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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Gavin Baxter, Thomas Hainey and Gary McKenna

Abstract

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2019

Gavin Baxter and Thomas Hainey

This paper provides an analysis and insight into undergraduate student views concerning the use of virtual reality technology towards whether it has the potential to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides an analysis and insight into undergraduate student views concerning the use of virtual reality technology towards whether it has the potential to support and provide novel pedagogical avenues towards teaching and learning in higher education. The purpose of this paper is to ascertain student views about the application of VR technology within their degree programmes from a pedagogical perspective in addition to identifying potential challenges to VR adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design adopted a mixed methods approach through the use of a questionnaire that was disseminated to undergraduate students studying in the discipline area of the creative industries. Through a series of open and closed questions, student views on VR adoption in higher education were analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The results were analysed statistically through a series of Mann–Whitney and Kruskal–Wallis tests. The qualitative statements were contextualised in the overall perspective of the research with the more relevant viewpoints identified to coincide with aspects of VR discovered in the literature.

Findings

The predominant findings of the research indicated that the majority of the students considered the use of VR to have useful pedagogical implications though not all findings were positive. The findings provided a sound overview of the benefits and potential drawbacks of VR use in general with a more specific focus in an educational context.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the research include the lack of overall generalisations that can be formed from the study due to the sample size and the fact that the results were based from one specific academic institution.

Practical implications

The findings of the research will provide educators with an insight into various perceptions of VR adoption within higher education. This will aid towards allowing them to reflect on whether VR is an appropriate tool to integrate within their curriculum and pedagogical approaches towards course delivery.

Originality/value

Though several studies have explored the use of VR in multiple contexts and subject areas, there still needs to be more research towards its potential drawbacks in a teaching and learning scenario and how to resolve these issues.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Gary McKenna, Gavin Baxter and Thomas Hainey

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a semi-experimental study conducted over a period of two years of five degree programmes using a web-based personal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a semi-experimental study conducted over a period of two years of five degree programmes using a web-based personal tutoring system to enhance learner engagement and students’ self-efficacy, towards using personal development planning (PDP) e-portfolios.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a semi-experimental approach using quantitative methods utilising a pre- and post-test design in the form of a general self-efficacy questionnaire inventory.

Findings

The study investigated the extent to which using a virtual learning environment web-based personal tutoring system (VLE WBPTS) can impact positively on the learners’ self-efficacy of the students’ undertaking a degree programme which promotes engagement with PDP e-portfolios.

Research limitations/implications

More empirical research is required to establish whether PDP and e-portfolios have a positive effect on students’ perceived self-efficacy. Further testing is required to establish whether the VLE WBPTS can have a positive effect on other beneficial elements associated with PDP and e-portfolio usage such as students: learning styles, learner conscientiousness, reflective thinking and effective learner skills.

Practical implications

The introduction of interventions that involve the utilisation of a VLE WBPTS may have a more significant impact and yield positive results when the period of usage is extended beyond the initial period of six weeks to a minimum period of 12 weeks.

Originality/value

This study was one of few studies to use a pre/post-test design to collect and analyse empirical data about whether a VLE WBPTS can have a positive effect on students’ self-efficacy towards using PDP e-portfolios.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Gary McKenna, Gavin Baxter and Thomas Hainey

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the attitudes of staff and students towards adopting the use of e-portfolios for the purposes of supporting the concept of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the attitudes of staff and students towards adopting the use of e-portfolios for the purposes of supporting the concept of personal development planning (PDP). The study compares and contrasts the views and opinions of staff and students at one UK Higher Education Institution (HEI) about whether e-portfolios can support PDP.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a case study approach, this study presents empirical data gathered from two surveys involving 460 students and 182 lecturers from one UK HEI, collected from four different campuses across the West of Scotland.

Findings

The results of the surveys showed that the framework the authors used in the research to collect information about students and staffs attitudes was effective and that further research is merited for a more extensive investigation into PDP e-portfolio usage within HEI.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted at only one UK HEI so at this stage of the research, it is difficult to assess how generalisable the findings are.

Practical implications

This study provides useful empirical evidence to educators who may be considering employing e-portfolios within an educational context. For example, the views of students and staff identified in this paper can aid towards informing educators about some of the issues that might impact on using e-portfolios for supporting PDP in higher education.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first work that presents survey data on both students’ and lecturers’ attitudes towards e-portfolio use to support and facilitate PDP.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Thomas Hainey, Gavin Baxter and Amanda Ford

Rudimentary programming is an essential, transferrable, problem solving skill in many higher education (HE) programmes in academic institutions including Software…

Abstract

Purpose

Rudimentary programming is an essential, transferrable, problem solving skill in many higher education (HE) programmes in academic institutions including Software Engineering, Business Information Technology, Computer Games Development, Design and Technology. The purpose of this paper is to address some of the problematic issues associated with teaching programming by the utilisation of a new novel teaching approach called games-based construction learning (GBCL) to attempt to increase motivation, engagement and learning effectiveness. An international and national trend is to introduce coding at earlier education levels resulting in upper primary education (PE) being the focus of this paper to ascertain if GBCL using Scratch to teach programming concepts is more effective at different levels of upper PE.

Design/methodology/approach

A large-scale empirical study introducing GBCL to teach programming concepts into 16 classes between levels 4 and 7 in PE utilising 384 children. A detailed implementation framework for GBCL using Scratch in PE was utilised to address all incorporation issues and the games constructed by the children scored utilising a game codification scheme specifically designed to address programming and design as a quantification rubric. The experiment utilised eight 1- h lessons on GBCL using Scratch.

Findings

The resulted in 178 games of varying levels of complexity developed. The results indicated that GBCL was an effective mechanism to teach programming concepts using Scratch at all levels of upper PE. Primary seven students scored higher in relation to the design metric of the quantification codification rubric.

Research limitations/implications

Under the Curriculum for Excellence (CfE) in Scotland non-traditional teaching approaches are encouraged and development of digital literacy skill is highly advocated. This has resulted in a new approach, novel approach called GBCL where children create their own games utilising an engine such as Scratch is gaining significant attention in terms of being a novel approach. Despite a plethora of similar studies associated with GBCL, it is still not as developed as games-based learning and requires further empirical studies to support the validity of the approach and resolve identified issues.

Practical implications

Computer programming itself can lead to a highly rewarding career in a number of sectors from games development to banking, such as cybersecurity and systems development. In the last decade, in particular due to the ubiquitous nature of technology there is an increasing international and national trend associated with teaching rudimentary programming concepts at a far younger age including secondary education and the upper PE level. Introducing programming at an earlier level is now being considered essential as the path to transfer from novice to expert programmer level in time is considered nearly a decade approximately. The introduction of GBCL interventions may yield positive results in a supplementary learning capacity in accordance with the CfE and increase the educational effectiveness of programming education in later levels of education.

Originality/value

This study presents a large-scale empirical evaluation of GBCL in upper PE utilising a compiled implementation framework for incorporation and a detailed game codification scheme to quantify the games produced highlighting coding constructs and design.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Thomas Hainey

The purpose of this study is to look at existing literature and empirical evidence to compile a number of viable research directions to move the study of digital games for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to look at existing literature and empirical evidence to compile a number of viable research directions to move the study of digital games for learning forward.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a combination of the archival research methodology to present secondary empirical evidence and a large-scale survey methodology to present primary empirical evidence. The archival methodology reviewed a number of extensive systematic literature reviews, and the survey methodology specifically looked at single and multiplayer motivations for playing games in education. A synthesis of the secondary and primary research findings was produced.

Findings

The findings produced the following five viable research directions: more Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs), more longitudinal studies, more studies investigating the pedagogical benefits of collaborative play, more studies investigating the pedagogical benefits of 2D and 3D games and more detailed evaluation frameworks.

Originality/value

This paper presents a synthesis of previous research and empirical evidence to produce a number of potential research directions to drive the study of digital games for learning in Higher Education (HE) forward.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2019

Aishah Abdul Razak, Mohamad Izani Zainal Abidin and Thomas M. Connolly

Studies have shown various benefits of using technology especially digital games in making classroom learning more engaging and motivating. In Scotland, a new approach to…

Abstract

Studies have shown various benefits of using technology especially digital games in making classroom learning more engaging and motivating. In Scotland, a new approach to education called the Curriculum for Excellence (CfE) was implemented in 2010. This approach moves away from traditional ways of teaching to more active learning. One of the popular approaches among teachers is the use of digital games-based learning (DGBL). This chapter presents the findings from some interviews with lecturers of education, in charge of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) courses at Scottish Universities on how pre-service teachers are being prepared to embrace CfE in general and DGBL in particular, and also what are their views on DGBL and its role within the CfE. Although it was found that the characteristics of CfE, such as being less prescriptive, based on teacher's interpretation and context-based, allowed DGBL to fit well into the new curriculum, the lecturers in general do not see the need for emphasis on DGBL at university level. There is a lack of courses on DGBL and the pre-service teachers who are keen to take forward this approach are expected to do so in their own time. Based on the findings from the interviews, some recommendations are made for the role of Higher Education Institutions (HEI) in promoting DGBL among the pre-service teachers.

Details

Management and Administration of Higher Education Institutions at Times of Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-628-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Through a survey of 200 employees working in five of the thirty establishments analysed in previous research about the microeconomic effects of reducing the working time…

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Abstract

Through a survey of 200 employees working in five of the thirty establishments analysed in previous research about the microeconomic effects of reducing the working time (Cahier 25), the consequences on employees of such a reduction can be assessed; and relevant attitudes and aspirations better known.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 December 2020

Andreas Alexiou, Michaéla C. Schippers, Ilan Oshri and Spyros Angelopoulos

This study uses a critically acclaimed digital game as an instructional tool to explore the role of emotional design elements on psychological flow and perceived learning.

Abstract

Purpose

This study uses a critically acclaimed digital game as an instructional tool to explore the role of emotional design elements on psychological flow and perceived learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ transportation theory to generate a set of antecedents of psychological flow and the theory of flow to connect the gaming experience to positive learning outcomes. The authors investigate the subjective learning experience of players with the use of a psychometric survey, and the authors employ structural equation modelling (SEM) to unearth the direct as well as the indirect effects amongst narrative, aesthetics, flow and learning outcomes.

Findings

The findings of this study demonstrate that narrative and aesthetics in serious games positively influence the perceived learning by facilitating a state of psychological flow.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to better understanding and theorizing the role of narrative and aesthetics on learning outcomes in the context of serious games.

Practical implications

The findings of this study bear valuable implications for the design of serious games as they highlight the importance of elements often disregarded as not directly related to the learning process and are typically absent from the design of serious games.

Originality/value

Prior studies have identified aesthetics and narratives as design elements that contribute to the perceived enjoyment of a game; this study empirically investigates the role of narratives and aesthetics in enhancing perceived learning through psychological flow.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Thomas Chesney, Swee-Hoon Chuah, Robert Hoffmann, Wendy Hui and Jeremy Larner

The purpose of this paper is to study the influence of user personality and vlaues on the number of connections users make, the number of requests for connections that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the influence of user personality and vlaues on the number of connections users make, the number of requests for connections that users give out, and the number of connections invitations users receive.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a field study of 179 participants interacting in a novel virtual world. The world’s server logs are used to capture sociometrics about the users and their interaction.

Findings

Findings suggest that personality and values influence the number of friends users make and the number of friendship requests users give out, but not the number of friendship invitations users receive. Only one personality trait – conscientiousness – exhibits homophily.

Originality/value

Perosnality and social value orientation have rarely been studied together in information systems (IS) research, despite research showing the two have an impact on IS relevant constructs. The use of server logs for data capture is novel. Avatar friendship is an under-researched concept in IS.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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