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Article

Sabrina Neeley and Tim Coffey

Reports research on Generation X and Generation Y mothers and shows how today’s US mothers differ from those of past generations, such as in being more family oriented and…

Abstract

Reports research on Generation X and Generation Y mothers and shows how today’s US mothers differ from those of past generations, such as in being more family oriented and ethnically diverse; mothers are vital to marketers as they tend to “hold the purse‐strings”. Arranges mothers on a continuum of six categories, varying from the most permissive to the most restrictive in parenting style, and argues that children’s marketing needs to address the 58% of mothers who are restrictive. Points out that the central two categories, which include both “permissive” mothers who are responsive to their children’s requests and “restrictive” mothers who are concerned about the objective value of products, constitute almost half the total and are therefore vital for advertising messages.

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Young Consumers, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article

Carol Mutch

Qualitative data analysis requires methodological knowledge and intellectual competence. Analysis is not about adhering to any one correct approach or set of right…

Abstract

Qualitative data analysis requires methodological knowledge and intellectual competence. Analysis is not about adhering to any one correct approach or set of right techniques; it is imaginative, artful, flexible, and reflexive. It should also be methodical, scholarly, and intellectually rigorous. (Coffey and Atkinson, 1996, p.1.

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Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Article

Zachary A. Schaefer and Owen H. Lynch

The authors use concepts from the “communication constitutes organizations” (CCO) literature in combination with Cooren’s (2010, 2012) ventriloquism to demonstrate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors use concepts from the “communication constitutes organizations” (CCO) literature in combination with Cooren’s (2010, 2012) ventriloquism to demonstrate the symbolic uses of texts and shifting interpretations of authority during a negotiation regarding the future of a nonprofit educational institution. The two sides negotiating over how to resolve a fiscal crisis struggled to achieve legitimacy through competing institutional logics, and this paper captures this process through a detailed account. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study emerged from a multi-year full immersion ethnography undertaken by the second author, who spent over 5,000 hours as a participant observer at the organization. The quotes and observations come form field notes taken during this time.

Findings

Communication constitutes the nonprofit institution through two communication flows – self-structuring processes and institutional positioning – and these flows symbolically and materially unified the opposing negotiation parties during the negotiation process as each side struggled to gain legitimacy through competing institutional logics. The process of ventriloquism was the mechanism through which different actors and texts negotiated their levels of authority.

Practical implications

This case demonstrates how oppositional groups used and viewed texts throughout a negotiation process, revealing the agency, authority, legitimacy, and symbolic power of texts. This case also highlights the political struggle between institutional logics backed by financial models and professional logics backed by traditional organizational values.

Originality/value

At a material level, this case is a detailed examination of organizational members navigating the negotiation process during a fiscal crisis, but on a symbolic level this case demonstrates the communicative means through which oppositional groups negotiate core organizational values, and whether past values can lead organizations to a sustainable future. The observational depth of this case study was only possible through long term, full immersion ethnography, and this depth provides clarity to abstract concepts from CCO, ventriloquism, and institutional theory.

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Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Book part

William R. Meek

The decision of whether or not to start a new business is a question pondered by many people and something that about .004% of the U.S. population decides to do every…

Abstract

The decision of whether or not to start a new business is a question pondered by many people and something that about .004% of the U.S. population decides to do every month (Kauffman Foundation, 2005). This decision becomes more complicated with the involvement of family members. One would be hard pressed to find any business enterprise without some sort of family influence and involvement at some point in the start-up or ongoing operations of the business. While most entrepreneurship research points to legal, environmental, regulatory, technological, or demographic changes as triggers that spur individuals into action, the role of family influence in new business founding is often overshadowed or not addressed at all (Aldrich & Cliff, 2003).

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Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

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Service-Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-185-8

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Article

Alexander Johnstone, Tim Duffy and Colin Martin

Buprenorphine (Subutex) was piloted in two Scottish prisons between 2004 and 2006 and consequently used within other penal establishments in Scotland. This 2007…

Abstract

Purpose

Buprenorphine (Subutex) was piloted in two Scottish prisons between 2004 and 2006 and consequently used within other penal establishments in Scotland. This 2007 qualitative study aimed to explore the use of Subutex and its associated effects on 14 participants on detoxification programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

All participants were male, aged from 21 to 44 years with prison sentences ranging from a few months to life imprisonment. Buprenorphine was unavailable to female prisoners at the time of this study. Participants were recruited from seven Scottish prisons. All 14 participants were on detoxification programmes, each was prescribed Subutex, and each was selected from a larger investigation that included both those undergoing detoxification and maintenance (n=21). All participants had previously also used methadone on previous detoxification programmes.

Findings

It can be concluded that the majority of detoxification participants within this study indicated that Subutex was a more effective treatment than methadone as it helped reduce craving, eased the process of withdrawal and improved sleeping patterns. In addition, the majority of participants noted higher levels of motivation and the ability to set goals towards obtaining an improved quality of life.

Originality/value

This study provides an alternative perspective to the use of Subutex within prison settings, when compared with results from previous quantitative studies reported. The study also highlights inconsistencies drawn from studies in this area, which may be an artefact of study design. It is recommended that further qualitative studies be conducted to explore further this alternative perspective. Finally, the issue of methodological approach taken should be addressed within the context of a related, but independent, research forum.

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International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article

David Morris, Tim Donnelly and Tom Donnelly

The auto industry has undergone substantial structural and other change in the last 20 years. The influences of globalisation, implementation of lean production and the…

Abstract

The auto industry has undergone substantial structural and other change in the last 20 years. The influences of globalisation, implementation of lean production and the development of modularisation have had profound influences on the relationships between automobile assemblers (OEMs) and their suppliers, in particular those in the first tier. In the age of e‐business and global outsourcing the development of supplier parks could be argued to be surprising. This paper briefly outlines the development of supplier parks as part of the auto industry supply chain and offers some potential theoretical perspectives on why they have emerged.

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Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Abstract

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The Emerald Handbook of Blockchain for Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-198-1

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Book part

Roxana Gutiérrez-Romero and Luciana Méndez-Errico

This chapter assesses the extent to which historical levels of inequality affect the creation and survival of businesses over time. To this end, we use the Global…

Abstract

This chapter assesses the extent to which historical levels of inequality affect the creation and survival of businesses over time. To this end, we use the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor survey across 66 countries over 2005–2011. We complement this survey with data on income inequality dating back to early 1800s and current institutional environment, such as the number of procedures to start a new business, countries’ degree of financial inclusion, corruption and political stability. We find that, although inequality increases the number of firms created out of need, inequality reduces entrepreneurial activity as in net terms businesses are less likely to be created and survive over time. These findings are robust in using different measures of inequality across different points in time and regions, even if excluding Latin America, the most unequal region in the world. Our evidence then supports theories that argue early conditions, crucially inequality, influence development path.

Details

Research on Economic Inequality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-521-4

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