Search results

1 – 10 of 14
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1989

Thomas M. Jeannot

Book VI of Aristotle′s Nicomachean Ethics is commented on,aimed at showing its relevance to some themes in contemporary moralphilosophy. It is argued that the classical…

Abstract

Book VI of Aristotle′s Nicomachean Ethics is commented on, aimed at showing its relevance to some themes in contemporary moral philosophy. It is argued that the classical approach to morality (Aristotle) and the Enlightened approach (Kant) need not compose antinomy. Instead, the Aristotelian emphases on the development of virtuous character and the nature of practical wisdom coalesce with the Kantian emphasis on autonomy – what Falk calls “responsible self‐direction” – in the person of the moral leader. In particular, great moralists have recognised that moral wisdom is not mainly a matter of strict obedience to rules. While rules have their place, the subject matter of ethics cannot be determined by a quasi‐mathematical formalism. Over‐emphasis on the formalism of the categorical imperative obscures Kant′s more fundamental emphasis on autonomy. The autonomous person, able to exercise moral leadership, cultivates the Aristotelian virtue of phronēsis.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Thomas M. Jeannot

Reflecting on “The Rehabilitation of Karl Marx” as a theoretical economist 100 years after his death, Robert Paul Wolff, on the way to writing Understanding Marx, noted…

Abstract

Reflecting on “The Rehabilitation of Karl Marx” as a theoretical economist 100 years after his death, Robert Paul Wolff, on the way to writing Understanding Marx, noted that Marx had written, “at a conservative estimate, five thousand pages of theoretical material”. Therefore, in order to understand Marx's theoretical achievement, which Wolff compares with Darwin, Freud and Einstein (p. 714), “The simplest sort of common sense demands that we estimate Marx's place in the intellectual history of our civilization on the basis of this mass of economic theory” (p. 713). In addition to the three volumes of Capital, the three volumes of the Theories of Surplus Value, the Grundrisse, and the Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy, however, “Marx also wrote, as a young man, a handful of exuberant, obscure, derivative, romantic reflections on the human condition…The same sort of common sense dictates that we not construe these youthful speculations as the final utterances of the true Marx” (p. 713). With these assertions, Wolff is reviving an old issue, for the benefit of a “modern mathematical reinterpretation of Marx” (pp. 715–16), that some had thought was laid to rest by the widespread availability of the Grundrisse.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Thomas M. Jeannot

Rethinking Marxism after the Cold War includes the task ofreconstructing its genesis, beginning with the role of left Hegelianismin Marx′s development of historical…

Abstract

Rethinking Marxism after the Cold War includes the task of reconstructing its genesis, beginning with the role of left Hegelianism in Marx′s development of historical materialism. Reviews the debates within the Hegelian school at the time of Marx′s “conversion” to it, in order to situate his dissertation project (1838‐41) on the difference between the Democritean and Epicurean philosophy of nature. A standard view has Marx writing from the perspectives of his mentor, Bruno Bauer, with whom he later broke in “On the Jewish Question” (1843). Argues that this view is incorrect. Instead, Marx constructs an analogy, according to which Democritus is to the Old Hegelians as Epicurus is to the Young Hegelians. The Epicurean “atom” then becomes a cryptogram of Bauerian Selbstbewusstsein. Although Epicurus has his sympathy, Marx is ultimately critical of him. Epicurean freedom is abstract and theoretical, but the liberation Marx aims towards is concrete and effective.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 21 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Thomas M. Jeannot

Discusses family resemblances between the philosophical and socialoutlooks of Karl Marx and John Dewey. Despite fundamental differences(for example Dewey′s meliorism…

Abstract

Discusses family resemblances between the philosophical and social outlooks of Karl Marx and John Dewey. Despite fundamental differences (for example Dewey′s meliorism versus Marx′s commitment to revolutionary struggle), the degree of their philosophical compatibility is considerable. There are, for example, striking parallels between their respective versions of epistemological pragmatism and naturalism. Discusses in detail resemblances between their respective critiques of liberal capitalism.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 21 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Thomas Klikauer

The purpose of this conceptual‐theoretical review article is to examine two claims made by critical management studies (CMS): that CMS is emancipatory and that it has…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual‐theoretical review article is to examine two claims made by critical management studies (CMS): that CMS is emancipatory and that it has critical theory (CT) as its origin and prime theoretical base.

Design/methodology/approach

Two theories are contrasted: CT and CMS. The paper analyses one of CMS' newest key publications: the Oxford Handbook of Critical Management Studies in great detail focusing on epidemiology and philosophy.

Findings

The main finding is that CMS is a critical representation of mainstream MS. CT focuses on emancipation while CMS provides a system‐conforming interpretation of traditional MS that rarely presents alternatives to mainstream MS.

Research limitations/implications

The key implication is that CMS assists mainstream MS as a corrective but, in general, does not enhance emancipation.

Practical implications

The paper assists researchers in the field of management studies (MS) and its “critical” offspring of CMS in understanding the role CMS plays for traditional MS.

Social implications

It makes scholars aware that research conducted from within CMS provides system‐conforming solution to issues such as corporate social responsibility (CSR) and environmental issues. CMS scholarship is not a critical evaluation of, for example, CSR and environmental issues directed towards emancipation from present structures of managerial domination.

Originality/value

The value of the paper is threefold: for the first time, CMS has been measured against its own claims; the article provides clarity on three issues: MS, CMS and CT; and it assists research in the area of CMS and CT because it shows that the former is about improving mainstream MS while the latter is about emancipation.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Stephan Leixnering, Andrea Schikowitz, Gerhard Hammerschmid and Renate E. Meyer

Public sector reforms of recent decades in Europe have promoted managerialism and aimed at introducing private sector thinking and practices. However, with regard to…

Abstract

Public sector reforms of recent decades in Europe have promoted managerialism and aimed at introducing private sector thinking and practices. However, with regard to public sector executives’ self-understanding, managerial role identities have not replaced bureaucratic ones; rather, components from both paradigms were combined. In this chapter, we introduce a bi-dimensional identity approach (attitudes and practices) that allows for different combinations and forms of hybridity. Empirically, we explore the role identities of public sector executives across Europe, building on survey data from over 7,000 top public officials in 19 countries (COCOPS survey). We identify country-level profiles, as well as patterns across countries, and find that administrative traditions can account for these profiles and patterns only to a limited extent. Rather, they have to be complemented by factors such as stability of the institutional environment (indicating lower shares of hybrid combinations) or extent of reform pressures (indicating higher shares of hybrid combinations).

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Gilles Jeannot

This article reviews a set of studies depicting how public officials (agents) in French public utilities have reacted, in practical terms, to customer‐focused reforms.

Abstract

Purpose

This article reviews a set of studies depicting how public officials (agents) in French public utilities have reacted, in practical terms, to customer‐focused reforms.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is based on data drawn from labour studies commissioned by French public utilities to evaluate the effects of reforms. Qualitative research using direct observation or semi‐structured interviews testing the assumption that the real locus of change in behaviour, values and identity stem from changes in work practices not principles.

Findings

There is evidence of a progressive diffusion of new public management values but this varies between different groups and their changes in behaviour are triggered more by the adjustment of workers' practices to new management rules and technical innovations than the imposition of new principles or cultural values. The responses of agents are also often inconsistent. This suggests that the generalised findings of research based on surveys and questionnaires may not capture the reality of change, which is more complex, varied, inconsistent and contingent.

Originality/value

It offers a challenging critique of the use of surveys and top down approaches in the study of the impact of new public management on public officials and suggests a bottom up approach throws more light on how and why changes in behaviour, values and identity occur.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2017

Claudette Lafaye and Laurent Thévenot

There are a number of conflicts today involving groups and individuals as regards nature in its various forms. The aim of this article is to examine how these give rise to…

Abstract

There are a number of conflicts today involving groups and individuals as regards nature in its various forms. The aim of this article is to examine how these give rise to changes in the forms of critique and justification that underpin them. Based on various points of disagreement as to how nature should be developed, three possibilities of change have been put forward for examination according to the importance of the transformations required: (a) integration of the model into existing orders of justification, (b) development of a new order based on the same model, (c) serious adjustment of the underlying common matrix of orders and the basis it offers for appreciating injustice.

Details

Justification, Evaluation and Critique in the Study of Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-379-1

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Barrie O. Pettman and Richard Dobbins

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Abstract

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1947

ALFRED LOEWENBERG

The following list is a first attempt to catalogue and describe systematically the British Museum's extensive holdings of early opera librettos and related plays. The…

Abstract

The following list is a first attempt to catalogue and describe systematically the British Museum's extensive holdings of early opera librettos and related plays. The great importance of these unpretentious booklets as supplementary and, more often than not, even primary sources for the history and bibliography of dramatic music, besides or instead of the scores, was already clearly recognized in the eighteenth century by Dr. Burney and other scholars. But it is only since 1914, the year in which O. G. T. Sonneck's Library of Congress Catalogue of opera librettos printed before 1800 appeared, that their documentary value could to any greater extent be put to general use in international musicological research. A similar bibliography of the British Museum librettos, while naturally duplicating many Washington entries, would produce a great number of additional tides, not a few of them otherwise unrecorded; it would provide the musical scholar with the key to a collection unequalled elsewhere in Europe, which owing to the peculiar nature of the material is not easily accessible by means of the General Catalogue.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

1 – 10 of 14