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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2021

Kerry Shephard, Qudsia Kalsoom, Ritika Gupta, Lorenz Probst, Paul Gannon, V. Santhakumar, Ifeanyi Glory Ndukwe and Tim Jowett

Higher education is uncertain which sustainability-related education targets should be sought and monitored. Accepting that something needs to be measurable to be…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher education is uncertain which sustainability-related education targets should be sought and monitored. Accepting that something needs to be measurable to be systematically improved, the authors explored how measures relate to potential targets. This paper aims to focus on dispositions to think critically (active open-minded thinking and fair-minded thinking in appraising reasoning) as measures and explored how they related to sustainability concern as an indicative educational target.

Design/methodology/approach

This research included the development and testing of research instruments (scales) that explored dispositions to critical thinking and sustainability concern. Authors researched these instruments within their own correspondence groups and tested them with university students and staff in Pakistan, the USA, Austria, India and New Zealand. The authors also asked a range of contextualising questions.

Findings

Respondents’ disposition to aspects of active, open-minded thinking and fair-minded thinking do predict their concern about facets of sustainability but their strength of religious belief was an important factor in these relationships and in their measurement.

Practical implications

This research demonstrates the complexity of monitoring dispositions to think critically and sustainability concern in educational systems, particularly in circumstances where the roles of religious beliefs are of interest; and suggests ways to address this complexity.

Originality/value

This research integrates and expands discourses on ESD and on critical thinking in diverse disciplines and cultures. It investigates measurement approaches and targets that could help higher education institutions to educate for sustainable development and to monitor their progress, in ways that are compatible with their culture and values.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Alex Messina

This paper aims to consider whether ethical persuasion can be part of public relations practice.

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23962

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider whether ethical persuasion can be part of public relations practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper contends that the critical issue for practitioners is not whether they engage in persuasion, but whether they do so ethically. Accordingly, a definition of ethical persuasion is derived by examining unethical propaganda. The paper then considers what standard might be used to assess the ethics of persuasion. The notion of “the public interest” – ubiquitously linked to ethical practice in public relations – is considered but found to be too elusive to guide the practice individual practitioners. Other more assessable standards are identified, as is a guiding approach to ethics. The approach to ethics adopted in this paper is rule utilitarianism. The methodology of this paper is deductive and derivative analysis, argument and synthesis, drawn from a broad body of literature.

Findings

Persuasion can be ethical, and a definition of ethical persuasion is proffered. The public interest is not a standard that individual practitioners can determine, decide, know, or apply to assess the ethics of their practice. Ethical persuasion can, however, be assessed using other standards, discussed in the paper. Consequently, a set of criteria and standards to practicing ethical persuasion is developed.

Research limitations/implications

The paper does not extend into a discussion of practical persuasive techniques. Therefore, an extension of this examination could consider a thorough assessment of the ethics of practical persuasive communication techniques.

Practical implications

Directly relevant to the daily work of public relations practitioners, communicators, adertisers and marketers, who are interested in acting ethically. The paper provide a basis for a guide to assessing the ethics of persuasive practice.

Originality/value

This paper confronts both the question of whether practitioners can use the notion of the public interest to assess the ethics of practice, and also what constitutes ethical (and unethical) persuasion, and considers how persuation can be used ethically.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1975

MIKE PEARCE, NORMAN TOMLINSON, FRANK WINDRUSH and PAUL SYKES

DURING THE twelve days of Christmas, between the King's speech and Twelfth Night, after the chocolate smoking set had been consumed, though not in flames and smoke, and…

Abstract

DURING THE twelve days of Christmas, between the King's speech and Twelfth Night, after the chocolate smoking set had been consumed, though not in flames and smoke, and before the Christmas decorations had sagged to waist level, I used to read my annuals.

Details

New Library World, vol. 76 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1968

ALTHOUGH the first Public Libraries (Scotland) Act was placed on the Statute Book in 1853, it was not until 1899 that the Corporation of the City of Glasgow was empowered…

Abstract

ALTHOUGH the first Public Libraries (Scotland) Act was placed on the Statute Book in 1853, it was not until 1899 that the Corporation of the City of Glasgow was empowered to establish and maintain public libraries throughout the city. Between 1876 and 1897 four attempts were made to secure public approval for the adoption of the Public Libraries (Scotland) Acts, but when all these efforts proved unsuccessful, the Corporation decided in June, 1888 to include in a Local Bill for submission to Parliament, certain clauses conferring upon themselves the power to become a library authority. Promoted in 1899, the Bill became known as the Glasgow Corporation (Tramways, Libraries, etc.) Act 1899, and the library clauses passed through Parliament without opposition and received Royal Assent on 1st August, 1899. The powers conferred by this Local Act empowered the Corporation:

Details

New Library World, vol. 69 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1990

Verena Thompson, Edwin Fleming and Allan Bunch

The African Caribbean Library Association's (ACLA) current Chair is Gloria Lock of Wandsworth Libraries. I interviewed her recently about the Association — the results of…

Abstract

The African Caribbean Library Association's (ACLA) current Chair is Gloria Lock of Wandsworth Libraries. I interviewed her recently about the Association — the results of which are reproduced here with her consent.

Details

New Library World, vol. 91 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Gil Bozer, James C. Sarros and Joseph C. Santora

Little empirical research has examined the role of coach characteristics in coaching success. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap in the literature by…

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4195

Abstract

Purpose

Little empirical research has examined the role of coach characteristics in coaching success. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap in the literature by identifying and testing the relationships between a coach's academic background in psychology and credibility with executive coaching effectiveness as reflected in greater levels of individual outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

These factors were examined through a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design. Participants were drawn from the client bases of four Israeli executive coaching agencies.

Findings

A coach's academic background in psychology was positively related to executive coaching effectiveness as reflected in greater improvement in coachee self-awareness and job performance as reported by the direct supervisor. Further, coach credibility was positively related to executive coaching effectiveness as reflected in higher mean scores in coachee self-reported job performance.

Originality/value

Findings should assist businesses and educators in improving the formal preparation of coaches and in better identifying and selecting competent coaches. This may lead to better executive coaching design, implementation, and outcomes. Recommendations for future research are provided.

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Chamila Perera and Chandana Hewege

This study aims to explore how young adults understand the climate change problem. It also explores whether environmental paradigms explain how young adults perceive…

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1266

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how young adults understand the climate change problem. It also explores whether environmental paradigms explain how young adults perceive climate change risks in their everyday green conscious behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

This interpretive research draws on in-depth interviews with 20 young Australians (aged between 19-25 years) who engage in green conscious behavior.

Findings

Three thematic categories (“non-local” climate change risk, oscillation between environmental paradigms and anthropocentric environmentalism) emerged from the data. The study finds that “non-local” climate change risk perceptions and environmental paradigms inform green conscious behavior. However, no association between environmental paradigms and climate change risk perceptions is found. The study postulates a skeletal theoretical framework for understanding the green conscious behavior of young adults.

Practical implications

Recommendations are provided on how to sustain young adults’ interest in environmental wellbeing and in promoting green commodities in young consumer markets. Suggestions include creating a clear awareness of climate change with a constructive or positive appeal resolving ‘non-local’ climate change risk perceptions and position green commodities as “pro-actions” or “solutions”, as opposed to “reactions”, when reaching young consumer markets.

Originality/value

A high level of green consciousness among young adults is recorded in recent global surveys. This green conscious young consumer segment, however, appears to be largely ignored by green commodity marketers. This study provides green commodity marketers with necessary insights to explore the opportunities that might arise in this unique market segment.

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