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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2020

Maria Järlström, Tiina Brandt and Anni Rajala

This study aims to advance a holistic and integrated view to understand the relationship between career capital and career success among knowledge workers.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to advance a holistic and integrated view to understand the relationship between career capital and career success among knowledge workers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study examines the associations of three forms of career capital – human, social and psychological capital – on career success. Career success is measured through a subjective evaluation of career satisfaction and an objective evaluation of promotion. The data are drawn from 624 knowledge workers from Finland with an academic degree in business studies. The model is tested through structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results stress the importance of psychological capital as an important career resource among knowledge workers. Therefore, our findings contribute to career research by supporting the argument that context and/or occupational group matters in the relationship between career capital and career success.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional data partly restrict our ability to delimit an impact. Further research using a longitudinal design would be required to confirm longitudinal effects. The respondents were a relatively homogeneous group of knowledge workers, and thus, the results are not generalized to other samples. The Finnish context (e.g., a high-quality education system, welfare society, dual-earner model) may also include special aspects that may have an effect on results limiting generalization to different contexts rather than Nordic ones.

Practical implications

Career capital is an important element of taking charge of one's career, which is expected in current working life scenarios. Given psychological capital has an impact on employees' career success, employees' psychological capital could be supported in organizations to help them to adapt to career changes. Employers benefit from individuals who are willing to invest in their work, and therefore, the employers should be aware of the individual factors that affect employees' career success.

Social implications

The meaning of career success may be context and culture related, as might its predictors. Hence, perceived career success may benefit and spill over to several stakeholders such as employers, family members and friends through its effects of positive energy and well-being. Career counselors could place more emphasis than currently on developing the psychological capital of their clients. The findings are important for other practitioners as well, such as human resource (HR) professionals who might consider dedicated programs fostering psychological capital qualities, which seem to relate to career success among knowledge workers.

Originality/value

A research model that considers career capital as an integrated entity is presented rather than focusing on a single form of career capital. Contextual issues were included by focusing on knowledge workers who represent careerists in a welfare society. These findings could advance career theory and provide developmental guidelines to help employers, HR and career-oriented individuals to build successful careers.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Piia Uusi-Kakkuri, Tiina Brandt and Susanna Kultalahti

The purpose of this paper is to investigate what kind of leadership young innovative people prefer and whether their level of innovativeness has an influence on those…

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1523

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate what kind of leadership young innovative people prefer and whether their level of innovativeness has an influence on those leadership preferences. It also asks specifically whether some leadership behaviours are preferred over others by young innovators, by comparing that group’s preferences to those of the majority of young people and an outlier group labelled laggards. Leadership preferences are studied in the context of transformational leadership covering transformational leadership, transactional leadership (including passive and active management by exception), rewarding, laissez-faire and authoritative leadership styles.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 297 Finnish university students completed a voluntary leadership behaviour questionnaire and an innovativeness scale. A non-parametric independent samples median test was run to determine if there were differences in the leadership preference score between the innovativeness level groups.

Findings

Results indicate that the level of innovativeness influences leadership preferences. Receiving intellectual stimulation from their leader is more important to young innovators than it is to their peers but the former are also less comfortable with active management by exception.

Originality/value

Young innovators leadership preferences have not been studied. Harnessing the full power of this important talent pool is central to the future competitiveness of organizations and nations. This study intends to prompt discussion and studies on how to lead young innovators given their preferences.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Tiina Maria Brandt and Piia Edinger

This study aims to investigate whether transformational leadership exists in teams, and if so, whether it is represented in a similar way as in more traditional leadership…

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6161

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate whether transformational leadership exists in teams, and if so, whether it is represented in a similar way as in more traditional leadership situations. The study also aims to determine whether a team leader’s sex has an influence on the relationship between personality and team leadership when team members evaluate the leader’s behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative analysis is conducted on input from 104 team leaders and 672 team members from a Finnish university. Data were collected during university courses, and the team leaders’ transformational leadership styles were evaluated by team members at the end of the courses.

Findings

The results indicate that the transformational leadership questionnaire is applicable when studying team leadership; the Visioning dimension might be absent, but Modelling, Enabling, Challenging and Rewarding dimensions represent transformational leadership in teams. Women tend to be more transformational team leaders than men. Personality seems to influence both sexes, so that extraverted and judging personality types are more transformational leaders than introverted and perceiving ones. In relation to sex, introverted, sensing, thinking and perceiving female leaders are regarded as more transformational than men with similar preferences. Additionally, some personality preferences seem to be sex-neutral in terms of team transformational leadership when rated by team members.

Originality/value

There is no previous study combining these variables in the academic team context.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Tiina Brandt and Maarit Laiho

There are many studies of personality and leadership and gender and leadership, but only few leadership studies have taken into account both personality and gender. That…

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11616

Abstract

Purpose

There are many studies of personality and leadership and gender and leadership, but only few leadership studies have taken into account both personality and gender. That may partly be due to the fact that there are relatively few female leaders, however, the aim of this paper is to discover if similar personality types exhibit the same kind of leadership behavior irrespective of gender.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative analysis involves 459 leaders (283 men and 176 women) and 378 subordinates working in various fields. Leaders rated their leadership behavior and subordinates also appraised them.

Findings

Results indicated differences in leadership behavior by gender, in that women exhibited more enabling behavior, and men more challenging behavior. Further, gender and personality had an impact on leadership behavior, as viewed by both leaders and subordinates. For example, extraverted and intuitive male leaders along with those exhibiting the perceiving dimension regarded themselves as more challenging than their introverted, sensing and judging male counterparts, a view confirmed by subordinates in the case of perceiving male leaders.

Research limitations/implications

As limitations, the Myers‐Briggs Type Indicator offers only one view of the personality, and future studies would be needed with different methods. Also the study did not control confounding factors, and it should be taken into account with the study.

Practical implications

From a practical view point, this study offers specific knowledge for people seeking to develop themselves as leaders.

Originality/value

Very few studies have concentrated on the relationship between personality and gender in the transformational leadership context, and this study provides a new perspective on this area.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Maarit Laiho and Tiina Brandt

The article aims to report the findings of quantitative and qualitative analysis of the benefits, drawbacks and future prospects of formal mentoring in medium‐sized and…

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2799

Abstract

Purpose

The article aims to report the findings of quantitative and qualitative analysis of the benefits, drawbacks and future prospects of formal mentoring in medium‐sized and large organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data for the study were collected via an online survey, and consist of responses from 152 human resource specialists from companies and public sector organisations in Finland.

Findings

The results reflect the organisations' current situation, and the issues that are important to the HR function. Mentoring is primarily used to transfer tacit knowledge from those near retirement to younger colleagues, foster the personnel development and create well‐being at work. Career advancement and work performance are not as important as might have been thought. The results suggest that mentoring will be more widely used in the future. Among the future potential deliverables of mentoring are strengthening competence management, creating well‐being and enhancing an organisation's image. Young people, in particular, may demand the use of social media alongside mentoring. This could also facilitate mentoring in multicultural organisations.

Practical implications

HR functions intending to make greater use of mentoring in future will require more focus and resources to do so. For example, almost one in five of the respondents saw a lack of information as a barrier to establishing mentoring.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on how organisations view mentoring, which has not been extensively examined previously.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Tiina Brandt, Erkki K Laitinen and Teija Laitinen

– The purpose of this study is to find the effect of transformational leadership in profitability in different contexts.

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1354

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to find the effect of transformational leadership in profitability in different contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are gathered of 200 Finnish firms. Profitability is measured by profitability ratios one to two years after the survey to take account of lagged effects. The sample is split into sub-samples with respect to four context variables indicated by prior research to be important for transformational leadership: size, competition, perceived environmental uncertainty (PEU) and research and development (R & D) effort. The effect of leadership dimensions on lagged profitability was assessed by partial least squares analysis.

Findings

Factor analysis gave a five-factor solution for transformational leadership variables indicating dimensions as: challenging, enabling, visioning, rewarding and contesting. Results did show that transformational leadership has a weak general effect on profitability. Results also offer some support for hypotheses for the strong effects of transformational leadership in different contexts. Enabling has an effect in low competition context; rewarding has an effect in low PEU, low competition and high R & D contexts; and contesting has an effect in large companies and in high PEU context.

Research limitations/implications

The commonly used Bass’ measurement of transformational leadership was not used here; instead, Kouzes and Posners’ modified version was in use. Factor analysis of this version resulted to the three factors only in a few loadings, even if high.

Practical implications

The importance of rewarding behavior of leaders is even stronger than previously thought. Thus, managers should concentrate more on the positive feedback of followers.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills a gap of research on leadership and profitability and also stresses the importance of situational variables which may affect the usefulness of different leadership styles.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2016

Adelina Broadbridge and Sharon Anne Mavin

Downloads
2703

Abstract

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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