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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Thomas F. Hawk and Paul Lyons

The purpose of this paper is to illuminate the content and magnitude of care and respect issues in instructional settings, and offer some recommendations on how trainers

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illuminate the content and magnitude of care and respect issues in instructional settings, and offer some recommendations on how trainers and instructors may behave in ways to reveal to learners that caring attitudes and behavior are present in the learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken in this work is to provide an overview of issues and concerns regarding pedagogical care and respect; present the results of some recent research; and to offer some approaches, tools, and concepts for practitioners to consider using in their training situations.

Findings

There are many different types of instructor behavior, or lack of behavior, that learners attribute to an uncaring attitude on the part of the instructor. Learner responses to the perceived lack of care are varied and usually negative. The perceptions influence performance of learners in ways that many instructors are likely not aware. Analysis of the available research provides suggestions for instructors.

Research limitations/implications

There was not much background literature or research to draw on. In future research, it would be desirable to actually correlate learner perceptions of caring‐respect from instructors with learner performance.

Practical implications

This paper represents a “wake‐up call” of sorts for instructors, trainers, and faculty. There are things we do or fail to do that may be perceived negatively by learners and the perceptions could influence their willingness to be engaged in instruction, their motivational level, their desire to fully participate, and the like.

Originality/value

The paper adds some new information to the existing literature about instructor attitudes and behavior towards learners. It offers several methods and tools for instructors to use to help establish a respectful and caring learning environment.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Dale E. Zand and Thomas F. Hawk

Division managers in multi‐division, production organizations often focus primarily on their division's interests and goals and as a result may not be well motivated or

Abstract

Purpose

Division managers in multi‐division, production organizations often focus primarily on their division's interests and goals and as a result may not be well motivated or equipped to formulate optimal, company‐wide policies. In this case study, a new CEO decided to deal with ambiguous, company‐wide policy issues such as pricing, product portfolios, market position, and communication across independent divisions, by installing a parallel organization composed entirely of line managers from different divisions and functions. This paper aims to examine the parallel organization concept and how it was applied, installed and operated to greatly benefit the firm.

Design/methodology/approach

The case describes the operation and outputs of the parallel organization based on data gathered from interviews of managers and detailed analysis of proposed issues and policies formulated over a five‐year period.

Findings

The firm's performance improved significantly as the parallel organization generated policies for costing and pricing products, removing products from the product line, positioning in global markets, and enhancing strategic planning. In addition, the parallel organization sharpened management's analytic and decision skills.

Research limitations/implications

The accuracy of the data and its interpretation and analysis was reviewed and confirmed by management.

Practical implications

This case shows how using a parallel organization, in place of the common practice of staff analysis or consultant investigation, can improve a firm's critical policies, profitability, and orientation to its future environment while better integrating independent divisions.

Originality/value

This is a unique, in‐depth examination of the design and operation of a parallel organization to achieve strategic policy changes and improved communication in a multi‐division firm.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Catherine Gorrell

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Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1900

In 1899 the medical practitioners of Dublin were confronted with an outbreak of a peculiar and obscure illness, characterised by symptoms which were very unusual. For want…

Abstract

In 1899 the medical practitioners of Dublin were confronted with an outbreak of a peculiar and obscure illness, characterised by symptoms which were very unusual. For want of a better explanation, the disorder, which seemed to be epidemic, was explained by the simple expedient of finding a name for it. It was labelled as “beri‐beri,” a tropical disease with very much the same clinical and pathological features as those observed at Dublin. Papers were read before certain societies, and then as the cases gradually diminished in number, the subject lost interest and was dropped.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 2 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and…

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Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1908

A report on this subject has recently been issued by the Local Government Board. It owes its origin to the interest—unfortunately brief—that was aroused some two years…

Abstract

A report on this subject has recently been issued by the Local Government Board. It owes its origin to the interest—unfortunately brief—that was aroused some two years ago, when certain allegations were made concerning the methods in vogue on the other side of the Atlantic for, the preparation of meat products intended to be placed on the English market, and has been drawn up by Dr. A. W. J. MACFADDEN. The report is based on the results obtained by Public Analysts throughout the country, who, in the performance of their official duties, were called upon to examine various samples of canned meat sent out by the United States packing houses; on certain statements made by trade representatives to Dr. MACFADDEN; and, finally, on the results of some analyses of canned meats made by Mr. ELLIS RICHARDS, F.I.C., at the request of the Board. The figures must be regarded as representative of the state of affairs then and now. By far the greater quantity of canned meat that reaches this country and is consumed therein is imported from the United States, and hence, almost of necessity, any criticisms that are made regarding this part of our food supply resolve themselves into criticisms of the Federal Meat Inspection law of the United States and the way in which it is applied by the officials there. The conclusion that Dr. MACFADDEN draws as to the efficacy of this law so far as it regards ourselves is one that was expressed in this journal in May last. He observes that “our position, so far as safeguards provided by American law are concerned, is apparently much as it was before the enactments came into force,” that “so far as the use of preservatives is concerned, the new law has not affected the conditions under which the canned meat trade has been conducted with this country in past years,” and that “the onus of protecting their inhabitants in this respect continues to rest, in the first place, with the Governments of the foreign countries themselves.” The first two statements are sufficiently damning, and the corollary is, of course, obvious. The difficulties must be tackled from this side, but the entire absence, up to the present, of all official standards renders the task of the Public Analyst and the other municipal officials who are jointly concerned with him as regards the health of the districts with which they are connected, a most difficult one, and the business of the unscrupulous “poisoner for dividends,” to use an American phrase, correspondingly easy. We go a little farther than Dr. MACFADDEN, and say that the new law does not protect us even with regard to the general wholesomeness of these products. As late as January last the Inspecting Officer of the Manchester Port Sanitary Authority had occasion to draw attention to the unsatisfactory nature of certain canned goods that were imported direct from America. The examination of a consignment of 1,200 six‐pound tins of canned meat showed that 157 tins were blown, and that 156 tins were of doubtful quality. It follows that in this single instance 1,800 pounds of garbage were exported to this country from the United States, the new law notwithstanding.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 10 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Abstract

Details

Understanding Industry 4.0: AI, the Internet of Things, and the Future of Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-312-9

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1905

Since the publication of the report of the Lancet Commission on Brandy and the prosecutions that followed, much attention has been given to the subject, and although no…

Abstract

Since the publication of the report of the Lancet Commission on Brandy and the prosecutions that followed, much attention has been given to the subject, and although no great additions to our knowledge of the composition of this spirit have recently been made, practical use is now being made of information which has been at our disposal for five years or more, which has already had far‐reaching effects upon the trade.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1901

At a recent inquest upon the body of a woman who was alleged to have died as the result of taking certain drugs for an improper purpose, one of the witnesses described…

Abstract

At a recent inquest upon the body of a woman who was alleged to have died as the result of taking certain drugs for an improper purpose, one of the witnesses described himself as “an analyst and manufacturing chemist,” but when asked by the coroner what qualifications he had, he replied : “I have no qualifications whatever. What I know I learned from my father, who was a well‐known ‘F.C.S.’” Comment on the “F.C.S.” is needless.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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