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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1943

William Schroeder and Thomas H. Hazlett

THE modern aeroplane is constructed largely from sheet metal. As such, the most important production problems are those of sheet metal forming, and assembling. Production…

Abstract

THE modern aeroplane is constructed largely from sheet metal. As such, the most important production problems are those of sheet metal forming, and assembling. Production is here considered as not only the act of forming and assembling the required number of parts, but also the making of forming tools, and all processing of parts such as heat‐treating. Only that phase of the above concept of production which deals with the tooling for production and the forming and heat‐treating will be considered here. The design of the aircraft parts will also be discussed somewhat, for it is obvious that the design of the part (designed shape and materials used) frequently determines whether the part can or cannot be readily made.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 15 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 19 November 2007

James W. Gabberty and Jennifer D.E. Thomas

This paper examines the depth, erudition, and rigor of contemporary research on knowledge management as a causal factor that influences the ultimate outcome of…

Abstract

This paper examines the depth, erudition, and rigor of contemporary research on knowledge management as a causal factor that influences the ultimate outcome of multinational corporation (MNC) expansion, bounded by the confines of information and communication technology (ICT) competences identified as behavioral, business, and technological. Through discussion highlighting the dominant knowledge management (KM) research themes within the milieu of the global firm, readers will gain definitive and practical insight into relevant topics that may be used to stimulate development of growth strategies for the firm.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2017

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Thomas W. Hazlett, Jürgen Müller and Roberto Muñoz

This paper aims to estimate the social gains from an analog TV switch‐off in 13 EU countries, focusing on the value of TV band spectrum in alternative uses.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to estimate the social gains from an analog TV switch‐off in 13 EU countries, focusing on the value of TV band spectrum in alternative uses.

Design/methodology/approach

By using data from existing mobile phone markets, changes are projected in retail prices for wireless voice services, assuming a reallocation (to mobile telephony) of about 42 percent of TV band spectrum.

Findings

It is forecast that retail mobile phone tariffs would substantially decline if a transition to digital television led to enhanced availability of VHF/UHF spectrum for wireless telecommunications. Consumer surplus gains offset transition costs by at least 2‐to‐1, and as much as 45‐to‐1. These net benefits are conservatively estimated in that other services (apart from mobile telephony) could prove more socially valuable, and because we ignore the considerable increase in video choices the transition could provide. It is also found, however, that wireless operators' profits sharply decline with additional spectrum, due to more intense competition. This suggests a public choice dynamic, often overlooked, that potentially helps to explain the slow pace of the digital TV transition.

Practical implications

Regulations blocking TV band spectrum from reallocation to non‐TV applications ought to be re‐examined in light of the associated costs and benefits.

Originality/value

This paper quantifies, using conservative methods, the cost of current spectrum policies.

Details

info, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2015

Michael Preece

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge…

Abstract

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge management in the service industry is sparse. This research seeks to examine absorptive capacity and its four capabilities of acquisition, assimilation, transformation and exploitation and their impact on effective knowledge management. All of these capabilities are strategies that enable external knowledge to be recognized, imported and integrated into, and further developed within the organization effectively. The research tests the relationships between absorptive capacity and effective knowledge management through analysis of quantitative data (n = 549) drawn from managers and employees in 35 residential aged care organizations in Western Australia. Responses were analysed using Partial Least Square-based Structural Equation Modelling. Additional analysis was conducted to assess if the job role (of manager or employee) and three industry context variables of profit motive, size of business and length of time the organization has been in business, impacted on the hypothesized relationships.

Structural model analysis examines the relationships between variables as hypothesized in the research framework. Analysis found that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities correlated significantly with effective knowledge management, with absorptive capacity explaining 56% of the total variability for effective knowledge management. Findings from this research also show that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities provide a useful framework for examining knowledge management in the service industry. Additionally, there were no significant differences in the perceptions held between managers and employees, nor between respondents in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Furthermore, the size of the organization and length of time the organization has been in business did not impact on absorptive capacity, the four capabilities and effective knowledge management.

The research considers implications for business in light of these findings. The role of managers in providing leadership across the knowledge management process was confirmed, as well as the importance of guiding routines and knowledge sharing throughout the organization. Further, the results indicate that within the participating organizations there are discernible differences in the way that some organizations manage their knowledge, compared to others. To achieve effective knowledge management, managers need to provide a supportive workplace culture, facilitate strong employee relationships, encourage employees to seek out new knowledge, continually engage in two-way communication with employees and provide up-to-date policies and procedures that guide employees in doing their work. The implementation of knowledge management strategies has also been shown in this research to enhance the delivery and quality of residential aged care.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-707-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2007

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045029-2

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 29 May 2018

Eneli Kindsiko

Abstract

Details

Organisational Control in University Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-674-3

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2018

Abstract

Details

Including a Symposium on Mary Morgan: Curiosity, Imagination, and Surprise
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-423-7

Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2007

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045029-2

Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2007

Kimberly A. McDuffie, Thomas E. Scruggs and Margo A. Mastropieri

Thirty-two qualitative research reports on co-teaching in inclusive classrooms, identified through a comprehensive literature search, are reviewed. Studies have included…

Abstract

Thirty-two qualitative research reports on co-teaching in inclusive classrooms, identified through a comprehensive literature search, are reviewed. Studies have included significant diversity in grade level, geographical location, setting, and took place in three different countries. Overall, teachers and administrators reported a high degree of satisfaction with co-teaching. However, a number of needs were also addressed, including administrative support, appropriate caseloads, planning time, student skill level, and co-teacher compatibility. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

Details

International Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-503-1

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