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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2009

Victoria Tischler, Emma Bronjewski, Katherine O'Connor and Tim Calton

We report the findings from a study exploring the experiences of individuals undergoing MRI scanning for research. Semi‐structured interviews took place before and after…

Abstract

We report the findings from a study exploring the experiences of individuals undergoing MRI scanning for research. Semi‐structured interviews took place before and after scanning with 17 participants; 12 were healthy volunteers and five were patients with a diagnosis of remitted depression. Themes of apprehension and curiosity prior to scanning were common in both groups. Patients were often confused about the procedure. Negative feelings were an issue at the outset, characterised by shock related to the physical surroundings, after which positive feelings, for example relaxation, were often experienced, and in the case of patients, learning more about their brain. Written information about imaging was deemed satisfactory; however the ability to ‘experience’ aspects of scanning beforehand was suggested. Scanning may be viewed as a process beginning prior to the procedure itself and involving positive and negative emotions. Increased information, reassurance and a more interactive intervention to reduce anxiety may be beneficial and may improve individuals' experience of this widely used procedure.

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Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Karen D'Silva, Tim Calton and Conor Duggan

We conducted a pilot study to investigate the impact of a single day's training, the purpose of which was to disseminate good practice, by asking delegates to complete a…

Abstract

We conducted a pilot study to investigate the impact of a single day's training, the purpose of which was to disseminate good practice, by asking delegates to complete a questionnaire, six months after attending the day. The completion rate was 56%. Our results suggested only a modest effect on practice, 54% of respondents reporting a change in at least one of the five domains of practice asked about. The question arises of whether this type of training is the most effective way of disseminating good practice.

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

David Crighton and Graham Towl

Abstract

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

W.J. Penson

The purpose of this paper is to critically discuss how the psy-sciences have been, and continue to be, typified by some critics, as colonizers and are credited with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically discuss how the psy-sciences have been, and continue to be, typified by some critics, as colonizers and are credited with Imperialistic motivations. However, rarely are these critiques developed beyond a pejorative characterisation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the criticisms of psychiatry as colonial and outlines the tensions in taking different frames of reference in the mental health field, before going on to suggest theoretical and research perspectives arising from postcolonial theory that might advance these critical positions more coherently and the implications of doing so.

Findings

This study suggests an engagement with humanities-based methods and fields such as postcolonial scholarship.

Social implications

This argument is timely, especially given recent controversies over the publication of DSM5, the scaling up agenda for mental health in the Global South and increased attention to the agenda of Big Pharma.

Originality/value

Postcolonial intersections with psy-science remains a relatively undeveloped area in the critical literature.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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