model of process quality and its correlates in manufacturing. Using empirical data, the study performs a micro assessment of the impact of quality on operations performance. Implications for the business unit as a whole are also considered. Since the research domain of the study is manufacturing industry, the conformance dimension of quality has been adopted as a more precise and measurable definition than those followed in other research. Structural equation modelling (SEM) is used for analysing the magnitude and direction of hypothesized relationships, a rigorous and reliable way of testing multivariate data and path models. Research findings generally support the consensus view that there is a favourable impact of enhanced quality in the form of improvements in productivity, inprocess inventory, on‐time delivery, and manufacturing cost. Flow‐through effects on business performance were also noted though not in all dimensions. This research complements marketing‐oriented evaluation which has been a feature of approaches to date.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Neal J. Roese and Evan Meagher

On April 4, 2013, a video game website reported that the next-generation Xbox console—due to be released by Microsoft the following month—would require an always-on…

Abstract

On April 4, 2013, a video game website reported that the next-generation Xbox console—due to be released by Microsoft the following month—would require an always-on Internet connection in order to operate. The new version of the SimCity game that had been released earlier that year with an always-on requirement had been a disaster. Hardcore gamers reacted negatively to the news.

When the Xbox One console was officially revealed on May 21, Microsoft effectively confirmed that it would require an always-on connection for validating digital rights. Predictably, gamers reacted negatively, a response that was exacerbated when Microsoft's president of the interactive entertainment business, Don Mattrick, made dismissive statements about their concerns

After reading and analyzing the case, students will be able to:

  • Address the challenge of marketing a product to multiple adjacent but very different customer segments

  • Understand the need for a unified vision before going to market

  • Develop a strategy that addresses the complexity of a world in which the company may no longer own the “loudest voice in the room”

Address the challenge of marketing a product to multiple adjacent but very different customer segments

Understand the need for a unified vision before going to market

Develop a strategy that addresses the complexity of a world in which the company may no longer own the “loudest voice in the room”

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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