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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Rohit Trivedi, Thorsten Teichert and Dirk Hardeck

Despite quick response (QR) codes’ prominence, little is known about their embedding in pull-based communications. This study aims to measure QR code effects in print…

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Abstract

Purpose

Despite quick response (QR) codes’ prominence, little is known about their embedding in pull-based communications. This study aims to measure QR code effects in print advertising along five different stages of consumer decision making, using advertisement appeals with moderating effects of product category involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were derived from a German market research initiative with 326,212 consumer evaluations for 792 real print advertisements from 26 product categories. Multinomial logit models were used to investigate the effects of QR code presence on consumer reactions.

Findings

QR codes steer purchase intention in a low-involvement product category if used alongside an emotional appeal. Advertisements for high-involvement products benefit if QR codes are combined with an overall informational appeal. QR codes do not enhance the persuasive effects of advertisements’ informational appeals in a low-involvement product category.

Research limitations/implications

The effects of QR codes on consumers’ responses cannot be analysed in isolation but depend on advertisement context. They interact with advertisements’ informational and emotional appeals and product category involvement.

Practical implications

Marketers should not use QR codes indiscriminately but should carefully consider advertisement context. QR codes should be used alongside an emotional appeal if the marketer’s objective is to induce purchase intention in low-involvement settings. Advertisements for high-involvement products need to combine QR codes with an informational appeal.

Originality/value

This study highlights the interplay of effects in print advertisements, which are typically considered push-based when they are combined with QR codes as pull-based communications in the digital marketing area.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Thorsten Teichert, Sajad Rezaei and Juan C. Correa

This study conceptualizes food delivery services as service mix decisions (SMDs) and illustrates a data-driven approach for the analysis of customers' written experiences.

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2225

Abstract

Purpose

This study conceptualizes food delivery services as service mix decisions (SMDs) and illustrates a data-driven approach for the analysis of customers' written experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

Web scraping, text mining techniques as well as multivariate statistics are combined to uncover the structure of the three tiers of SMD from consumers' point of view.

Findings

The analyses reveal that fast food delivery is not primarily about speed but that there are four distinct experiential factors to be considered for SMDs. Fast food delivery services are associated both with the actual product (i.e. product issues and brand satisfaction) and with the augmented product (payment process and service handling).

Originality/value

Findings demonstrate the relevance of SMDs in omnichannel food retail environments and guide researchers in multistage analyses of consumers' online food reviews.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Christiana Yosevina Tercia and Thorsten Teichert

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how monetary incentives foster purchase intention in WOM settings.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how monetary incentives foster purchase intention in WOM settings.

Design/methodology/approach

This study investigates offering mobile coupons as an incentive and word-of-mouth (WOM) tool. An empirical study compares achievable effects on WOM behavior in an Eastern cultural context, which an Indonesian sample represents, and in a Western cultural context, which a German sample of incentivized WOM represents.

Findings

Providing senders and receivers’ with differing incentives leads to German consumers having an unfavorable attitude toward such incentives, but not for Indonesian consumers. Furthermore, Indonesian consumers base their decision to redeem mobile coupons more on their personal judgment and their overall deal proneness, while German consumers rely on their personal judgment and on others’ opinion.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need to explore more countries to enrich the Western and Eastern cultural perspectives.

Practical implications

Western firms should consider providing senders and receivers with the same incentives. Alternatively, a non-transparent strategy might be a solution. For firms located in Indonesia, or in other Eastern societies, the transparency of the provided incentives is not a main concern, because inequality is not a big issue in an Eastern society, while senders’ or receivers’ deal proneness character strongly influences their intention to redeem a coupon.

Originality/value

The use of a mobile coupon as a novel incentive and WOM tool.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2019

Helen Duh and Teichert Thorsten

Young consumers globally are susceptible to becoming compulsive shoppers. Having negative consequences and considering that compulsive shopping may originate from past…

Abstract

Purpose

Young consumers globally are susceptible to becoming compulsive shoppers. Having negative consequences and considering that compulsive shopping may originate from past family life experiences, this study aims to use human capital life-course and positive-activity theories to suggest a socio-psychological pathway for prevention. It also examined the mediating influence of happiness and money attitude.

Design/methodology/approach

University students in South Africa (N = 171) and in Germany (N = 202) were surveyed. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to test relationships and multi-group analysis (MGA) assessed cross-cultural differences.

Findings

Emotional family resources received during childhood positively impacted happiness at young adulthood, which was found to be a positive driver of budget money attitude. Budget money attitude in turn limited compulsive shopping for German young consumers but not for South Africans. Cross-cultural differences are also observed in mediating effects of happiness and budget money attitude.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on self-reported data from university students; this might limit the generalisability of findings.

Social implications

A positive relationship between happiness and desirable money attitude was confirmed. This study additionally contributes by showing that for South African and German young consumers, adequate childhood emotional family resources is a happiness’ driver. This thus exposes the multiplier effects of simple acts of showing love and attention to children and how these family emotional resources can progressively limit dysfunctional consumer behaviour in the future.

Originality/value

Unlike complex psychotherapeutical and psychopharmacological treatments of compulsive buying that are being suggested, this study borrows from family, consumer and economic–psychological disciplines to suggest simple preventive measures.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 24 December 2020

Thorsten Teichert, Philipp Wörfel and Claire-Lise Ackermann

Snacking typically occurs as an automatic, consciously uncontrolled process which can lead to unintended health consequences. Grounded cognition informs about the…

Abstract

Purpose

Snacking typically occurs as an automatic, consciously uncontrolled process which can lead to unintended health consequences. Grounded cognition informs about the multifaceted drivers of such automatic consumption processes. By integrating situation-, stimulus-, and person-specific factors, this study provides a holistic account of snacking.

Design/methodology/approach

A combined psychophysiological and behavioral experiment is conducted wherein participants can casually snack chocolate while participating in a survey setting. Implicit cognitions are assessed with the Implicit Association Test. The percentage of consumed chocolate serves as dependent variable in a Tobit regression with predictors at situation, stimulus and person level.

Findings

Chocolate snacking is positively influenced by personal craving tendencies, implicit food associations and situational contingency. We condense the results into an overarching framework in line with grounded cognition literature.

Practical implications

The multidimensional framework can guide consumer protection efforts to reduce excessive snacking habits based on situation, stimulus and person.

Originality/value

This study integrates theory from social cognition, consumer research, and behavioral food research and, thereby, extends the existing body of knowledge on grounded cognitions underlying snacking consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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