Search results

1 – 10 of 93
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Tim H. Dodd

Many tourism related businesses give little consideration to influencing people to make repeat visits. Wineries are no exception. Management often spends too little time…

Abstract

Many tourism related businesses give little consideration to influencing people to make repeat visits. Wineries are no exception. Management often spends too little time and effort trying to satisfy the visitor and encourage them to return. However, repeat visitors are valuable because they typically spend more than first‐time tourists and pass along information to others. This paper examines the importance of bringing consumers back to a winery, and the information and spending implications of doing so.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Mark M. Gultek, Tim H. Dodd and Raymond M. Guydosh

Restaurants represent a significant sales potential tor the wine industry and wineries attempt to develop this market in various ways. The two industries can effectively…

Abstract

Restaurants represent a significant sales potential tor the wine industry and wineries attempt to develop this market in various ways. The two industries can effectively complement each other through combining their efforts. Wine producers can benefit from direct selling to restaurants because the process of direct selling can help wineries, especially newly developing local wineries, promote their wines and establish brand recognition. This research explores restaurateurs' attitudes toward local wines based on the investigation of the wine product attributes and types of restaurants that offer better opportunities for local wines. Findings indicated that attitudes of restaurateurs have a significant impact on purchases of local wine. Independently owned restaurants were also found to provide better opportunities for local wineries.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 November 2008

Natalia Kolyesnikova, Tim H. Dodd and Dale F. Duhan

The current study is an initial attempt to segment the wine market in an emerging region and examine local residents’ attitudes towards local wines.

Downloads
1923

Abstract

Purpose

The current study is an initial attempt to segment the wine market in an emerging region and examine local residents’ attitudes towards local wines.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted using data collected from US households through a telephone survey. Consumer attitudes towards local wines were operationalized through assessment of local wines; recommendation of local wines to others; and rating of quality of local wines. The K‐means clustering algorithm was applied to classify the respondents into clusters.

Findings

The developing wine market was segmented into four clusters: “local enthusiasts”, “local detractors”, “local advocates” and “local non‐advocates”. Socio‐demographic and wine consumption profiles for each segment are developed. Of particular interest was the difference in recommendation behavior between two of groups of consumers with similar relatively high‐quality ratings and assessments of the local wines. Despite the similarity in attitudes, local advocates are willing to recommend the regional wines to other people, whereas non‐advocates would not recommend them.

Practical implications

By better understanding how information is transferred from one person to the next will assist marketers in their efforts to establish new products or introduce new brands or regional wines.

Originality/value

The market segmentation approach taken in this study is based on local residents’ attitudes towards local wines. The study sets the starting point in investigating new markets consumer characteristics and reasons for their behavior. Of particular interest for future research is consumer recommendation behavior.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Tim H. Dodd

Although there are some drawbacks, winery tourism offers some significant benefits for wineries which are struggling for recognition. These benefits include the…

Downloads
1255

Abstract

Although there are some drawbacks, winery tourism offers some significant benefits for wineries which are struggling for recognition. These benefits include the opportunity to build brand loyalty, the chance for consumers to try products with a reduced level of risk, increased margins, and marketing intelligence opportunities. A study of Texas wineries found that winery visitors tend to have high incomes and are highly educated. The attributes most important to these visitors are the taste of the wine, overall quality, the cleanliness of the winery and several factors associated with the service that is provided. Implications for managers, and future research directions are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Jay R. Schrock, Charlie R. Adams, Joel D. Nicholson and Tim H. Dodd

The purpose of this article is to study the export strategies used by the Argentina wine industry. The implementation of export strategies is related to the comparative…

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to study the export strategies used by the Argentina wine industry. The implementation of export strategies is related to the comparative advantages that Argentina has in wine‐making and wine‐exporting. Using the concept of competitive advantage, the authors found that Argentina has benefited from a low cost of production and several other strengths to develop a strong wine industry. To develop further they must minimise their weaknesses and capitalise on current opportunities.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Natalia Kolyesnikova, Tim H. Dodd and Debra A. Laverie

Wine and accessories bought partly or fully out of a perceived need to repay services received at a winery are defined here as gratuity purchasing. The purpose of the…

Downloads
1530

Abstract

Purpose

Wine and accessories bought partly or fully out of a perceived need to repay services received at a winery are defined here as gratuity purchasing. The purpose of the research is to identify factors that predict gratuity purchasing at wineries. Specifically, the study seeks to investigate the role of gratitude and obligation, along with other consumer characteristics, in purchasing.

Design/methodology/approach

Winery visitors were sampled from six Texas wineries. A total of 357 questionnaires were analyzed. Hierarchical multiple regression, correlation and factor analyses were employed.

Findings

Gratitude and obligation were found to be strong predictors of purchasing at wineries. Visitors who feel grateful to personnel and/or obliged to buy wine are likely to spend more money at wineries. Involvement and knowledge also appear to be related to purchasing.

Practical implications

Since gratitude and obligation appear to be strong predictors of buying decisions, winery managers need to find ways to enhance visitor feelings of appreciation. Although developing a sense of obligation may have an impact on sales, obligation may also create feelings of not wishing to return. It is important for managers to consider the extent to which they would like to have people feeling obligated or guilty about making a purchase.

Originality/value

The research offers new insights into an understudied area of consumer behavior – the role of reciprocity in purchasing behavior. An innovative feature of this study is the development of a new instrument to measure gratitude and obligation.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2009

Natalia Kolyesnikova, Tim H. Dodd and James B. Wilcox

The purpose of this paper is to show how purchasing behavior is approached as a customer‐perceived need to reciprocate for services received. The study seeks to examine…

Downloads
8987

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how purchasing behavior is approached as a customer‐perceived need to reciprocate for services received. The study seeks to examine involvement, knowledge, and identity as predictors of reciprocal consumer behavior. Two components of reciprocity – gratitude and obligation – are expected to mediate the relationships. The effect is expected to be different for men and women.

Design/methodology/approach

Wine was chosen as a product category to test the relationships in the models. Data collection was conducted via distribution of surveys to tasting room visitors at six wineries. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The impact of knowledge, identity, and involvement were important findings from the research. The differences between males and females with regard to their feelings of gratitude and obligation and the impact on purchasing are pronounced. Obligation to make a purchase had a stronger effect on the purchasing behavior of women. In contrast, gratitude (feeling appreciation and thankfulness to personnel) was a stronger reason for men to make a purchase.

Practical implications

Knowledge about different ways in which men and women reciprocate could be useful for researchers and practitioners. Free samples provided to potential buyers, tours of industrial factories where products are also sold, and a variety of service situations are all possible contexts where gratitude and obligation may occur. Purchases are likely to be the result at least in part because of these feelings.

Originality/value

The major contribution of this research is to highlight the role of gender in reciprocity research and to demonstrate the application of this effect in consumer behavior.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 August 2008

James B. Wilcox, Debbie A. Laverie, Natalia Kolyesnikova, Dale F. Duhan and Tim H. Dodd

The purpose of this paper is to explore how brand equity influences brand survival in the wine industry. Specifically, the aim is to investigate the influence of two key…

Downloads
3743

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how brand equity influences brand survival in the wine industry. Specifically, the aim is to investigate the influence of two key facets of brand equity (brand awareness and perceived quality) on brand survival.

Design/methodology/approach

Two types of data were used: consumer survey data and longitudinal data on brand survival over a 16‐year period. Perceptions of quality and brand recognition data were collected via survey at the beginning of the time frame (1991), longitudinal data regarding the brand survival were obtained for the years through 2006 and survey data were again collected in 2006. Twenty‐seven brands from wineries of a specific region were used for the study. Brand survival (measured in years) was analyzed using logistic regression with brand recognition and perceived quality as the predictors.

Findings

A slightly positive relationship between consumer ratings of perceived quality and the probability of brand survival was found. However, a strong positive relationship was found between brand recognition and probability of brand survival.

Originality/value

The results offer insights into long‐term brand management and what marketers can do over time to reinforce brand equity and brand survival. Specifically, brand awareness is a better predictor of brand survival than perceived quality for these emerging brands.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Ulrich R. Orth, Marianne McGarry Wolf and Tim H. Dodd

The purpose of the study is to identify dimensions of wine equity in terms of benefits sought by consumers in wine.

Downloads
5472

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to identify dimensions of wine equity in terms of benefits sought by consumers in wine.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines dimensions of wine region equity, measured in terms of benefits sought by consumers in wine. A survey was conducted in several US states to identify drivers of preferences and to determine relationships that may exist between those drivers, preferences for wine from a number of origins, and consumer lifestyles.

Findings

The findings suggest that wine region equity originates in six consumer motivational factors. Quality, price, social acceptance, emotional, environmental value, and humane value were found to be strong and significant predictors of consumer preferences for wine from three US states (California, Oregon, Washington) and six countries (Australia, Chile, France, Italy, New Zealand, Spain). Linking those dimensions of region equity to consumer lifestyle, demographic and behavioral variables allows for tailoring marketing communications strategies closely to markets.

Originality/value

Practical applications of this study extend beyond the wine industry and include generalizations for the identification of markets and market segments that react more favorably to specific origins, the identification of equity dimensions to be included in regional umbrella brands, and the identification of lifestyle‐based persuasive communication means and executional cues for specifically targeting selected audiences.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Natalia Velikova, Steve Charters, Tatiana Bouzdine-Chameeva, Joanna Fountain, Caroline Ritchie and Tim H. Dodd

– This paper aims to examine consumer preferences and perceptions of rosé wine with an ultimate purpose of constructing a perceived image of rosé in the cross-cultural context.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine consumer preferences and perceptions of rosé wine with an ultimate purpose of constructing a perceived image of rosé in the cross-cultural context.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted in four markets, comprising the USA, New Zealand, France and the UK. The data were collected via a structured questionnaire through a combination of survey administration modes (pen-and-paper and online). Descriptive statistics, chi-square, factor analysis and ANOVA were used for analysis.

Findings

One of the key findings revolves around the construction of the perceived image of rosé and how this image varies in different markets. Effectively, this study presents an overview of the perceived reputation of rosé in four different market structures, shaped by different cultural and image management issues.

Practical implications

The most crucial implication of this research is the cultural variation in consumer attitudes toward rosé wine and its impact on marketing strategies to effectively target rosé consumers in different markets.

Originality/value

The vast majority of studies on wine consumer behaviour focus on red or white wines, whereas research on consumption of rosé is virtually non-existent. However, recent market trends indicate a growing popularity of rosé wine around the world. The current study is the first to concentrate on rosé as the focal point of research investigation. The study not only offers insights on the perceived image of rosé based on empirical data, but also provides a broader cross-cultural perspective on how this image varies in different markets.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

1 – 10 of 93