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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2012

Alexander Staus and Tilman Becker

This paper aims to investigate the satisfaction of dealers with their suppliers in the agricultural machinery sector.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the satisfaction of dealers with their suppliers in the agricultural machinery sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A dummy approach of the three‐factor model is used to detect the dimensions that influence the overall satisfaction of agricultural machinery dealers. The model considers satisfiers, dissatisfiers and so‐called performance factors that might lead to both satisfaction and dissatisfaction.

Findings

Two dissatisfiers, after‐sales and service methods and relationship with supplier, are detected. Furthermore, there is one satisfier, competitive outlook, and one performance factor, the product program.

Research limitations/implications

The dummy approach detects the three factors implicitly. A Kano‐questionnaire might be helpful to confirm the results.

Practical implications

Producers should first fulfill the factors that have the highest negative impact: product program, followed by after‐sales and service methods and relationship with supplier. After reaching a specific level within these factors, producers could seek to increase their dealers' satisfaction with the two factors, product program and competitive outlook. The product program thus represents the key factor for producers seeking to both decrease dissatisfaction and increase satisfaction.

Originality/value

While different approaches of the three‐factor model are used along with customer satisfaction, this paper is the first to detect different factors of dealer satisfaction in the agricultural machinery sector.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Dilip Babasaheb Kajale and Tilman C. Becker

The aim of this paper is to understand young consumers' (students') opinions about the mandatory labeling policy for genetically modified foods (GMF), and in-depth…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to understand young consumers' (students') opinions about the mandatory labeling policy for genetically modified foods (GMF), and in-depth analysis of determinants of young consumer support for this policy.

Design/methodology/approach

Consumer survey was conducted by using a face to face interview method for a sample of 298 students. The hypotheses of this study are risk benefit perceptions and concerns about the current labeling policy likely to determine students' support for mandatory labeling of GMF. The questionnaire employed for the survey mainly focuses on the questions such as students' perceptions about GMF and opinions about current labeling policy in India. Probit model was used to analyze the determinants of young consumers' support for this policy.

Findings

The authors found that 58 per cent of the students support mandatory labeling of GMF and 39 per cent of the students are willing to pay 10-15 per cent more price for foods under this policy. Young consumers who have knowledge about GM technology are more likely to support this policy. Young consumers' dissatisfaction with the current labeling, and demand for information about food production have a positive influence on support for this policy. Those young consumers who use food labels regularly are likely to support this policy and young consumers' trust in university for truthful information about GMF has a positive influence. Whereas, students' risk benefits perception and moral concerns about GMF have an insignificant influence.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study are that it focused only on university students and used small sample size. Hence, further studies are recommended for overall consumer representative sample.

Practical implications

The findings of this study will be helpful for further research on consumers and mandatory labeling of GMF in India, and also provide some useful information for marketing of GMF in India.

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge this is the first study that analyzes the determinants of young consumers' support for mandatory labeling policy for GMF in India.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Tilman Becker, Eckhard Benner and Kristina Glitsch

In this article, the results of a consumer survey for Germany are presented. Extrinsic cues play an important role for quality selection in the shop. Here “country of…

Abstract

In this article, the results of a consumer survey for Germany are presented. Extrinsic cues play an important role for quality selection in the shop. Here “country of origin” and “place of purchase” play a dominant role. To judge the eating quality of fresh meat, those experience quality attribute cues, which are hard to measure with characteristics, like flavour or smell, seem to be the most important. For assessing the safety of meat, “country of origin” as an extrinsic credence quality attribute cue and “freshness” as an intrinsic credence quality attribute cue are of most importance. “Country of origin” is used by consumers not only to predict eating quality but also to indicate safety. This holds not only for beef, but also for pork and, to a lesser extent, chicken. The most trusted source of information on the safety of meat is the butcher.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Tilman Becker

A model for analysis of consumer behaviour towards food is developed. This model is intended to bridge the gap between the objective quality approach pursued in food…

Abstract

A model for analysis of consumer behaviour towards food is developed. This model is intended to bridge the gap between the objective quality approach pursued in food sciences, the product characteristics approach, and the subjectively perceived quality approach, the product attribute approach as pursued in the consumer behaviour literature. The focus is on the information processing by the consumer. Information on the product quality is supplied to the consumer in the form of cues received while shopping or consuming. A distinction is made between extrinsic and intrinsic cues, and between search‐, experience‐, and credence‐quality attributes. Within the credence attributes, three categories are distinguished: food safety, health, and all other credence quality attributes. It is demonstrated that public policy should use minimum standards for regulating food safety, information and consumer education on health issues and definitional standards to regulate the other credence qualities. In the case of search quality, no public intervention is needed. In the case of experience quality, reputation is a means of reducing the quality erosion inherent for experience quality attributes. In the case of those foods which are not sold prepacked over the counter, these means are restricted. Here the public regulators could consider backing up the private quality policy efforts on labelling by implementing traceability schemes and defining the requirements for specific label claims.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2018

Gyan Prakash

The purpose of this paper is to understand the meaning and operationalization of food supply chains in the context of the UK and India.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the meaning and operationalization of food supply chains in the context of the UK and India.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper follows the systematic literature review approach. The paper examines 99 articles published in peer-reviewed-journals from 1995 to 2017.

Findings

Findings reveal that food supply chain literature is explored along themes of procurement, food processing, innovation, traceability, safety, environment and sustainability, food policy, quality, health, consumer behavior and packaging. Within these themes, the UK researchers have primarily addressed vertical integration, coordination, safety, competitiveness and transparency and information technology. Indian researchers have focused on issues such as consumer perceptions, retail format choice, organic, health and wellness products. An empirical category is the most popular approach. The survey method is the most popular approach followed by the single case studies.

Research limitations/implications

The paper contributes to the body of knowledge by presenting a unified synthesis of articles dealing with the food supply chain in the bilateral context of the UK and India.

Practical implications

The policy makers could use findings for conceptualization of complementarities and possible food supply chain networks.

Social implications

Food processing activities may have potential to provide sustaining livelihoods to around sixty percent of the Indian population which depends on the agriculture. In the bilateral context, the UK may also get a reliable and cost competitive partner to meet its food import needs. This will help the UK to focus more on its service-led economy which, in turn, may create more jobs.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the contextual issues of both the countries and presents opportunities for future collaboration.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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Book part
Publication date: 21 June 2014

Tilman Brück, Olaf J. de Groot and Neil T. N. Ferguson

The purpose of this study is to define the interactions that determine how secure a society is from terrorism and to propose a method for measuring the threat of terrorism…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to define the interactions that determine how secure a society is from terrorism and to propose a method for measuring the threat of terrorism in an objective and spatio-temporally comparable manner.

Methodology/approach

Game-theoretic analysis of the determinants of security and discussion of how to implement these interactions into a measure of security.

Findings

We show that governments concerned with popularity have an incentive to over-invest in security and that, in certain situations, this leads to a deterioration in net security position. Our discussion provides an implementable means for measuring the levels of threat and protection, as well as individuals’ perceptions of both, which we propose can be combined into an objective and scientific measure of security.

Research limitations/implications

The implication for researchers is the suggestion that efficiency, as well as scale of counter-terrorism, is important in determining a country’s overall security position. Furthermore, we suggest that individuals’ perceptions are at least as important in determining suitable counter-terrorism policy as objective measures of protection and threat. The limitations of this research are found in the vast data requirements that any attempt to measure security will need.

Originality/value of the chapter

We propose the first method for objectively measuring the net security position of a country, using economic and econometric means.

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2020

Joya A. Kemper and Paul W. Ballantine

This paper aims to explore how the socio-ecological model can be expanded to address wicked problems that are perpetuated by marketing systems through examining the ways…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how the socio-ecological model can be expanded to address wicked problems that are perpetuated by marketing systems through examining the ways the external environment can be targeted.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used an extended socio-ecological model to provide a framework for social marketers to combat climate change through the food system in the external environment.

Findings

The socio-ecological model is extended to examine how social marketers can influence the micro and macro environment through targeting the physical structure, economic, political and socio-cultural environment of desirable (sustainable) and undesirable (unsustainable) food products.

Practical implications

The authors highlight that social marketers should focus on the various ways the external environment at multiple levels can be targeted to produce systemic change.

Originality/value

This paper broadens the current macro-social marketing knowledge by providing a framework to analyse where and how change can be affected at the various levels of society.

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Book part
Publication date: 21 June 2014

Daniel Meierrieks

The purpose of this contribution is to review the theoretical and empirical literature on the economic determinants of terrorism.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this contribution is to review the theoretical and empirical literature on the economic determinants of terrorism.

Methodology/approach

Review of the relevant academic literature.

Findings

This contribution shows that there is a theoretical foundation to the popular hypothesis that poor economic conditions are conducive to terrorism. A review of the empirical evidence on the economic determinants of terrorism, however, yields an inconclusive result. Some studies find that economic conditions (directly and indirectly) matter to terrorism, whereas a plurality of studies suggest that noneconomic factors are more important.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the survey indicate that it is unlikely that economic conditions are universal determinants of terrorism. By pointing at several avenues of future research (e.g., a focus on the role of ideology in terrorism), this contribution, however, argues that the opposite also does not need to be true. The influence of economic factors on terrorism should neither be overemphasized nor completely ruled out.

Originality/value of chapter

The contribution offers a comprehensive overview of the economy–terrorism nexus and hints at promising areas of future research.

Details

Understanding Terrorism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-828-0

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Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2007

Luciano Andreozzi and Marina Bianchi

One of the many paradoxes of fashions is that consumers’ choices change rapidly and with an astonishing degree of synchronization. What is successful or socially…

Abstract

One of the many paradoxes of fashions is that consumers’ choices change rapidly and with an astonishing degree of synchronization. What is successful or socially acceptable in one period is considered the opposite in the next. This paradox has brought economists and other social scientists to conceive of fashions and fads as one of many forms of irrational behavior. Herd behavior and weakness of will, a desire to conform or, conversely, to distinguish oneself, have all been invoked to explain the rapid evolution of modes of behavior that emerge and more or less suddenly disappear. In this paper we try to show that fashions, even if fragile and transient, might nonetheless be rational. It is a rationality, however, that has to include something overlooked in most economic writing: the desire for novelty and variety. In fashions this desire takes the form of coordinated behavior that both facilitates consumption and destroys its novel content, thus paving the way for new fashions to appear.

Details

The Evolution of Consumption: Theories and Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1452-2

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2010

Markus Vinnari, Pekka Mustonen and Pekka Räsänen

The paper aims to examine changes in household consumption behaviour through an empirical investigation of the decision to consume meat, to not consume meat or to consume…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine changes in household consumption behaviour through an empirical investigation of the decision to consume meat, to not consume meat or to consume only small amounts of meat. The goal is to find out if the decision not to consume meat is becoming more prevalent, and to understand in what social categories this is happening, if any. A further aim is to investigate whether meat consumption is strongly associated with gender on the household level.

Design/methodology/approach

Expenditure survey data gathered from Finland during the last 40 years was used to identify what kinds of changes were taking place in the consumption of meat and meat products. The independent measures include six variables: the gender of the highest earner in the household (HEH), the type of household, the type of municipality and the income quintile, educational level and age of the HEH. The size of the samples varied between 2,986 and 8,258 households.

Findings

The analysis revealed that the decision not to consume meat became prevalent in Finland at the end of the 1970s but the growth rate has somewhat stabilised during recent decades. The gender of the HEH affects the family meat consumption. As non‐meat consumption has become more widespread it has also more clearly become a middle‐class phenomenon.

Originality/value

There are no previous studies available on the development of non‐meat consumption from this long‐term perspective.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 112 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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