Search results

1 – 10 of over 4000
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Jeremiah Clabough and Thomas Turner

Inquiry-based instruction in social studies began as a transformative movement whose proponents included Shirley Engle, Donald Oliver, and James Shaver in the middle of…

Abstract

Inquiry-based instruction in social studies began as a transformative movement whose proponents included Shirley Engle, Donald Oliver, and James Shaver in the middle of the twentieth-century. Inquiry-based instruction is relevant to twenty-first century social studies and is gaining even more importance in the age of the Internet. Six specific websites are presented that can be used for student inquiry and research primarily at the middle school level. We describe ways of utilizing these sites to drive student involvement and self-assessment while also presenting criteria for selecting additional websites to use in the classroom.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2017

Caroline Murphy and Thomas Turner

The undervaluing of care work, whether conducted informally or formally, has long been subject to debate. While much discussion, and indeed reform has centred on…

Abstract

Purpose

The undervaluing of care work, whether conducted informally or formally, has long been subject to debate. While much discussion, and indeed reform has centred on childcare, there is a growing need, particularly in countries with ageing populations, to examine how long-term care (LTC) work is valued. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the way in which employment policies (female labour market participation, retirement age, and precarious work) and social policies (care entitlements and benefits/leave for carers) affect both informal carers and formal care workers in a liberal welfare state with a rapidly ageing population.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing the adult worker model the authors use the existing literature on ageing care and employment to examine the approach of a liberal welfare state to care work focusing on both supports for informal carers and job quality in the formal care sector.

Findings

The research suggests that employment policies advocating increased labour participation, delaying retirement and treating informal care as a form of welfare are at odds with LTC strategies which encourage informal care. Furthermore, the latter policy acts to devalue formal care roles in an economic sense and potentially discourages workers from entering the formal care sector.

Originality/value

To date research investigating the interplay between employment and LTC policies has focused on either informal or formal care workers. In combining both aspects, we view informal and formal care workers as complementary, interdependent agents in the care process. This underlines the need to develop social policy regarding care and employment which encompasses the needs of each group concurrently.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 37 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Lorraine Ryan and Thomas Turner

Many familiar global corporations have well-developed corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies that enunciate socially caring values that include the dignity and…

Abstract

Purpose

Many familiar global corporations have well-developed corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies that enunciate socially caring values that include the dignity and well-being of their employees. Yet opposition to independent employee voice from companies with trumpeted CSR credentials indicates an uncomfortable contradiction between rhetoric and reality in the treatment of employees as valued stakeholders. The purpose of this paper is to explore these contradictions using the lens of a libertarian tradition.

Design/methodology/approach

The CSR statements of three companies are examined to provide the context for their espoused values towards employees. Media, trade union and academic publications on each of the companies are then considered to identify systematic evidence of anti-union practices.

Findings

The paper illustrates the paradox of companies with espoused CSR policies advocating the dignity and well-being of their employees with often explicit coercive anti-union practices. These practices are a constraint on the negative freedom/liberty of employees in the libertarian tradition and amount to unethical behaviour on the part of the firm.

Originality/value

The paper offers important insights into the disconnection common in many firms between normative ethical claims in CSR statements to treat employees as valued legitimate stakeholders and the reality in the workplace.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Thomas Turner and Christine Cross

The link between human resource practices and earnings for workers is a notable research lacuna and the purpose of this paper is to address this relationship using a…

Abstract

Purpose

The link between human resource practices and earnings for workers is a notable research lacuna and the purpose of this paper is to address this relationship using a matched data set covering all employees and employers in the Irish private sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on the National Employment Survey (NES) (2008). The survey provides measures of individual characteristics such as union membership, collective bargaining coverage, sector, occupation, age, sex and educational attainment. It also provides data on individual employee earnings including overtime and shift allowances, together with weekly hours worked. The particular benefit of the NES is that it is a large-scale matched employer-employee survey.

Findings

The results indicate that extensive use of high-involvement practices measured in this study is positively associated with higher earnings for both lower and higher earning employees. The authors also find that for employees covered by a collective agreement, the positive effects of high-involvement work practices are complementary with a union earnings premium.

Research limitations/implications

Some caution is required in the interpretation of the results given the cross-sectional nature of the data. With cross-sectional data it is difficult to establish definitive causal and directional linkages between high-involvement measures and levels of earnings and earnings inequality.

Practical implications

For trade unions and their members, the results imply that the involvement practices as measured in this study are unlikely to substitute for the earnings premium associated with collective bargaining coverage. For human resource, increasing the earnings of low-paid employees may carry relatively marginal costs but the benefits maybe considerable in the form of employee engagement, increased effort levels and productivity gains.

Originality/value

This study extends the literature on the outcomes of high-involvement practices for employees and firms by addressing their association with employee earnings particularly at the lower end of the wage hierarchy.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Thomas Turner and Daryl D’Art

Trends in union membership between 1990 and 2000 indicate the increasing feminization of the Irish trade union movement in terms of membership. The historical experience…

1092

Abstract

Trends in union membership between 1990 and 2000 indicate the increasing feminization of the Irish trade union movement in terms of membership. The historical experience in industrialised nations is for much of women’s work to be relatively short‐term and marginal to the main labour force. This, it has been suggested, has tended to discourage women workers from adopting a collectivist response to the issues of pay and conditions and so weakening their level of participation in union activities. However, the evidence from a survey of the membership in a general union revealed little difference in the attitudes of men and women in relation to levels of group solidarity, wage earner solidarity and union orientation. On the evidence of this paper there is no indication that the increasing feminization of the Irish trade union movement is having an adverse effect on union activism and solidarity.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 September 2011

Norma T. Mertz

Myra Gordon (2004) argues that “the real reason for a general failure to diversify lies in the culture and practices typically associated with faculty hiring” (p. 184)…

Abstract

Myra Gordon (2004) argues that “the real reason for a general failure to diversify lies in the culture and practices typically associated with faculty hiring” (p. 184). This chapter examines the faculty hiring process and how it contributes to the underrepresentation of female faculty of color and to what happens to them if they are hired. Drawing on the existing literature and insights from critical theory and signal theory, the dissection of the process considers how institutionalized norms characteristic of the dominant group in the academy (white, males) play a role in the exclusion (oppression) of nontraditional candidates, and signal their fit with those norms.

Details

Women of Color in Higher Education: Changing Directions and New Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-182-4

Book part
Publication date: 23 April 2013

Michael A. Katovich

This article provides rhetorical commentary to Ryan Turner’s arguments pertaining to animal self-hood. Turner’s assessments address one of the central lynchpins of Mead’s…

Abstract

This article provides rhetorical commentary to Ryan Turner’s arguments pertaining to animal self-hood. Turner’s assessments address one of the central lynchpins of Mead’s subordination of animals (and denial of animal selves), but he also presents a limited and selective review of Mead. In particular, in making his case for establishing the criteria for self-hood, Turner seems to ignore that temporal location, either in a static, individualistic, point-in-time, or more processual, social, and across time terms, becomes central to the question of animal selves. Turner also seems to minimize the extent to which animals can create complex coordination here and now, even employing dramaturgical sophistication as rotted in Goffman’s analysis of the self as performance. Despite his limited use of Mead and Goffman, however, Turner’s assessment of animal self-hood based on his criteria can stimulate interactionist inquiry into the similarities between animals and humans.

Details

40th Anniversary of Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-783-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1971

J. Waller

February 9,1971 Factory — Safety — Electricity regulations — Accident while working on fuse box — Live side of box not isolated — Usual practice — Duties of occupier and…

Abstract

February 9,1971 Factory — Safety — Electricity regulations — Accident while working on fuse box — Live side of box not isolated — Usual practice — Duties of occupier and workman under regulations — Electricity (Factories Acts) Regulations, 1908 (S.R. & O. 1908, No 1312), reg. 1

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Thomas Turner, Daryl D'Art and Michelle O'Sullivan

The paper's purpose is to examine the propensity of recent immigrants to join Irish trade unions compared to Irish workers.

1403

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's purpose is to examine the propensity of recent immigrants to join Irish trade unions compared to Irish workers.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on the 2005 Quarterly National Household Survey (QNHS), a quarterly survey carried out by the Central Statistics Office.

Findings

Results show that immigrant workers are less likely to join Irish trade unions than comparable native workers. Length of residency is an important factor in the likelihood of immigrants being unionised but employment in the public or private sector assumes even greater importance than nationality in determining union membership.

Research limitations/implications

While the QNHS is generally a robust representative sample survey of the population, errors may occur in the proportion of non‐Irish nationals surveyed due to difficulties of ensuring their inclusion in the sample population. Language may also be an obstacle, particularly for recently arrived immigrants.

Practical implications

From a trade union perspective the results highlight the need for trade unions to regularly conduct organising campaigns targeted at immigrants. Government policy aimed at integrating immigrants into the Irish labour force and ensuring adequate labour standards would be well served by ensuring greater union availability to immigrant workers.

Originality/value

The paper provides a profile and analysis of the extent to which immigrants are joining trade unions compared to Irish workers.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Thomas P. Loughman, Robin L. Snipes and Jennifer P. Pitts

The purpose of this paper is to examine factors that may contribute to physicians’ dissatisfaction with their work environment, and subsequently, their likelihood to…

1384

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine factors that may contribute to physicians’ dissatisfaction with their work environment, and subsequently, their likelihood to recommend a hospital to their peers.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method research design was used to identify, through qualitative interviews and focus groups, and measure, through quantitative surveys, physicians’ satisfaction with organizational communication, perceptions of empowerment and their likelihood to recommend a hospital to their peer physicians.

Findings

The results of the study indicate that physicians’ communication satisfaction and perceptions of empowerment contribute both directly and indirectly to their likelihood to recommend their organization to peers. The findings suggest that hospitals that facilitate positive workplace communications and provide work environments that allow professional discretion and autonomy are more likely to have satisfied physicians and positive word‐of‐mouth referrals.

Research limitations/implications

Although multiple methods of data collection were used to triangulate the findings, there is the potential of common‐method variance and response bias from the use of single source questionnaire data. Ideally, future studies would use longitudinal data and a more comprehensive model of antecedents and consequences of physician satisfaction.

Practical implications

By understanding sources of physician dissatisfaction, hospitals can develop appropriate interventions to minimize the adverse effects of dissatisfaction on costs, quality of care, and physician turnover.

Originality/value

This study focuses on physicians’ satisfaction with their hospital work environment, an often overlooked area in studies of the health care industry that more commonly center on patient–physician satisfaction. The current study's results provide suggestions for better hospital management and further insight into the challenges of improving physician satisfaction in the health care industry.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 4000