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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Timothy J. Fogarty, Larry M. Parker and Thomas Robinson

This paper argues that performance evaluation is a major element of preserving the status quo of gender differences in public accounting organizations. Performance…

Abstract

This paper argues that performance evaluation is a major element of preserving the status quo of gender differences in public accounting organizations. Performance evaluation is problematized as part of several broader themes in order to more fully appreciate its importance within careers and the gender patterning of organizations. Results of a study involving reactions to a hypothetical staff auditor in charge of an over‐budget audit engagement reveal significant gender differences. Implications for the gender neutrality of career management by large public accounting firms are drawn.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 13 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Richard E. Killblane

Abstract

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Delivering Victory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-603-5

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Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2016

Becky Malby and Murray Anderson-Wallace

Abstract

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Networks in Healthcare
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-283-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1976

Anthony Olden

DUBLIN DID NOT LACK literary talent in 1924. When Francis Stuart, his wife Iseult, and Cecil Salkeld decided to bring out a new periodical devoted to the arts, they found…

Abstract

DUBLIN DID NOT LACK literary talent in 1924. When Francis Stuart, his wife Iseult, and Cecil Salkeld decided to bring out a new periodical devoted to the arts, they found little difficulty collecting material. W. B. Yeats and Joseph Campbell contributed poems, Liam O'Flaherty a short story. Lennox Robinson—dramatist, director of the Abbey Theatre and secretary of the Carnegie United Kingdom Trust's Irish office—was too busy to write anything specially, but offered a story written years previously in New York, ‘The Madonna of Slieve Dun’. The first issue of To‐morrow: a New Irish Monthly (price sixpence) appeared in August. Within six months the Carnegie Trust's Irish Advisory Committee was suspended and Robinson, its secretary, dismissed.

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Library Review, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

Richard Burdett, Vicky Hulbert, Melanie Robinson, Mark Richardson, Harriet Shaw and Simon Will

This article focuses on the use of film and animation at the Thomas Hardye School in Dorset ‐ a comprehensive with 2216 on roll. It cites the development of the Films for…

Abstract

This article focuses on the use of film and animation at the Thomas Hardye School in Dorset ‐ a comprehensive with 2216 on roll. It cites the development of the Films for Learning (FFL) website as the driving force in the use of film and animation to promote and share learning. The article explores the various ways teachers and students have been using film and animation to help students with learning difficulties and includes:• how the English department have used film to improve listening and cooperation skills• how the ICT department have used screen capture software to help students with literacy difficulties• how the Education Extra department have used film to introduce a new course• how the Science department use film banks such as YouTube and National Geographic to help the lower ability students understand science topics• how the History department have made films with low ability students to help their understanding of historic periods.

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Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2015

Eugenio Díaz-Bonilla

This chapter places the discussion of trade and food security in a more general macroeconomic context.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter places the discussion of trade and food security in a more general macroeconomic context.

Methodology/approach

This chapter uses historical analysis to briefly trace the debate on economy-wide policies, starting with the 1943 United Nations (UN) Conference on Food and Agriculture that led to the creation of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in 1945. A general economic framework is used to organize the different channels through which macroeconomic policies may affect food and nutrition security.

Research implications

Examples of monetary, financial, fiscal, and exchange rate policies are presented, along with their implications for food and nutrition security.

Practical implications

The current debates about trade and food security must be placed in the context of the overall macroeconomic framework: a single trade policy may have different impacts depending on its interactions with other macroeconomic policies and structural factors.

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Food Security in an Uncertain World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-213-9

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Zeliha İlhan Ertuna and Eda Gurel

Entrepreneurial activities have a great impact on the economy and entrepreneurs are even more important for developing countries. Accordingly, the need for entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurial activities have a great impact on the economy and entrepreneurs are even more important for developing countries. Accordingly, the need for entrepreneurial graduates is increasing. Thus, this study aims to investigate the role of higher education with regard to the entrepreneurial intentions and traits of university students in Turkey.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered to freshmen and senior university students studying business and engineering at five established universities in Turkey, yielding a total sample of 767.

Findings

This logistic regression analysis indicates that some personality traits play an important role in influencing the students' intention to become entrepreneurs. The study findings also suggest that students with higher education have a higher intention of becoming entrepreneurs.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional method of data collection was used. However, longitudinal data from a bigger sample would have provided more valid support for the study.

Practical implications

The findings of this study have important implications for those who formulate, deliver and evaluate educational policy in Turkey. Based on the findings, policy makers may wish to review the current higher educational system and make changes to foster students' entrepreneurial mindset.

Originality/value

The study fills the gap in the literature by particularly testing the moderating effect of education between entrepreneurial traits and intentions.

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Education + Training, vol. 53 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1952

A review of the cases in which samples of food have been taken for analysis under Orders made under the Defence Regulations by the Ministry of Food gives rise to great…

Abstract

A review of the cases in which samples of food have been taken for analysis under Orders made under the Defence Regulations by the Ministry of Food gives rise to great concern, not only amongst the officers of Food and Drugs Authorities but amongst the trades concerned. A Food and Drugs Authority taking samples for analysis under Section 3 of the Food and Drugs Act, 1938, is generally required, should a contravention be shown by the Analyst's report, to take action within 28 days. Thus, in normal cases of contravention, justice is done expeditiously once the resolution of the Local Authority has been obtained. In this way, representative selections of food and drugs averaging three per thousand of the population is obtained throughout the year in accordance with the duties imposed on the Authority. Where, however, the Ministry of Food lay down standards under powers contained in the Defence Regulations, action for contravention of those standards cannot be taken by a Food and Drugs Authority but only by the Ministry. Thus, if milk does not reach the requisite standard of 3 per cent milk fat, a Local Authority can immediately take action, as the standard is fixed by the Food and Drugs Act, but, in the case of Channel Island milk for which the standard of 4 per cent is fixed under the Defence Regulations, Local Authorities are precluded from taking any action as this is the prerogative of the Ministry. In practice this means that, in the case of sausages, a Local Authority can prosecute for what they consider to be a deficiency in meat content without the approval of the Ministry of Food, but they cannot quote the standard laid down by them, except perhaps by submitting to the magistrates that this is the commercial standard. The Bench would then have to consider whether they should accept this commercial standard. The position which subsequently often occurs is that, whilst a set standard exists, only the Ministry can quote it. Any Local Authority so doing under Section 3 is likely to have its case dismissed. The Divisional Court case of Thomas Robinson & Sons Ltd. versus Allardice, 1944, illustrates this point. In that case, proceedings had been brought under Section 3 of the Food and Drugs Act, 1938, for the sale of food not of the nature or not of the substance or not of the quality demanded by the purchaser, in that it did not consist of a particular product defined by an Order made under the Defence Regulations 55. In this case Lawrence J said: “We find reliance, placed upon an alleged breach of the Starch Food Powders (Control) Order, 1941. That has nothing whatever to do with the Food and Drugs Act, and may well have been sumptuary legislation for the conservation of wheat; therefore it is obvious that the justices on their own showing took into consideration something irrelevant.” In consequence, it would appear that the object of the Order must be considered before deciding that it is within the scope of a Food and Drugs Authority's duty to proceed for a breach thereof. It seems that, where a temporary standard has been fixed to meet a crisis or a seasonal situation, the Local Authority has no power to rely upon such a standard when prosecuting under Section 3 of the Food and Drugs Act. Presumably, therefore, failure to comply with the standards laid down in these Orders and Regulations cannot be made the subject of a prosecution by a Food and Drugs Authority under Section 3. It is difficult to justify this complexity of procedure. In a recent case, sausages were found to be deficient in meat, the analysis revealing that 36 per cent meat was present instead of the minimum 50 per cent. A striking feature of this case, however, was the long delay before the case reached the Courts. The Chairman of the Bench stated that he felt the Ministry of Food should have brought the case before the Court sooner, since some five months had elapsed since the offence had been discovered. As the Defence pointed out, if the Ministry of Food attached such importance to the case, why was there some five months delay between the results of the tests on the sausages being received and the case being brought into Court. The time limit under the Food and Drugs Act, 1938, does not apply to procedure under these Regulations.—Recently, a Sampling Officer of a Local Authority purchased some sausages and the Analyst's report revealed a considerable difference between the meat content and the standard laid down under the Regulations. The facts were reported to the Ministry in case they wished to take action. Several weeks later, without any notification to the Food and Drugs Authority, an Enforcement Officer of the Ministry of Food, who had not previously been concerned with the case, called at the shop, informing the butcher of the offence and questioning him as to his action and methods. Both Food and Drugs Sampling Officers and members of the trade will appreciate the exasperation that follows such a visit. After approximately nine weeks from the sample being taken, the tradesman in question was still unaware of the action proposed by the Ministry. Such delay, with the power and resources that the Ministry of Food have at their disposal, is most difficult to justify. It creates a great deal of friction between the trade and the Sampling Officer and brings yet another official into the picture, the necessity for whose presence it is very difficult to understand. Apart from the unnecessary overlapping of the samples that may be taken, the visits of two officers possibly to the same premises for the same purpose does entail a wa§{e of manpower and causes much irritation. Is it not time that Food and Drugs Authorities on whom the onus rests for 99 per cent of sampling of food and drugs were permitted by statute to prosecute for contravention of standards laid down under the Defence Regulations?

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 54 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2003

Joel A.C Baum and Theresa K Lant

Organizations create their environments by constructing interpretations and then acting on them as if they were true. This study examines the cognitive spatial boundaries…

Abstract

Organizations create their environments by constructing interpretations and then acting on them as if they were true. This study examines the cognitive spatial boundaries that managers of Manhattan hotels impose on their competitive environment. We derive and estimate a model that specifies how the attributes of managers’ own hotels and potential rival hotels influence their categorization of competing and non-competing hotels. We show that similarity in geographic location, price, and size are central to managers’ beliefs about the identity of their competitors, but that the weights they assign to these dimensions when categorizing competitors diverge from their influence on competitive outcomes, and indicate an overemphasis on geographic proximity. Although such categorization is commonly conceived as a rational process based on the assessment of similarities and differences, we suggest that significant distortions can occur in the categorization process and examine empirically how factors including managers’ attribution errors, cognitive limitations, and (in)experience lead them to make type I and type II competitor categorization errors and to frame competitive environments that are incomplete, erroneous, or even superstitious. Our findings suggest that understanding inter-firm competition may require greater attention being given to the cognitive foundations of competition.

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Geography and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-034-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Charles Keating, Thomas Robinson and Barry Clemson

Explains a process the authors have enacted several times for facilitating organizational self‐reflection, which they call “reflective inquiry”. Shows how the process is…

Abstract

Explains a process the authors have enacted several times for facilitating organizational self‐reflection, which they call “reflective inquiry”. Shows how the process is based on the authors’ current understanding of the concept referred to as organizational learning. Finally, advocates future participatory action research whereby organizational learning theory is tested and modified through the design, enactment and observation of further processes; these processes, in turn, should be designed based on current understandings of organizational learning.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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