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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2019

Xun Li, Clyde W. Holsapple and Thomas J. Goldsby

In today’s constantly evolving global business environment, multidivisional firms (MDFs) require an organizational structure for supply chain management (SCM) that…

Abstract

Purpose

In today’s constantly evolving global business environment, multidivisional firms (MDFs) require an organizational structure for supply chain management (SCM) that facilitates the development of supply chain agility. This research aims to investigate what structural elements of an MDF’s SCM team contribute to supply chain agility.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-sample field study was conducted. Four MDFs with top-performing supply chains (Sample 1) were first studied to identify agility-supporting structural elements. Then, quantitative data from 35 MDFs with contrasting levels of supply chain agility (Sample 2) were collected to test the theoretical propositions advanced from Sample 1 findings.

Findings

The results reveal four structural elements that exert a positive impact on an MDF’s supply chain agility: hierarchical position of the divisional top supply chain executive, scope of divisional supply chain operations, hierarchical position of the top supply chain executive at the headquarters and scope of SCM coordination by the headquarters.

Originality/value

First, this study provides a comparatively comprehensive understanding of the SCM organization structure in MDFs. Second, this study is one of the first to provide empirically supported theoretical insights about the linkage between an MDF’s organizational structure for SCM and supply chain agility.

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Theodore Stank, Terry Esper, Thomas J. Goldsby, Walter Zinn and Chad Autry

The digital advances in modern industry are accelerating changes in the broad social, economic, political and business environments within which supply chain management…

Abstract

Purpose

The digital advances in modern industry are accelerating changes in the broad social, economic, political and business environments within which supply chain management (SCM) is practiced. Given this extraordinary contextual upheaval, the conduct of research to identify, define, understand and explain how the digital revolution will impact key SCM concepts is imperative. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a theoretically grounded Digitally Dominant Paradigm (DDP) framework that demonstrates how digital concepts and insights can be infused into existing elements of best-practice SCM, in order to help guide future research.

Design/methodology/approach

Middle-range theorizing is proposed as a means to explore the ways in which researchers can explain supply chain phenomena (i.e. build theory) in the age of digitalization.

Findings

An example of how a DDP framework can be applied to a well-entrenched logistics/supply chain concept is provided, and the authors conclude by identifying exemplary research propositions for future exploration.

Originality/value

The broad goal of the paper is to spark forward-looking supply chain scholarship based upon development of a DDP of SCM.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 49 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

David Gligor, Javad Feizabadi, Ivan Russo, Michael J. Maloni and Thomas J. Goldsby

Scholars have recently begun to empirically evaluate the triple-A supply chain, which emphasizes concurrent capabilities in agility, adaptability and alignment across the…

Abstract

Purpose

Scholars have recently begun to empirically evaluate the triple-A supply chain, which emphasizes concurrent capabilities in agility, adaptability and alignment across the supply chain to develop sustainable competitive advantage. Complexity theory suggests however that other combinations of triple-A capabilities may be equally effective, especially given a firm's strategic orientation relative to its market and its supply chain. Our research objective was to examine what combinations of these capabilities lead to the same outcome (i.e. high firm performance).

Design/methodology/approach

We collected 182 survey responses from a global sample of supply chain managers. Qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) was employed to assess effective recipes of agility, adaptability, alignment, supply chain orientation, and market orientation.

Findings

Our results revealed four distinct “recipes” (i.e. combinations of agility, adaptability, alignment, supply chain orientation and market orientation) that lead to high levels of firm performance.

Originality/value

Our results indicate that firms currently do not necessarily have to concomitantly develop capabilities across all triple-A components. Considering the costs associated with developing each of these capabilities, the findings allow us to derive several theoretical and managerial insights.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Theodore P. Stank and Thomas J. Goldsby

There has been little conceptual work that comprehensively examines the changing role of the corporate transportation function in the modern business environment…

Abstract

There has been little conceptual work that comprehensively examines the changing role of the corporate transportation function in the modern business environment. Successful managers today require a broad view of transportation management’s role and responsibilities in an integrated supply chain. This paper clarifies the major transportation decision areas and introduces a framework that positions corporate transportation management within the overall integrated supply chain environment. The framework portrays initial transportation decisions as strategic, long‐term decisions that focus on the overall supply chain transportation system. Once decisions are understood at this level, the decision‐making scope becomes increasingly tactical in nature, focusing on operations that implement the overall system decisions.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Brian S. Fugate, Beth Davis‐Sramek and Thomas J. Goldsby

The purpose of this paper is to develop a better understanding of how strategic relationships between firms and environmental context affect operational decisions and how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a better understanding of how strategic relationships between firms and environmental context affect operational decisions and how each firm allocates resources to improve overall firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research is integrated with previous research. Data for the qualitative research are collected through focus groups and semi‐structured interviews that employ grand tour questioning, facility tours using key informants, and use of selective artifacts.

Findings

The paper develops a model that examines how environmental factors, specifically the context of the capacity constraints in the transportation industry, can influence shippers to form long‐term and mutually beneficial relationships with their carriers and how these relationships can lead to improved performance at the operational level.

Research limitations/implications

The paper incorporates five foundational theories into one integrated model in the context of business‐to‐business transportation collaboration. The specific contributions from this model most likely cannot have been derived by adopting only one or two of these theories, and this paper provides only one context within which these theories can be integrated. Future research should focus on areas of incompatibility and compatibility among these foundational theories. With this understanding, theory integration should spur future research by attempting to evaluate the nature of business systemically and holistically.

Practical implications

Though collaboration and relationship management has received much attention, realizing improvements in firm performance has proven difficult. Once collaborative behaviors between shippers and carriers are established at a strategic level, managers must carefully assess how to drive those collaborative behaviors to the operational levels of each firm.

Originality/value

This paper extends previous supply chain relationship research, which primarily focuses on strategic interactions between firms, by focusing on the context in which they are carried out. It integrates managerial insights with foundational theories from marketing, logistics, and operations to create theory of how supply chain relationships facilitate firm decisions regarding allocation, sharing, and management of resources on an operational level.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2009

Shashank Rao and Thomas J. Goldsby

The purpose of this paper is to review the growing literature examining supply chain risk management (SCRM) and to develop a typology of risks in the supply chain.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the growing literature examining supply chain risk management (SCRM) and to develop a typology of risks in the supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws its insights and conclusions from a review of the literature on supply chain risk, and a synthesis of the broader domain of risk management.

Findings

While the literature on SCRM is growing, the literature lacks an organized structure for the sources of supply chain risk. The current paper bridges this gap by synthesizing the diverse literature into a typology of risk sources, consisting of environmental factors, industry factors, organizational factors, problem‐specific factors, and decision‐maker related factors.

Practical implications

The paper devises a typology that can be used by managers to measure and assess the vulnerabilities of their company and supply chain. The typology also provides avenues for future research that further guides practitioners in the management of their supply chain risk portfolio.

Originality/value

SCRM is rapidly developing into a favored research area for academicians as well as practitioners, especially after the attacks of September 11 and the recent array of natural disasters. This paper develops a methodology for structuring academic inquiry in this important research area.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

Shashank Rao, Thomas J. Goldsby and Deepak Iyengar

The purpose of this study is to investigate key differences between web‐only and multi‐channel retailers in terms of five different measures of web activity and three…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate key differences between web‐only and multi‐channel retailers in terms of five different measures of web activity and three different forms of outsourcing behavior. Specifically, the research examines the marketing and logistics efficacy between business‐to‐consumer (B2C) retailers who sell exclusively via the web and retailers for whom the web offers one additional channel for sales. Finally, it is suggested that how this study may give rise to future research in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

This empirical study using the lens of transaction cost economics (TCE) to examine hypotheses regarding customer buying behavior and the retailers' proclivity to outsource is conducted. Secondary data sources provide key metrics for the more than 250 companies found in the sample.

Findings

Several key differences exist between the efficacy of web‐only and multi‐channel retailers, which can be explained with the TCE framework. Both web‐only and multi‐channel retailers are found to exhibit respective advantages. Multi‐channel retailers enjoy more web traffic and offer more items for the consumer, yet are disadvantaged in terms of ease of search and conversion rate (percentage of shoppers who actually buy). In addition, web‐only retailers are more likely to outsource the functions of logistics, marketing, and customer support.

Practical implications

This study has value to researchers and practitioners in that it illustrates how two of the most common types of retailing alternatives differ from each other. Multi‐channel retailers are challenged with the broad scope and immense collection of goods they offer and, therefore, struggle to convert shoppers into buyers. Web‐only retailers, on the other hand, enjoy less web traffic, but prove more effective in conversion rates, perhaps related to their more extensive use of outsourced expertise in logistics, marketing, and customer support services.

Originality/value

In the decade since internet retailing (e‐tailing) began to be accepted as a new sales channel, e‐tailing has grown to a market size of over $160 billion within the USA alone. However, empirical examination of the functioning and performance of this sales channel is only now commencing.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Thomas J. Goldsby and David J. Closs

Activity‐based costing (ABC) is a tool used by managers to more closely approximate the “true costs” of operations. The application of ABC in logistics is more…

Abstract

Activity‐based costing (ABC) is a tool used by managers to more closely approximate the “true costs” of operations. The application of ABC in logistics is more commonplace today than just a few years ago, though still far short of universal. Sound tracking of operational costs is critical when pursuing the logistics objective of providing desired customer service at the lowest total cost. This research illustrates an actual application of ABC to reverse logistics activities performed across supply chain organizations. More specifically, a case study of a Michigan beverage distributor and retailer that collect empty beverage containers for recycling purposes is presented. The case study demonstrates the ABC application in detail and discusses the re‐engineering of supply chain‐wide processes resulting from the analysis.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Thomas J. Goldsby and Sebastián J. García‐Dastugue

Manufacturing flow management is the supply chain management process that includes all activities necessary to move products through the plants and to obtain, implement…

Abstract

Manufacturing flow management is the supply chain management process that includes all activities necessary to move products through the plants and to obtain, implement, and manage manufacturing flexibility in the supply chain. Manufacturing flexibility reflects the ability to make a variety of products in a timely manner at the lowest possible cost. To achieve the desired level of manufacturing flexibility, planning and execution must extend beyond the four walls of the manufacturer. In this paper, we describe the manufacturing flow management process in detail to show how it can be implemented within a company and managed across firms in the supply chain. We examine the activities of each sub‐process; evaluate the interfaces with corporate functions, processes, and firms; and provide examples of successful implementation.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1998

David J. Closs, Anthony S. Roath, Thomas J. Goldsby, James A. Eckert and Stephen M. Swartz

This paper reports simulation research that empirically investigates and compares supply chain performance under varying conditions of information exchange and demand…

Abstract

This paper reports simulation research that empirically investigates and compares supply chain performance under varying conditions of information exchange and demand uncertainty. Specifically, the research objective is to quantitatively document the characteristics and performance impact of information exchange among supply chain entities. The findings suggest that the response‐based supply chain model consistently outperforms the anticipatory model in terms of customer service delivered under conditions of both low and high demand variation. Comparisons of inventory holdings across supply chain models demonstrate that the retailers' inventory burden is significantly lower in the response‐based scenario. The inventory savings enjoyed by retailers in the response‐based model are substantial enough to lower system‐wide inventories. In sum, the study supports the feasibility of achieving both improved service and lower inventories as a result of information sharing.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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