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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Tim Hughes, Mario Vafeas and Toni Hilton

Resource integration is a central idea within service-dominant logic (S-D logic), but there has been little scholarly research on this aspect of theory. This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Resource integration is a central idea within service-dominant logic (S-D logic), but there has been little scholarly research on this aspect of theory. This paper aims to explore resource integration between marketing agencies and their clients.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, nine case studies have been developed using a dyadic approach of interviewing clients and members of their agency teams. This is followed-up with presentations and workshops with over 200 practitioners who validated the findings and added new perspectives.

Findings

The key operant resources in the client/agency context have been identified. The ways the operant resources of the actors developed during the course of resource integration, building potential resources for future co-creation are shown. The differing perspectives of the actors to each other’s contribution are highlighted.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests that resource enhancement and development, as a result of integration, is important. For agency/client research, resource integration and development brings new perspectives complementing existing relationship approaches to research. The findings have implications for relationship marketing theory across business-to-business (B2B) contexts.

Practical implications

The findings suggest a resource integration approach that could be jointly addressed between agency and client in improving the way they work together. The discourse of co-creation suggests a way for them to talk about how to work together effectively. Suggestions are made for teaching.

Originality/value

This study develops the S-D logic theory through exploring resource enhancement and development in a B2B co-creation context. The dyadic nature of the research is novel in studying how marketing agencies and clients work together and new perspectives emerge from the approach.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Tim John Hughes

E‐commerce has been much hyped as a potentially transformational force in many industries, and financial services is an industry where its impact is expected to be…

Abstract

E‐commerce has been much hyped as a potentially transformational force in many industries, and financial services is an industry where its impact is expected to be particularly strong. In this qualitative research four case studies have been developed, from a series of in‐depth interviews, to investigate the way some UK financial services organisations have responded to this innovation. By taking a broad perspective, from a range of managers across a number of disciplines, this study particularly focuses on the application of marketing principles, on an organisation wide basis, to the new challenges presented by e‐commerce. E‐commerce can be seen to present considerable structural and cultural challenges for large established organisations. It is also potentially changing a number of aspects of customer management. Significant areas for further research are identified.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Tim J. Hughes

Financial services companies are in a uniqueposition to measure the performance of theirmarketing activities. Marketing is still relativelynew in this sector and marketers…

Abstract

Financial services companies are in a unique position to measure the performance of their marketing activities. Marketing is still relatively new in this sector and marketers need to support their case with figures. A case study of how a Building Society sold an investment bond is given to demonstrate how sales can be measured through different channels. The sales channels were: branches, direct mail, newspaper advertising and telesales. Examples of pro formas are given to demonstrate what information can be gained with the benefit of forward planning. Some information may be needed on a daily basis while more detailed information may be weekly or monthly. Every method by which sales can be measured and attributed to advertising should be examined for every campaign. TV advertising is sometimes difficult to quantify. However, with a regional branch network often sales results can be judged, and an example of a method of calculating this is given.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Paul Grainge and Catherine Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the professional culture of television marketing in the UK, the sector of arts marketing responsible for the vast majority of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the professional culture of television marketing in the UK, the sector of arts marketing responsible for the vast majority of programme trailers and channel promos seen on British television screens.

Design/methodology/approach

In research approach, it draws on participant observation at Promax UK, the main trade conference and award ceremony of the television marketing community. Developing John Caldwell’s analysis of the cultural practices of worker groups, it uses Promax as a site of study itself, exploring how a key trade gathering forges, legitimates and ritualizes the identity and practice of those involved in television marketing.

Findings

Its findings show how Promax transmits industrial lore, not only about “how to do” the job of television marketing but also “how to be” in the professional field. If trade gatherings enable professional communities to express their own values to themselves, Promax members are constructed as “TV people” rather than just “marketing people”; the creative work of television marketing is seen as akin to the creative work of television production and positioned as part of the television industry.

Originality/value

The value of the paper is the exploration of television marketing as a professional and creative discipline. This is especially relevant to marketing and media academics who have tended to overlook, or dismiss, the sector and skills of television promotion.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Tim Hughes

Abstract

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Tim Hughes, David Bence, Louise Grisoni, Nicholas O'Regan and David Wornham

This paper seeks to investigate what the marketing field can learn, with regard to the academic/practitioner divide, from other management disciplines that have a range of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to investigate what the marketing field can learn, with regard to the academic/practitioner divide, from other management disciplines that have a range of different relationships with their respective practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors carried out 68 interviews of academics, practitioners and experts/consultants involved in academic/practitioner engagement from the marketing, accountancy, strategic management and organisation studies disciplines.

Findings

The most interesting aspects relate to two areas: exclusive engagement (as exemplified in accountancy) versus inclusive engagement (as exemplified in strategic management), and the practices associated with participative research (as exemplified in organisation studies). The appropriate approach to engagement will depend on the nature of the relationship between the academic field and its particular community of practitioners.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to academics, practitioners and experts/consultants operating from the UK. However, the findings on the challenges of engagement are consistent with those reported in the extant literature.

Practical implications

The first implication relates to defining what we mean when we talk about “practice”. The literature is often vague with regard to this. Does it relate to functional professionals or a far wider group of non‐specialists? A useful starting point might be to conduct an audit to clarify where aspects of marketing theory are relevant. The second implication relates to what needs to be done to engage with non‐inclusive groups of practitioners. Some conditions required for success are outlined.

Originality/value

The paper explores a knowledge gap in relation to the practice of engagement. It identifies why it is important to debate the nature of the practitioner community, and provides some guidelines for effective engagement.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 46 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Tim Hughes

The purpose of this paper is to put forward some ideas on how Marketing Intelligence & Planning (MIP) might further pursue its crossover mission in the future.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to put forward some ideas on how Marketing Intelligence & Planning (MIP) might further pursue its crossover mission in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a viewpoint contribution based on the author's research on academic/practitioner engagement within the marketing field.

Findings

A number of ideas are outlined under the following headings: creating an MIP community; creating mutually interesting content; demonstrating practical application; links with professional bodies; motivating academics.

Originality/value

The paper stimulates debate around how a crossover journal can become more effective in promoting academic/practitioner knowledge exchange.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Tim Hughes, Nicholas O'Regan and David Wornham

Many academics have raised concerns about the growing divide between academia and practice. While more collaborative research has been called for there is a lack of

Abstract

Purpose

Many academics have raised concerns about the growing divide between academia and practice. While more collaborative research has been called for there is a lack of research into the actual practice of academic/practitioner engagement. This research aims to explore the application of strategic management theory and the role of universities in exchanging strategic management knowledge to practice.

Design/methodology/approach

In depth interviews were undertaken with practitioners, academics and experts in order to get a balance of views from different perspectives.

Findings

Organizations seem to have absorbed standard, iconic strategy techniques and are not, generally, relying on academia for new insights. On the academic side there is some uncertainty about what industry “needs”. The transfer of new strategy approaches can only be achieved once practitioners acknowledge the credibility of academia in contributing to practitioner related issues.

Practical implications

For academics to have credibility with practitioners the context and content of collaborations need to be more proactively managed through more effective processes. The context relates to understanding the operating environment that the firm is in and how the firm's goals and objective are aligned with that environment. The content refers to the program of research or action areas selected as part of the collaboration framework. The process refers to how the collaboration is handled.

Originality/value

The research takes up the challenge of exploring how academics and practitioners in strategic management can work more effectively together in order to apply the latest strategic thinking to the real‐life complexities of the contemporary business world.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Tim Hughes

The study outlined in this paper seeks to deepen one's understanding of the theoretical and practical implications for marketing management where an internet component has…

Abstract

Purpose

The study outlined in this paper seeks to deepen one's understanding of the theoretical and practical implications for marketing management where an internet component has been added to the business.

Design/methodology/approach

Cases were developed primarily from individual in‐depth interviews with 30 managers from financial services.

Findings

In setting up an e‐commerce capability the case study organizations have been taking strategic decisions on customer interaction. Aligning channels cost‐effectively with appropriate customers requires difficult decisions to be made in targeting and managing different customer segments. At the operational level many aspects of customer interaction can be handled centrally, moving the emphasis of customer management into customer service departments.

Research limitations/implications

The question of how best to manage customers effectively, using e‐service in an integrated manner with other channels, can be seen to be complex and requires further research in order to extend theory in this area and give more meaningful guidance to marketing practitioners.

Practical implications

The marketing function has the potential to play a prime role in ensuring that remote customer management is effective. Recommendations are made for practising managers on developing an integrated channel strategy; setting up processes for managing customer feedback from the new channels and responding to this feedback.

Originality/value

E‐service is throwing up new and fundamental challenges for organizations and this potentially provides new opportunities for marketing practitioners to play a leading role at strategic and operational levels. However, in the cases marketing management's strategic and operational contribution to resolving these issues was limited.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Tim Hughes

The UK financial services industry is changing rapidly, particularly as a result of developments in distribution, notably with e‐commerce. The aim of this study is to…

Abstract

The UK financial services industry is changing rapidly, particularly as a result of developments in distribution, notably with e‐commerce. The aim of this study is to apply the conceptual framework of market orientation to explain how a number of financial services companies are responding to this fundamental distribution change. The fieldwork consisted of multi respondent semi‐structured interviews conducted in four major UK financial services companies from December 1999 to August 2000. This paper puts forward some initial findings and observations from these interviews. E‐commerce is recognised by the great majority of respondents as being fundamentally important as a new way of providing information, purchasing certain products, automating transactions, providing self service and lowering costs. In the new standalone operation studied, the instant and centralised communication made possible by e‐commerce promotes the ability to respond to customer requirements in a way that corresponds to many aspects of the major market orientation models. However in trying to integrate e‐commerce with more traditional channels, in existing organisations, there are some major challenges to overcome.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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